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In The News: The Goddard School of Akron Presents Fourth Annual Art Auction

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: 
Karis Guran
Director Of Operations
The Goddard School
3306653035
DAkronOH2@goddardschools.com

The Goddard School of Akron Presents Fourth Annual Art Auction

Akron, OH (Grassroots Newswire) March 27, 2013 — The Goddard School located in Akron Ohio is sponsoring it’s fourth annual silent auction of original artwork by the students during the week of April 8 – 12, 2013. This event has blossomed into a magic event for all! Proceeds will be donated to The Akron Children’s Hospital NICU “Walk For Babies” event held on September 22, 2013 at The Akron Zoo.

All art for the auction is created by the students – ages 6 weeks to 6 years – of the school.
 
Every March, the children learn about artists, as well as the media, techniques and materials used to create. Each classroom creates a whole group projects as well as small group collaborations. Materials being used this year include canvas, acrylic, watercolor and oil paints, tissue paper, as well as a variety of mosiacs. Some classrooms have created their own interpretations of noted masterpiecesl; others have created their own work.
 
The Goddard School of Akron will have the exhibit open to parents and visitors Monday – Friday, April 8 – 12, 2013 from 9am-5pm. We invite parents and visitors to bid on the artwork of their selection throughout the week. Previously, the proceeds collected from the sales of the artwork has been matched by the franchisees Karen & Marty Marinos and Frank & Rosemarie Monago. Last year, the Akron and Jackson Twp. Goddard School’s raised nearly $7,000 for the NICU!
 
The Goddard School of Akron is located at 105 Springside Dr. Akron OH 44333. Phone (330) 665-3035 or email DAkronOH2@goddardschools.com to speak to Karis Guran or Lisa Sondej for additional information. 

The Goddard School®: Celebrating 25 Years of Learning through Play.

Learning for fun. Learning for life. The Goddard School uses the most current, academically endorsed methods to ensure that children from six weeks to six years old have fun while learning the skills they need for long-term success in school and in life. Talented teachers collaborate with parents to nurture children into respectful, confident and joyful learners. The Goddard School’s AdvancED and Middle States-accredited F.L.EX. Learning Program reaches more than 45,000 students in nearly 400 Goddard Schools in 35 states. The Goddard School’s comprehensive play-based curriculum, developed with early childhood education experts, provides the best childhood preparation for social and academic success. To learn more about The Goddard School, please visit www.goddardschool.com.

In The News: The Goddard School located in Akron is having an Open House Carnival!Local preschool offers event for community

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Liz Richardson or Karis Guran

The Goddard School® located in Akron, Ohio

105 Springside Dr. Akron, OH 44333

330-665-3035

akrongoddardschool@gmail.com

The Goddard School located in Akron is having an Open House Carnival!
Local preschool offers event for community

Akron, Ohio (Grassroots Newswire) Saturday, July 17, 2012 — The Goddard School®, the premier preschool for children from six weeks to 6 years, located at 105 Springside Dr.  is hosting Carnival Open House on Saturday, July 28th from 10:00 am to Noon.

Children of all ages will enjoy refreshments and fun activities at this special event.   Families will also receive free registration  when they enroll by August 31, 2012.

On-site owner, Frank Monago, along with his Education Director, Liz Richardson and Karis Guran, and faculty which includes teachers trained and experienced in early childhood development, are eager to welcome children into this nurturing environment where the curriculum encourages learning through play. The program offers parents the convenience of extended hours from 7am – 6pm, the flexibility of either half-or full-day schedules and Quality Assurance standards that are monitored corporately.

Parents are encouraged to drop in for a tour or call Liz or Karis directly to arrange a personal appointment at 330-665-3035.

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com
Recently named #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States, by Entrepreneur magazine, for the eleventh consecutive year (January 2012) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales), by Franchise Times, for the fifth consecutive year (October 2011); Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) is expanding The Goddard School® network throughout the United States. Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI currently licenses 380+ franchised schools with more than 45,000 students in 35 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier educational childcare provider in the United States.

In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – July 2012

July 2012  

Parenting with Pruett: Hobbies and Pastimes, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Share your interests with your child. It’s important for parents to keep up with their own passions. You need “a life,” and you won’t have one if you lose yourself totally in your child’s world. Keep up with the piano, chess, painting, hiking, whatever. Teach your child about your avocations. Let her be a part of what you love. This is one of the most intriguing, emotionally rich forms of learning children get. You are building a common bond that will last for years.

Summer Car Safety Tips

According to kidsandcars.org, “On average, 38 children die in hot cars each year from heat-related deaths.” This fast-paced world is full of distractions and even the greatest parents have been known to forget that their little one is sleeping the back seat. Use the tips below from kidsandcars.org to ensure this never happens to your family.

  • Put something you will need, like your cell phone, handbag, employee ID, briefcase, etc., on the floor in the back of the car.
  • Get in the habit of always opening the back door of your vehicle every time you reach your destination to make sure your child is not in the car. This will soon become a habit. We call this the “Look Before You Lock” campaign.
  • Keep a large stuffed animal in the child’s car seat when it is not occupied. When the child is in the seat, put the stuffed animal in the front passenger seat. Anytime the stuffed animal is up front you know your child is in the child safety seat in the back.
  • Tell your child’s daycare center or babysitter that you will always call if your child will not be coming on a normally scheduled day.
  • When a child is missing, check your vehicles and car trunks immediately.
  • If you see a child alone in a vehicle, get involved. If they are hot or seem sick, get them out as quickly as possible. Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.

Family Picnic Time

Picnics are a great family outing and can become a treasured family memory. Grab the picnic basket and a blanket to introduce your children to the wonders of a family picnic.

What to pack (always consider age-appropriateness)

  • Frisbee, a ball for catch or a kite: Play first, eat later;
  • Bottled water or sippy cups with water;
  • Easy-to-pick-up veggies: Baby carrots, celery, cucumbers, peppers;
  • Fresh fruit: Slice it or cube it and put it in small individual containers;
  • Plastic utensils;
  • Pre-cut sandwiches: Use your favorite fillings on whole grain bread;
  • Pre-sliced cheese and whole-grain crackers;
  • Sunscreen;
  • Trail mix: Make your own with nuts, raisins, pretzels and dried fruit;
  • Wipes or hand sanitizer.

News Items

Capt’n Willie Visit!
7/12/12

Hot Dog Picnic!
7/18/12

Batman Visit!
7/25/12

Family Fun Carnival!
7/27/12
10:30 – 12:30pm

Carnival Open House!
7/28/12

 

Contact Us

105 Springside Dr.
Akron, OH 44333
www.goddardschool.com
330-665-3035
email: akrongoddardschool@gmail.com

The information in this newsletter is provided by Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) and is intended to provide general, helpful information to parents of children enrolled in Goddard Schools. Each Goddard School is independently owned and operated by a franchisee under a license agreement with GSI. From time to time, GSI will pass along information taken from outside sources regarding medical or other professional information. This information is taken solely from the sources identified and neither GSI nor its independent franchisees make any representation regarding its accuracy or completeness. This information should never be used without consultation with a professional advisor. For complete information, you should consult the sources identified in the newsletter and your own professional advisors.

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In The News: Big Referal Promotions at The Goddard School

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: 
Frank Monago
Owner
The Goddard School
330.665.3035
AkronOh@goddardschools.com

Big Referal Promotions at The Goddard School

 

Akron, Ohio (Grassroots Newswire) January 18, 2011 –The Goddard School in the Fairlawn area is offering big referral promotions this month.  The School is celebrating their 5th Anniversary and they want to give back to the families that have been loyal and give to those families that are new or returning to the School.  For any current family that refers a new family, both families save.  The current family will receive a free month’s tuition for the referral and loyalty.  The new family will receive a 50% discount on one month’s tuition.  Any family that re-enrolls will also receive a 50% discount.  “This is our way of saying thank you to all our families – current and new.”  said Frank Monago, owner and operator of The Goddard School. 

The Goddard School is a year round preschool and children can enroll at any time.  They offer part time and full time schedules with a 2, 3, 4 or 5 day option.  The lead teachers are university degreed and they create their own lesson plans based on the developmental guidelines and the Goddard Resources.  The Goddard Resources include Yoga, Spanish, Sign Language, Art History, World Cultures and Geography and many more. 

Please call 330.665.3035 to set up a time to visit the School, meet the teachers and see the curriculum in full swing. 

 

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com

Recently named #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States, by Entrepreneur magazine, for the tenth consecutive year (January 2011) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales), by Franchise Times, for the fourth consecutive year (October 2010); Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) is expanding The Goddard School® network throughout the United States. Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI currently licenses 370+ franchised schools with more than 43,000 students in 34 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier educational childcare provider in the United States.

 

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In The News: The Goddard School® located in Akron will participate in a Holiday Donation Drive

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Frank Monago
The Goddard School® located in Akron 
330-665-3035
goddardowner@frontier.net

The Goddard School® located in Akron will participate in a Holiday Donation Drive

Akron, Ohio (Grassroots Newswire) November 10, 2010 — The Goddard School located at 105 Springside Drive in Akron will be the host to a Holiday Donation Drive for Haven of Rest.

The Goddard School located in Akron opened in November, 2005 and is owned and operated by Frank Monago.  The school accommodates 134 children, ages six weeks to six years old. 

The staff, children, and famlies of The Goddard School are participating in a Holiday Donation Drive to help families in need from The Haven of Rest. They will be taking donations of toys, clothes, and non-perishable items throughout the holiday season. Staff and families of The Goddard School as well as the public are encouraged to donate. Unwrapped items can be dropped off at the school Monday through Friday from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm.

“We are all delighted to help these families ,” says Monago.  “The teachers and children are anticipating a lot of fun and a great learning experience.”

The Goddard School offers a program that focuses on building a strong and balanced foundation of emotional, social, cognitive and physical skills for each child.  Goddard provides children with a nurturing environment and a curriculum that encourages learning through play. Families have the convenience of extended hours from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm, the flexibility of either half or full-day schedules and Quality Assurance standards that are monitored corporately.

Parents are encouraged to drop in for a tour or call Liz Richardson, Center Director, directly to arrange a personal appointment at 330-665-3035.

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com

Recently named #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States, by Entrepreneur magazine, for the ninth consecutive year (January 2010) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales), by Franchise Times, for the fourth consecutive year (October 2010); Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) is expanding The Goddard School® network throughout the United States. Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI currently licenses 360+ franchised schools with more than 43,000 students in 34 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier childcare provider in the United States.

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In The News: The Goddard School® located in Akron Participates in Adopt-A-Family for Christmas

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Frank Monago
The Goddard School® located in Akron 
330-665-3035
goddardowner@frontier.net

The Goddard School® located in Akron Participates in Adopt-A-Family for Christmas

Akron, Ohio (Grassroots Newswire) November 10, 2010 — The Goddard School located at 105 Springside Drive in Akron will be the host to Adopt-A-Family.

The Goddard School located in Akron opened in November, 2005 and is owned and operated by Frank Monago.  The school accommodates 134 children, ages six weeks to six years. 

The staff at The Goddard School is adopting a family from ACCESS in Akron for the holidays. The staff will recieve a wish list from a family in need and take up a collection to purchase the items on the list.

“We are all delighted to help these families in need ,” says Monago.  “The teachers and children are anticipating a lot of fun and a great learning experience.”

The Goddard School offers a program that focuses on building a strong and balanced foundation of emotional, social, cognitive and physical skills for each child.  Goddard provides children with a nurturing environment and a curriculum that encourages learning through play. Families have the convenience of extended hours from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm, the flexibility of either half or full-day schedules and Quality Assurance standards that are monitored corporately.

Parents are encouraged to drop in for a tour or call Liz Richardson, Center Director, directly to arrange a personal appointment at 330-665-3035.

 

 

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com

Recently named #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States, by Entrepreneur magazine, for the ninth consecutive year (January 2010) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales), by Franchise Times, for the fourth consecutive year (October 2010); Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) is expanding The Goddard School® network throughout the United States. Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI currently licenses 360+ franchised schools with more than 43,000 students in 34 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier childcare provider in the United States.

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Outdoor Activities & Park Play with Your Children

A day at the park may seem like ‘just another day,’ but learning and bonding experiences flourish at the park!

Pack for Safety

Drinking water, sunscreen, hat, water to wash as well as wipes for hands, sneakers or other closed-toed shoes, a change of clothes or a towel for the seat, small first aid kit for those little scrapes and a small trash bag to keep the earth litter-free are all important.

Expect to Get Dirty

Going outside is about the freedom to explore and the only way to explore is to touch it, and yes, it is dirty – it’s outside! Dirty does not mean ‘germy’. Roll in the grass, stomp in the mud, touch the frog and splash in the puddles.

Infant to Six Months

  • Pack for safety: A blanket to crawl on and a sturdy pair of pants for crawling on rough surfaces. Be prepared to change diapers on the go.
  • Be prepared to climb and crawl yourself. This is the best way for you to ensure your child’s safety. Watch for items going into your child’s mouth.
  • Hydration: the outside air and activity increases the amount of fluids you both need to consume. And while you’re packing the water, pack a snack.
  • Point, name and describe: As your child explores, point out the details; name objects and talk about your experience.

 

First Steps (12 to 18 months)

  • Pack for safety: Bring a blanket and a sturdy pair of pants for crawling on rough surfaces. This is not the place for skirts or dresses.
  • Plan for breaks and pack snacks, water and a few books.
  • Dig and touch: Collect items to further explore when you get home.
  • Walk the trail with your little one on a riding toy. Don’t forget the helmet.
  • Park Play Etiquette: If your little one finds a playmate, ask the other parent if both of you may join in the play. Your child will learn to ask for your approval before playing with strangers and the parent of the other child will appreciate this overture.

 

Toddler and Get Set (18 to 36 months)

  • Plot the potty path!
  • Bring balls to throw and kick or bean bags and a bucket.
  • Move beyond the park and walk a trail or explore a nursery. Go to the stream, lake or pond and skip rocks. Turn the rocks over to find creepy, crawly things.
  • No breaks required – but pause for a moment to re-hydrate.
  • Look through binoculars – even two toilet paper tubes offer a new view of the world.
  • Tent it! A pop up tent is an instant playhouse.
  • Take an umbrella and put on your galoshes – take a walk in the light rain.

 

Preschool to Pre-K (36 months +)

  • Lie down and look up: Children like to see the world from a different perspective.
  • Picnic: Let your child be a part of packing the necessities and preparing the sandwiches.
  • Play “I Spy” or “I Hear.”
  • Read or draw under the trees.
  • Bring a magnifying cup for bugs and objects to view. Research your bugs and objects when you return home to learn more about each.

 

Go outside all year long – visit http://www.scdconline.org/PDF_files/weatherwatch.pdf to know what is considered safe outdoor weather for children.

Article courtesy of The Goddard School. To learn more about The Goddard School, please click here.

Choosing A Summer Program

According to research conducted by the National Center for Summer Learning, which is based at the Johns Hopkins School of Education in Baltimore, Maryland, summer learning loss accounts for about two-thirds of the difference in the likelihood of a student pursuing a college preparatory path in high school. As these findings indicate, keeping children’s brains challenged throughout the summer is crucial, since the lack of learning that occurs during these months has both short-term and long-term consequences.

Keeping a child’s day consistent throughout the summer months keeps the brain focused and helps prevent learning losses during the summer. In addition, this can potentially ease the anxiety that often accompanies transitioning into a new classroom or school come fall.

Research has shown that programs like The Goddard School that have specific learning goals, use learning and developmental standards and are age-appropriate are ideal in preventing summer learning losses. 

 

Tips for Choosing a Summer Program:

  • Choose a program that is based on each child’s interests and natural curiosity – this allows children the opportunity to direct their own learning.
  • Ask for credentials, experience and training of the teachers/counselors.
  • Check the health and safety practices of the program.  Make sure you are comfortable that the program will be able to handle your child’s unique needs.
  • Inquire about the daily schedule of the program.  Does the program combine songs, stories, exploration, art, physical activities and learning adventures in a safe, nurturing environment?  Ask how much freedom a child has to choose activities.
  • Ask for references.

 

 Article courtesy of The Goddard School. To learn more about The Goddard School, please click here.

Integrating Emotion & Learning in Everyday Moments

By Dr. Kyle Pruett

Excerpt from Me, Myself and I

Your own ideas about how to integrating emotion and learning in everyday moments with your child are probably better than anything I could advise for you personally.  But here are some ideas and suggestions that might help you customize those ideas.

 

  • Talk with your child.  Hopefully, you have been doing that since the moment she was born.  Chat with her about what you and she are doing.  She’ll become part of the conversation sooner if you express to her what you love about being a parent.
  • Encourage curiosity and understand that repetition is a good thing for him, boring though it might be for you.  The neurological basis for the insistence on the familiar lies in the fact that when synaptic connections are repeatedly activated by the same stimulation, they become immune from elimination during the brain’s pruning process.  They survive to become permanent neural connections that enhance learning.  So go ahead and do what your child likes – over and over.  This is a good rut to be in.
  • Simply being nearby and available while your child plays on his own is so important, as is your willingness to interact.  So get down on the floor and stay awhile.  Of course, this is hard for working parents, but the effort is worth it.
  • Nothing beats reading.  Children don’t learn interactive, conversational language from TV because it does not respond to them.  Language and eventually reading are learned from being actively engaged in speaking and reading with others – hearing parents and caregivers talk to each other and waiting for the child to respond.
  • Children learn best in the context of their daily lives and when the amount and kind of stimulation fits their temperament, level of development, interests or preferences, and mood.  Pressure to perform or conform to high expectations can lead to stress that can sabotage learning through burnout and confusion.
  • Young children do not need to be taught how to think.  Science is careening ahead pursuing fascinating findings and ideas about how, even whether, children this age actually do think.  But our ignorance dominates our knowledge embarrassingly.  We are still understanding why they even want to think in the first place.  It is like walking or talking, unfolding in due course when the maturational timekeeper tells the mind-body duality, “Johnny: it’s time?”
  • The five-second check-in.  Since most of us don’t spend our days staring endlessly at our toddlers and preschoolers, it is important that you take a few seconds to assess the mood, or state your child is in before you join in his doings, ask him to do something or simply interrupt him.  This is the feeling state that will determine his ability to understand or comply with whatever you might need, no matter how small.  If you are not tuned in, he probably won’t hear (i.e. learn).
  • Join your child.  Follow her lead in activities she is already involved in.  Don’t take over – it will turn her off.  But if you want her to learn, become a partner in the exploration she has begun.  Add a ball to hide in the pots and pans scene, or move close and take her hand if she is wary of a dog on a walk.  Don’t instantly rescue (unless safety is an immediate concern) because you will lose one of those interesting moments of tension that could be mastered, leading a child to a wider, more complex understanding of the world.
  • If your child balks at a “learning” moment with you, it could mean you didn’t read the five-second check-in right.  Back up and let your child know you know what she is feeling first.  (“I guess you weren’t quite through,” or “It’s hard to have to stop when you are having fun doing X.”)  When the feeling domain feels appreciated, then the learning domain is less burdened.
  • If your child needs redirection after you have connected with his mood or feeling, ask softly what he might enjoy doing.  If you still have no luck make two suggestions of things he might do and help him choose.  He will probably need some pump-priming from you, since you can manage your own mood apart from his.  Remember, how you are in such moments, is as important as what you do.
  • If it’s important for you to initiate an activity that will bring you pleasure and you know it could be good for your child, like reading or going for a walk, stabilize your own mood first.  Only then can you help your child regulate hers.  Once done, then she can crawl up on your lap or get out the door and learn.  For some kids, it’s the other way around.  But for the majority, in the feeling and learning dance, it isn’t always possible to say who is leading.

The Goddard School’s First Annual Silent Art Auction

The Goddard Schools in both Akron and Jackson Township, Ohio held their first annual Art Auction to benefit the Walk for Babies for the Akron Children’s Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). 

The children at the schools studied art and artists throughout the month of March. Each class then discussed their favorite artist or style and then re-created famous pieces of art to be auctioned off to the highest bidder. 

Sam and Shelby Snellenberger, creators of the Walk For Babies, a charity for the NICU, were invited to come to the Akron school to check out the artwork.  They even bid on a few pieces.

The Art Auction was a huge success raising close to $1700!  The staff and children at The Goddard School are honored to make this dontion to Walk For Babies.

Walk for Babies is an annual walk that was created by an extremely thankful family that had a baby in the NICU for one month in Akron Children’s Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).
The first walk was held in 2007, and so far about 1700 people have come out to walk, and collectively we have raised about $150,000! 100% of you money donated will go to the NICU at Akron Childrens Hospital.
In 2010, the walk will be held on Sunday, September 19th, at the Akron Zoo. This 1 mile, non-competitive walk will start at 9 am with registration starting at 8 am. If you would like to support the walk or volunteer please visit us online at
www.walk4babies.com

 

In The News: The Goddard School® located in Akron participated in its First Annual Art Auction

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Karen Marinos
The Goddard School® located in Akron 
(330) 665-3035
goddardowner@verizon.net

The Goddard School® located in Akron participated in its First Annual Art Auction

Akron, Ohio (Grassroots Newswire) May 20, 2010 — The Goddard School located at 105 Springside Drive in Akron was the host to a Silent Art Auction benefiting the Walk For Babies for the Akron Children’s Hospital Neonatial Intensive Care Unit (NICU) on April 19-23rd from to .

The Goddard School located in Akron opened in November, 2006 and is owned and operated by Karen Marinos and Frank Monago.  The school accommodates children, ages six weeks to 6 years. 

The children at the school studied art and artists throughout the month of March. Each class then discussed their favorite artist or style and then re-created famous pieces of art to be auctioned off to the highest bidder. Sam and Shelby Snellenberger, creators of the Walk For Babies, a charity for the NICU, were invited to come to the Akron school to check out the artwork. They even bid on a few pieces.

“We were all delighted to raise over $1600 ,” says Marinos.  “The teachers and children were anticipating a lot of fun and a great learning experience.”

The Goddard School offers a program that focuses on building a strong and balanced foundation of emotional, social, cognitive and physical skills for each child.  Goddard provides children with a nurturing environment and a curriculum that encourages learning through play. Families have the convenience of extended hours from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm, the flexibility of either half or full-day schedules and Quality Assurance standards that are monitored corporately.

Parents are encouraged to drop in for a tour or call the Director directly to arrange a personal appointment at (330) 665-3035.

 

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com

Recently named #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States, by Entrepreneur magazine, for the ninth consecutive year (January 2010) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales), by Franchise Times, for the second consecutive year (October 2008); Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) is expanding The Goddard School® network throughout the United States. Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI currently licenses 360+ franchised schools with more than 43,000 students in 39 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier childcare provider in the United States.

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    Documents and/or Photos available for this release:

Sam and Shelby Snellenberger, creators of The Walk For Babies with Karen Marinos, the owner of The Goddard School in Akron, participated in the First Annual Silent Art Auction.

To view supporting documents and/or photos, go to www.enr-corp.com/pressroom and enter Release ID: 256941

In The News: Private Kindergarten Program is Offered at The Goddard School® located in Akron 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: 
Karen Marinos
The Goddard School® located in Akron
330-665-3035
www.goddardschools.com

Private Kindergarten Program is Offered at The Goddard School® located in Akron
 

Akron, Ohio (Grassroots Newswire) 3-5-10 — The Goddard School located at 105 Springside Drive in Akron is offering a Private Kindergarten program.

Our full day program runs from 9am to 3:30pm. Before and after school care is also available. We have a certified Kindergarten teacher who goes above and beyond to follow the State Standards to get your children ready for first grade.

“Our credentialed teachers deliver a curriculum which combines the goals and methodology of  the surrounding school district with developmentally appropriate practices required by The Goddard School.  The size of our Kindergarten provides individualized attention for our children,” says Karen Marinos, owner of The Goddard School located in Akron.

The Goddard School offers a program, for children ages six weeks to 10, which focuses on building a strong and balanced foundation of emotional, social, cognitive and physical skills for each child.  Goddard provides children with a nurturing environment and a curriculum that encourages learning through play.  Families have the convenience of extended hours from 7 am to 6 pm, the flexibility of either half or full-day schedules and Quality Assurance standards that are monitored corporately.

Parents are encouraged to drop in for a tour or call the director directly to arrange a personal appointment 330-665-3035.

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com

Recently named #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States, by Entrepreneur magazine, for the ninth consecutive year (January 2010) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales), by Franchise Times, for the second consecutive year (October 2008); Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) is expanding The Goddard School® network throughout the United States. Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI currently licenses 360+ franchised schools with more than 43,000 students in 37 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier childcare provider in the United States.

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In The News: Amazing Animals is offered as a Summer Program at The Goddard School® located in Akron  

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: 
Karen Marinos
The Goddard School® located in Akron
330-965-3035
www.goddardschools.com

Amazing Animals is offered as a Summer Program at The Goddard School® located in Akron
 

Akron, Ohio (Grassroots Newswire) 3/5/10 — The Goddard School located at 105 Springside Drive in Akron is offering Amazing Animals for a Summer Program.

Each week will be focused on a different animal theme such as Artic Adventures, Farm Friendly, Creepy Crawlies, and Friends By The Sea to name a few. We will also have special visitors throughout the summer such as a police officer, Mother Goose, Jesse The Bug Man, a dentist, and Capt’n Willie. Enjoy a safe, fun filled summer for your children packed with amazing activities created by our talented teachers! Take pleasure in Mad Science, Arts & Crafts, Music, Mystery Readers, Water Days, plus many more!

“Our customized summer program ensures children have fun by incorporating developmentally appropriate activities with the opportunity to socialize and build memories that will last a lifetime,” says Karen Marinos, owner of The Goddard School® located at 105 Springside Drive in Akron.

The Goddard School offers a program, for children ages six weeks to ten years old, which focuses on building a strong and balanced foundation of emotional, social, cognitive and physical skills for each child.  Goddard provides children with a nurturing environment and a curriculum that encourages learning through play.  Families have the convenience of extended hours from 7 am to 6 pm, the flexibility of either half or full-day schedules and Quality Assurance standards that are monitored corporately.

Parents are encouraged to drop in for a tour or call the director directly to arrange a personal appointment at 330-665-3035.

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com

Recently named #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States, by Entrepreneur magazine, for the ninth consecutive year (January 2010) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales), by Franchise Times, for the second consecutive year (October 2008); Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) is expanding The Goddard School® network throughout the United States. Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI currently licenses 360+ franchised schools with more than 43,000 students in 37 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier childcare provider in the United States.

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True Toys and Their Positive Effects on Children

True toys have no bells or whistles, they do not do anything and you do not turn them on. Most toys today have taken the fun out of imaginative play. Manipulating toys and giving them life develops reasoning and problem-solving skills as well as creates a base of simple knowledge of how things work.

 

Infants

Rattles – Fine motor development toy of the century. Grasping, repetitive motion that creates a desired outcome, music, hand-eye coordination and focusing visually on a moving object are all part of infant learning. Have rattles handy in a variety of colors, shapes, sizes and sounds.

 

One-Year-Olds

Blocks, blocks and more blocks – Spatial relationships, size and shape discrimination leads to early math skills, fine motor control as well as cause and effect. This true toy is fun at any age! A child may spend hours building and knocking down blocks while developing science skills including balance, gravity and concepts of weight.

 

Two-Year-Olds

Paint and play-dough – It is messy and that is why they like it so much. This tactile experience will open the doors of creativity and thinking. Let them mix the colors, use different tools and add to the experience by playing some music in the background. Finger paint, paintbrushes and textured paint can be mixed with a variety of painting surfaces for further explanation.

 

Three-Year-Olds

A ball – Look at everything you can do with a ball – kick it, catch it, sit on it, bounce it, dribble it, play alone or with someone. A ball develops gross motor skills, hand-eye coordination and encourages healthy practices. A child needs to learn to handle a ball before they can handle a pencil.

 

Four- to Five-Year-Olds

Dramatic Play – Dramatic play is more than dress-up. It is a shovel, a whisk, a pad of paper. It is a pile of dirt, an old tire and a cardboard box. The sky is the limit – if your children have seen it, they want to explore it. Cut the cord off an old landline telephone and let them look inside as the telephone repair man. True toys for a four year old are simply real life items. These toys will allow children to try on new personalities and play out roles.

 

Courtesy of Goddard Systems Inc.  Please click here for more information about The Goddard School.

In The News: The Goddard School® located in Akron will participate in a charity bake sale

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Kristin Kauker
The Goddard School® located in Akron 
330-965-3035
goddardowner@verizon.net

The Goddard School® located in Akron will participate in a charity bake sale

Akron, Ohio (Grassroots Newswire) December 11, 2009 — The Goddard School located at 105 Springside Drive in Akron will be the host to a charity bake sale for Akron Children’s Hospital on December 21-23rd from 8-9:30 am, 1-1:30pm and 4-5 pm to .

The Goddard School located in Akron opened in November 2005 and is owned and operated by Karen Marinos.  The school accommodates 266, ages six weeks to 6 years old. 

The children in Mrs. Kauker’s Kindergarten class discussed charities and different ways to help people. The children decided , on their own, to have a bake sale to help the children at Akron Children’s Hospital. The children will be helping their parents bake the treats and work the bake sale. The public is welcome to stop in to buy a tasty treat or just make a cash donation.

“We are all delighted to help Children’s Hospital ,” says Marinos.  “The teachers and children are anticipating a lot of fun and a great learning experience.”

The Goddard School offers a program that focuses on building a strong and balanced foundation of emotional, social, cognitive and physical skills for each child.  Goddard provides children with a nurturing environment and a curriculum that encourages learning through play. Families have the convenience of extended hours from 7 am to 6 pm, the flexibility of either half or full-day schedules and Quality Assurance standards that are monitored corporately.

Parents are encouraged to drop in for a tour or call the school directly to arrange a personal appointment at 330-965-3035. 

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com

Recently named #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States, by Entrepreneur magazine, for the eighth consecutive year (January 2009) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales), by Franchise Times, for the second consecutive year (October 2008); Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) is expanding The Goddard School network throughout the United States. Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI currently licenses 330+ franchised schools with more than 40,000 students in 37 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier childcare provider in the United States. 

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TIPS FOR A SAFE AND HAPPY HALLOWEEN

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Halloween is a happy, fun-filled holiday for families and provides inspiration for children to express creativity and manners!  Parents balance this enthusiastic learning opportunity, however, by providing safe and dependable environments – both at home and “on the trick-or-treat road.”

 

Pumpkin Decorating

Encourage your children to participate in pumpkin decorating activities.

  • A child-friendly and safe alternative to pumpkin carving is to provide children with markers or paint to decorate their pumpkins.
  • Use child-drawn outlines to carve the family pumpkins.  This is a ‘parent-only’ activity and should be conducted on a flat, stable surface.
  • Children can help remove the pumpkin insides using their hands or scoops. Clean up the messes as you go – slimy pumpkin insides can cause slipping hazards.
  • Use small, battery-operated lights designed for carved pumpkins in lieu of candles.  
  • Families who choose to illuminate their pumpkins with candles should use votives or tea-light candles. 
  • Candlelit pumpkins should never be left unattended and should be placed on sturdy surfaces, away from flammable objects.

 

Costumes

Children should let their imaginations go – this is the ultimate creative activity!  Resist ‘buying’ a boxed costume for your children (and don’t be afraid that you’ll have to roll out grandma’s sewing machine). In order to make costumes safe, consider the following:

  • Costumes, masks, beards, wigs and other accessories should be flame resistant.
    • Masks may obstruct vision and could restrict breathing. Consider applying face paint or cosmetics instead.
    • Ensure masks fit securely and have eyeholes large enough to allow full vision.
    • Avoid hats that could slide over children’s eyes.
    • Knives, swords or similar costume accessories should not be sharp or rigid; rather they should be made of soft, flexible materials.
  • Avoid loose, baggy or long costumes to prevent tripping.
  • Children should wear sturdy, fitted footwear – oversized shoes and mother’s high heels are not ideal for safe walking.
  • Trim costumes and trick-or-treat bags with reflective tape to make them visible to motorists.

 

Treats!

Before the ‘treats,’ plan an easy and filling dinner.  Pasta with veggies or macaroni and cheese with a salad will fill tummies before the evening takes off. 

 

You’ll remember this one, “Do not eat any candy until you bring it home and we have thoroughly inspected it.”  Times haven’t changed much – same credo for your children! 

  • All treats should be carefully examined by adults for evidence of tampering. Any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items should be discarded.

 

Interested in making the evening more memorable and less scrutinized for the children in your neighborhood?  Be a role model:

  • Avoid distributing treats considered choking hazards (e.g., gum, peanuts, hard candies and small toys).
  • Non-food giveaways such as coloring books, notepads, stickers, crayons and toothbrushes are all good ‘candy’ alternatives.

 

Trick-or-Treating

Trick-or-Treating is a two-way street.  Neighbors are responsible for each others’ children and parents are responsible for their own children.

 

Your Children’s Safety:

  • Young children should always be accompanied by parents or other responsible adults.
  • All children and escorts should carry flashlights with fresh batteries.
  • Only homes with outside lights ‘on’ should be visited.
  • If you allow older children to go trick-or-treating with a group of friends, discuss safety precautions and agree upon a specific time when they should return home.
  • Remind children to stay on sidewalks and not to cross through yards or between parked cars, to only approach well-lit homes and to never enter a home or car for a treat.

 

Your Neighborhood’s Safety:

  • Prepare your home to receive trick-or-treaters.  Clear your lawn, sidewalk, steps and porch of obstacles or potential tripping hazards.
  • Sweep wet leaves away from stairs and walkways to prevent slipping.
  • Candlelit pumpkins should be kept away from areas where costumes could brush against flames.
  • Pets should be restrained to keep children from being jumped upon or bitten.

 

After-Party

Host a post-‘treating’ event at your home.  Invite neighbors (parents and children) and serve hot chocolate and dessert.  This is a wonderful opportunity to socialize and build memories!

 

Additional Resources: The American Academy of Pediatrics (www.aap.org), National Safety Council (www.nsc.org) and U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (www.cpsc.gov).

 

To learn more about The Goddard School, please click here.

Sleep

by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D.

Children’s sleep issues are among the more challenging developmental stages for parents to master. But biology is on the parents’ side in this one, because sleep patterns mature over time just like other developmental skills.

 

  • Polls tell us that one-third of American children and their parents sleep together some or most of the time before children start school. Co-sleeping varies hugely by culture and ethnicity. So think about what you want to do, and discuss the pros and cons with your pediatrician.
  • Make sure your crib is safe (locking rails), that your older child’s ‘big bed’ has side rails, and if you are co-sleeping, that there is plenty of room.
  • The human brain is active during sleep, but the deepest sleep is typically at the beginning of the night. Babies spend more time than older children in stimulating REM sleep, with eye movements and irregular breathing. Don’t worry about all that action in your child’s body – it too is growth.
  • Start them young – do not ignore the importance of naps, watch for the yawn, and start bedtime early in the evening.
  • The transition from crib to bed is also a time of sleep pattern changes, but most kids want it to work.
  • To instill good sleep habits remember that consistency matters so much:
    • Bath Time
    • Goodnights
    • Tuck and Talk Bedtime Story
    • Lullabye (yours are best)
    • Goodnights

 

This all sounds well and good, but it is a rare family that hasn’t had to handle some sleep trouble along the way. If your family is trying to re-establish a lapsed routine, stay calm and reassuring. We almost all need more sleep than we get, and it is a tremendous gift to our children to teach them how to sleep well.

 

Suggested Resource: American Academy of Pediatricshttp://www.aap.org

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Kyle D. Pruett, M.D. is an advisor for The Goddard School®.  Dr. Pruett is an authority on child development who has been practicing child and family psychiatry for over twenty-five years.  He is a clinical professor of child psychiatry at Yale University’s Child Study Center. 

 

 

To learn more about The Goddard  School, please click here.

TV Time

by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D

 

Are you surprised that the American Academy of Pediatrics says no television before age two? This standard alerts parents of infants, toddlers and preschoolers that their children are strongly affected by the talking tube and that they need to consider the way their children are exposed to its powerful influences.

 

  • If you chose to allow your children to view television, consider limiting the amount of “watching time” in their first three years to 30-90 minutes per day. This is more than enough for their young brains and eyes. Children prefer, and benefit from, interacting with people far more.
  • The programming you chose should be specifically directed at the age of your child.Most good parenting magazines regularly publish guidelines that tend to be more objective and reliable than an advertiser’s suggestions.
  • Commercial-free is far better for eyes, ears, and minds.  Fewer interruptions and a generally higher level of intellectual and emotional content are the benefits.
  • A child’s room does not need a television. Television may inhibit a child’s desire to read and play imaginatively for years.
  • When your children watch television, watch with them.  They may need your help to decipher the barrage of messages, and only you know when they have had enough. Occasional babysitting by means of television so you can get something done is understandable, but may be a waste of your child’s time and mind.

 

These guidelines should be discussed regularly by all adults in your household. The evening news may matter to the grown-ups, but it is frequently incomprehensible and somewhat frightening to your little ones. Media-literate parents are great blessings to their children.

 

Suggested resource: Coalition for Quality Children’s Media www.cqcm.org

 

Kyle D. Pruett, M.D. is an advisor for The Goddard School®.  Dr. Pruett is an authority on child development who has been practicing child and family psychiatry for over twenty-five years.  He is a clinical professor of child psychiatry at Yale University’s Child Study Center.

To learn more about The Goddard School, please click here.

Preventing Summer Learning Losses

The Goddard School stresses the importance of maintaining daily structure and learning during “carefree” summer months

 

As the school year comes to a close, it is only natural for kids to look forward to the leisurely nature of the summer season. The arrival of beach trips, pool parties and sleepovers, however, doesn’t mean that children should depart completely from their daily routine. Keeping particular elements of a child’s day consistent throughout the summer months keeps the brain focused and helps prevent learning losses during the summer. In addition, this can potentially ease the anxiety that often accompanies transitioning into a new classroom or school come fall.

 

According to research conducted by the National Center for Summer Learning, which is based at the Johns Hopkins School of Education in Baltimore, Maryland, summer learning loss accounts for about two-thirds of the difference in the likelihood of a student pursuing a college preparatory path in high school. As these findings indicate, keeping children’s brains challenged throughout the summer is crucial, since the lack of learning that occurs during these months has both short-term and long-term consequences.

 

Routine provides structure, which is often lacking during the summer months when children all too quickly become detached from the lessons they learned throughout the school year. Maintaining a schedule throughout the summer supports an environment that is less of a contrast to the classroom and provides a healthy balance between building skills, play and rest.

 

Families can incorporate the following habits into their child’s day to encourage and maintain a routine throughout the summer season:

 

  • Early to bed, early to rise:  To the best extent possible, children should adhere to a regular bedtime each night and wake up at the same time each day. This will not only ensure proper rest but will establish a sense of discipline as well.
  • Clean up and get dressed:  Upon waking up, it is important that children brush their teeth, get dressed and perform any other hygienic tasks that they normally would before a school day. Allowing kids to stay in pajamas or dirty clothes longer than necessary can result in lazy behavior. 
  • Make eating an event:  Keeping a child on a consistent meal schedule is critical to maintaining a sharp body and mind. Establish specific times for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and sit with children at the table to encourage conversation while eating.
  • Take a rest:   If a child partakes in a scheduled nap time while at school, then he or she should be allotted time at home for regular rest as well. Make this time consistent, perhaps after lunch, and have the child rest in the same place everyday.
  • Perform daily chores:  Asking a child to help around the house is an ideal way to get them involved in a daily routine. A morning chore and an afternoon chore can convey a sense of responsibility and supply a sense of rhythm to the day.

 

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In addition to providing consistency, routines can present children with security and comfort as they adjust to the changes that come along with their new summer schedules. The purpose is not to create rigidity but to provide a flexible structure that establishes a sense of purpose kids need to grow and mature.

 

The Goddard School offers a year-round program for children from six weeks to six-years-old. Children are encouraged to develop at their own pace in a warm environment supported by a team of dedicated teachers. Goddard teachers plan summer days filled with developmentally appropriate activities that nurture each child’s independence.

 

 

About The Goddard School

The Goddard School (www.goddardschools.com) is a nationwide franchise of Goddard Systems, Inc. headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. With over 320 franchised schools nationwide and 42,000 children enrolled, Goddard is the fastest growing preschool in the United States. Goddard was recently recognized by Entrepreneur magazine as the “#1 Childcare Franchise” for the eighth consecutive year (January 2009) and Franchise Times magazine as one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales) for the second consecutive year (October 2008).

 

Traveling with Your Children

Traveling with the family is fun, but it’s important to be prepared. Here are some tips and advice for parents to consider before they travel with their young ones.

Infant to One Year

  • Plan for an active stretch. A rest stop break or a playground – let them walk or toddle for twenty or so minutes before climbing back in the car.
  • Fun: music, mobiles, bubbles and books.
  • Pre-measure formula into bottles and carry a room temperature bottle of water to mix on the go.
  • Be prepared for a mess – snacks, diapers, spit-up, etc. – small trash bag, wipes, hand sanitizer (for the adults), spare water, tissues, bib and a blanket.
  • Even if you are traveling by plane, a car seat can double as a feeding chair or nap location. Call ahead for a crib to be added to your hotel room.
  • Be prepared and do not overload yourself. If time allows, buy what you can when you get to your destination.

First Steps (12 to 18 months)

  • Many of the Infant travel tips apply here.
  • Use “links” to keep toys within your child’s reach.
  • Even in the cool weather, crack a window for fresh air. Stale air may make your little one grumpy. Remove heavy jackets and shoes for comfort.
  • Fun: Music, books, stuffed animal, play mirror and foam shapes that will “stick” to the car seat. In an airplane – purchase headphones for music and rest it on your child’s shoulders instead of over their ears.
  • Have some active playtime just before leaving and plan for frequent stops. In an airplane, let children walk down the aisle periodically at their own pace.
  • Airports can be a bustling place. This may be the one time you check your luggage at the curb. This way you can focus on your little one’s needs without the hassle of luggage in tow.

Toddler and Get Set (18 to 36 months)

· Many of the First Steps travel tips apply here.

· Play window games – count the silos, trucks or red lights.

· Attach a mirror to the front passenger visor so you can see and interact with your toddler without having to spin around.

· Buckle up a toy bin right next to the children so they can help themselves – books, links, stuffed animals and puppets.

· Have your child help you pack a picnic lunch or snack and then serve it to everyone.

· A blanket can make a quick play space in any lobby, airport, etc.

Preschool to Pre-K (36 months+)

  • “I Spy” a blue car, a white truck and other objects you can see while moving.
  • Laptop desk for drawing with paper and crayons.
  • Car-Ride Checklist – make a picture itinerary of landmarks you will see along the way.
  • Ask your child to keep score – gas prices, mileage or count out toll money.
  • Play “I’m thinking of an animal.” Provide age-appropriate hints to help your child guess a particular animal.
  • If you’re using a hotel babysitter: 1. Check the sitter’s credentials, including criminal and/or child abuse clearances. 2. Check the room and the equipment in the room. 3. Carry your phone and check your phone service when you arrive at your destination.

For more information about The Goddard School, please click here.

This article courtesy of Goddard Systems Inc.

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