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5 SCIENTIFICALLY PROVEN WAYS TO RAISE SMARTER KIDS

These simple activities can improve your child’s intellectual development.

Setting children up for intellectual success later in life is high on the list of concerns for many parents, but amidst the everyday pressures of parenting, broad goals like “making your child smarter” can feel overwhelming and impractical. Fortunately, encouraging cognitive development doesn’t have to be complicated. Add a few of these proven activities to your child’s routine, and you’ll foster intelligence in manageable, positive ways.

1. Encourage playing outside.

Structured sports are wonderful for children, but making time for unstructured play is just as important, if not more so. Research has proven that unstructured play has an integral role in the development of social intelligence. As schools eliminate recess time, making sure your young ones have time to themselves outdoors is critical. Whether you usher them out the door to build an elaborate sledding hill, play hours of tag with their friends or head to the park for supervised play doesn’t matter; leaving them to set their own boundaries and interact with children their own age facilitates crucial prefrontal cortex development that they’ll draw upon in social situations for the rest of their lives.

2. Let them play video games.

When your kids do come inside, whether on a rainy day or a dark winter evening after school, don’t worry if they race straight to their gaming console. Moderating screen time is important, but as Cheryl Olson, Sc.D., asserts, video games—even those not made to be educational—offer myriad benefits to kids. From problem-solving to creative expression to social interaction with friends, video games challenge children and give them a rare sense of autonomy. After age 10, kids’ interpretations of complex games deepens and expands, but children under 10 aren’t exempt from the benefits of simpler games.

3. Make sleep a family priority.

If you need more motivation to set a sleep schedule and stick to it, let your kids be your inspiration. After the regimented sleep schedules of babyhood and the toddler years, letting bedtimes slacken when your kids reach school age is understandable. However, if those looser sleep schedules turn into patterns of insufficient sleep, your child will suffer, and unfortunately, many already do. Right now, as many as 20 to 25 percent of school-age children don’t get enough sleep.

That lack of rest affects their alertness, their attention spans, and their ability to concentrate in the classroom, which can have long-lasting effects on grades. According to the National Sleep Foundation, kids between the ages of 6 and 13 need nine to 11 hours, with older teens functioning best with eight to 10 hours each night. Consider limiting use of electronics before bedtime and creating a new nighttime routine with your child that takes their burgeoning independence and new hobbies into consideration.

4. Try music lessons.

Has your child ever expressed interest in music? If not, you may want to gently encourage it. Researchers at Northwestern University have found evidence of a link between music and literacy. The key, according to researchers, is that kids need to be active participants in music lessons. If children aren’t engaged with and creating music, they miss out on many of its benefits. Try talking to your child about enrolling in their school’s band or orchestra, or consider private lessons if they express interest.

Kids who do embrace making and learning music will gain “neurophysiological distinction” as they decipher differences between specific sounds. This heightened awareness of sounds carries over to improved literacy for many children, which is an indicator of intelligence both in the classroom and on standardized tests they’ll take later on.

5. Emphasize effort and hard work.

Decades of research on motivation and intelligence have led Stanford University’s Carol S. Dweck to conclude that for kids, an emphasis on effort and hard work has long-lasting, positive effects on intelligence. She asserts that praising children for being “gifted” or “talented” connotes an entitlement to success, leaving them lacking the motivation needed when concepts or good grades stop coming easily. Instead, recognizing your children for finding ways to solve problems or for following through on a difficult assignment teaches them that perseverance leads to positive results, and that success rarely comes easily—knowledge that will serve them well as they grow.

With a bit of strategy, you can introduce changes to your child’s routine that promote learning, problem solving, social skills and hard work—without replacing precious free time with flashcards and regimented learning. You’ll probably even find that many of these suggestions bring benefits to your child that go far beyond the classroom. Find an approach that works for you and your child, and remember that IQ is not the only indicator of future success.

—Kelsey Down

This story originally appeared on fairygodboss.com.


Kelsey Down is a freelance writer in Salt Lake City who has been featured on publications including Elite Daily, VentureBeat and SUCCESS. She’s covered fun stuff like why TV reboots need to stop and how to hack sleep as a workout, and she also writes about personal and family wellness. Follow her on Twitter @kladown23.

 

This article was written by Fairygodboss from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCredpublisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

How to Become an Expert Photo Organizer

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Whether you’ve got boxes of printed pics or you’re at full storage capacity with digital photos, these organizing tricks will help you keep track of your precious memories.

Printed Photos

Start by gathering, sorting, and identifying your photos, says Cathi Nelson, founder of the Association of Personal Photo Organizers and author of Photo Organizing Made Easy: Going from Overwhelmed to Overjoyed. Make one pile for album-worthy photos, one pile for art projects, and another for irreplaceable photos that will go in a photo-safe box. Use the 20/80 rule when sifting through photos: Keep 20 percent (the ones that tug at your heartstrings or help tell the story of your or the subject’s life) and toss the rest. Get rid of duplicates, blurry images, and most scenery shots. On the back of the photos, note the date, location, and people with a pencil (try Stabilo All pencils, which won’t bleed through). Then decide if you want to organize chronologically or thematically (birthdays, holidays, vacations) and what type of photo storage you’re going to use (archival photo box or binder). To hedge against damage or loss, scan your prints—services like Fotobridge can do it for you (up to 10,000 images at once) in about three weeks.

Digital Photos

Your most beloved images—scans of prints and ones you took digitally—should be stored in three places (think a flash drive, a computer, and a form of cloud storage). If you’re overwhelmed by zillions of digital photos, use Google Photos, which lets you search images by person, date, and place, so you can find what you need instantly without creating albums if you don’t want to. Make sure to set aside about 30 minutes every month to clear out clutter on your phone’s camera roll and complete a backup. When you’re done, pick some recent favorites to actually do something with: Post a video montage of your vacation on social media or print a few recent photos of your kids to send to older relatives who aren’t online.

 

This article was written by Tamara Kraus from Real Simple and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

 

10 WAYS TO EMPOWER YOUR DAUGHTER TO BE A LEADER IN STEM

Try these tips to help her overcome the typical barriers girls face.

We all know there is a gender gap in STEM. Women hold about 24 percent of STEM field jobs in the United States, and when you get into the leadership ranks the numbers are paltry. Even in the movies, only 12.5 percent of characters with STEM careers are female. Luckily, many groups—including my own, VentureLab—are working hard to engage girls in both STEM and leadership. Here are 10 ways you can get involved at home to empower your daughter to be a leader in STEM.

1. Encourage curiosity and experimentation.

Encourage your daughter to ask Why, How and What if…? If she asks a question like “how do clouds make thunder?,” go online with her to find the answer and the science behind it. Check out YouTube and find some easy to do at-home science experiments, like making slime out of various household materials. Even cooking together and trying different ingredients is a good way to experiment. A curious mind will not be afraid of trying new things and will not be afraid of asking questions that might lead to new innovations.

2. Make things.

Take on the mentality of a maker. Instead of buying something or waiting for someone to solve a problem, do it yourself. You can set up a mini maker space or crafting table in your house dedicated to creativity and messiness. Create a space where girls can explore their hobbies, experiment, and create. A maker’s space doesn’t need to be expensive. Use recycled cardboard, Styrofoam, yarn, art supplies, and any kid-friendly tools lying around your house. Girls who make things will learn to find resourceful ways of solving problems and will become doers and leaders.

3. Encourage a growth mindset.

Compliment girls’ efforts, not their intelligence. A growth mindset means that our brains can change and grow: we learn new things by practicing. When girls hear things like “You are so smart” they tend to believe that being smart is innate and not changeable. So, when they receive a not-so-great grade they believe they have failed. Instead, compliment girls’ efforts by saying “You worked really hard” or “I’m so proud. You didn’t give up on that math homework.” By complimenting girls’ efforts, we are priming them to do hard work and remain persistent despite challenges.

4. Make her “failure resistant.”

Redefine what she thinks of as failure. Help girls learn that everyone fails. It’s how you deal with failure that makes all the difference. When something doesn’t go according to plan, emphasize that failure is a part of the learning process! Failure is about testing hypotheses and practicing until you have mastered a skill. Give examples of times that things haven’t gone as well as you expected them to. If they are struggling because they are being challenged, that’s because they are trying something new!

5. Put her in front of people and ask for what she wants.

Help girls develop a more powerful presence by teaching them how to interact with adults and others. At home, practice with girls and show them how to introduce themselves, shake hands firmly, and make eye contact. At restaurants, have your daughter order for herself. The ability to confidently introduce herself and ask for what she wants will set her apart from the rest and serve her well later in her career.

6. Encourage her ideas and focus on her strengths.

In general kids are used to not having their ideas heard, so go ahead and encourage girls’ ideas no matter how silly or impractical they sound. Have her write her ideas down in an Idea Journal and get involved in the process if she is interested in pursuing a project. Even if her idea doesn’t work, she’ll know that she has your support and will keep trying new things. And if you see that your girl has strengths in math, science, art, or whatever it might be, encourage her to pursue those areas and sign up for classes or camps that will hone her skills. A little bit of encouragement goes a long way for girls and will set them up for success.

7. Find role models and mentors.

Sometimes it’s hard to picture yourself doing something until you see someone like yourself doing it. This can be particularly challenging in the STEM fields. Reach out to local women scientists and engineers and ask if they will speak to your daughter about their field of work and their experiences. If you don’t know any women scientists or engineers, check out FabFems.org for female STEM role models. And you can always study women role models from the past and present, like Mae Jamison, the first African American woman astronaut, or Mary Barra, engineer and CEO of General Motors. Such models help inspire girls and show them that they too can pursue STEM fields.

8. Solve meaningful problems around you.

Girls become more engaged in STEM when they see how it can be applied to helping people and the planet. Help girls link math and science to real-world problems. Support her and get involved, whether she wants to help build houses for Habitat for Humanity or just build a birdhouse. Show her how engineering and math is involved. Or maybe she is interested in the environment and sustainability and wants to build a hydroponics unit. Discuss the science behind hydroponics and plant growth.

9. Just play!

We tend to take kid’s play for granted, but so much learning, experimentation, and creativity comes from play. With play there is no judgement, no fear of failure, and often no right or wrong answers. Yes, some games have winners and losers, but it is part of teaching rules and strategy. Expose girls to tech toys, like Ozobots or Dash and Dot, to learn about coding. Play with Snap Circuits or littleBits to create all sorts of electronic inventions. Build with Legos and toys that use the imagination. Even cardboard boxes are great to play with and turn into forts, or she can create her own games out of recycled cardboard. Learning through play is a great way to internalize important concepts and stimulates the whole brain.

10. Watch unconscious bias and gender learning differences.

Even if STEM isn’t your forte, be mindful of how you speak about it. If they hear, “We’re just not math people” or “Science is hard,” kids pick up on these cues. Approach STEM with a curious mindset and learn with your daughter. As parents, we may also unconsciously steer our daughters away from adventure and experimentation. We tell boys to go climb trees, but we tell our girls not to get their dresses dirty. These messages affect the way girls see themselves and what they should and should not be doing. Help empower girls to enjoy STEM and be adventurous risk-takers.

 

This article was written by Cristal Glangchai Ph.D. from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

WHAT NUTRITIONISTS PACK THEIR KIDS FOR LUNCH

Courtesy of Cara Rosenbloom

Kids aren’t exactly known for their refined palates, which can cause issues for parents who want to pack healthy lunches for them to take to school.

But delicious and nutritious options are available ― and they don’t always take a long time to put together.

HuffPost asked a group of nutritionists what they pack in their children’s lunch boxes, and they shared their general guidelines and kid-approved dish ideas.

Edamame

“Like many parents, my wife and I work hard to find the balance between what our kids like and what is good for them. It’s important to us to reduce high-sugar and high-sodium options, which limits options, as many convenience foods tend to be saturated in these ingredients. It’s helpful for us to prepare healthier options at the beginning of the week and keep them in the refrigerator so they’re readily available and convenient when we need them. Our oldest daughter, as an example, likes edamame. Often, when we pack that in her lunch, she ends up sharing with friends who also like to eat them.”  ― Rick Hall, a clinical professor and registered dietitian at Arizona State University

Favorite fruits and veggies

“While my goal is to pack all five food groups in my preschooler’s lunch, I really strive to serve a fruit, vegetable and healthy protein option. My preschooler is given a snack at school that is usually a whole grain, so I load up on his favorite fruits (apples, grapes, bananas) and veggies (cucumber slices, red bell pepper sticks, carrots). And when it comes to protein, he loves individual hummus cups and crackers, or cheese and turkey roll-ups.” ― Katie Serbinski, a registered dietitian and founder of Mom to Mom Nutrition

“Vegetables and fruit top up my kids’ vitamin needs, and add variety and color. Kids eat with their eyes first!” ― Cara Rosenbloom, a registered dietitian and founder of Words To Eat By

 

Courtesy of Cara Rosenbloom

Healthier PB&J

“A typical lunch for our kiddos includes a half sandwich with peanut butter and instead of jelly, fruit like grapes, banana, pomegranates, etc. We combine our professional knowledge in nutrition with our practical knowledge of ‘what will my kids eat’ ― we also often have them help us make their lunches so they have a say in what goes in there. Building off the base of always having a fruit (in this case on the sandwich), veggie (usually to dip), protein (peanut butter) and grain (sprouted grain bread), they can pick and choose from what we have. They love helping and getting involved, and it also teaches autonomy and teaches them how to balance their plates.” ― Christopher Mohr, a registered dietitian and co-founder of Mohr Results with Kara Mohr

“I’m a firm believer in serving something familiar or ‘liked’ when it comes to school lunch, with both something healthy and ‘treats’ mixed in. School is a time when your child might be missing Mom or Dad, so their favorite PB&J or Cheerios trail mix every day isn’t the end of their diet. Just serve a new fruit or veggie with their dinner to make up for it!” ― Serbinski

Whole-grain pasta salad

“One family favorite is pasta primavera salad with roasted tomatoes and chicken with baby spinach. I use whole-grain pasta (bowtie or pinwheel) with tomatoes roasted with crushed garlic (fresh or canned); chicken (shredded or cubed, which I cook in bulk and freeze in individual portions); and pre-washed baby spinach, which I quickly wilt in the microwave (kids like it more than grown-up spinach). Then I add a little lemon juice and olive oil, which makes everything taste better, and toss it all together. For sides, we’re partial to golden kiwi or frozen or fresh chopped mango.” ― Melissa Halas-Liang, registered dietitian and founder of SuperKids Nutrition

 

Courtesy of Cara Rosenbloom

Chicken quesadillas

“One of my kids’ favorite items that my wife packs for them are spicy chicken quesadillas. She prepares them the night before school using organic tortillas, diced pre-cooked spicy chicken and a cheese blend. After cooking on a frying pan, we cut them into triangles and keep in the fridge overnight. They are easy to pack, hold and eat ― and the kids love them. They are often asked to trade with friends who want to eat them. It’s the most popular item we pack and super easy to make.” ― Hall

Yogurt

“I have two children who both have great palates, so I feel lucky that packing lunch is not too much of a challenge. Every day, I pack a mid-morning snack that usually consists of a Siggi’s yogurt tube or goat milk squeeze pouch, cucumbers, baby bell peppers and a portion with a side of hummus for my son. For my daughter, I pack a Siggi’s yogurt tube or goat milk squeeze pouch, cucumbers, berries, cherry tomatoes. On occasion I’ll swap the yogurt out for one hardboiled egg with seaweed.” ― Maya Feller, registered dietitian and owner of Maya Feller Nutrition

Dips for veggies

“We also pack mini peppers, cucumbers or baby carrots and hummus or guacamole to dip the veggies.” ― Mohr

“Sometimes I make Greek yogurt dip with veggies and whole grain crackers, chickpea salad and fruit.” ― Rosenbloom

“I keep pre-bought sliced jicama in stock and we make a lot of dips like this homemade ranch: 2 tablespoons of mayo, 2 tablespoons of nonfat Greek yogurt, 1 teaspoon parmesan cheese, half a teaspoon garlic powder and half a teaspoon dried parsley.” ― Halas-Liang

 

Courtesy of Cara Rosenbloom

Nuts (when possible)

“Other popular items for our kids include foods with peanut butter or nuts.  Unfortunately, they are sometimes limited in taking these foods because of nut allergies of classmates ― but nuts tend to be high in healthy fats and proteins that are both healthy and tasty treats.”  ― Hall

Bean and cheese sushi wrap

“A fun lunch is a bean-and-cheese sushi wrap. Spread mashed black beans with a bit of lemon juice on a whole grain tortilla, sprinkle shredded mozzarella cheese, and roll into a tight log. Cut slices just like sushi. Add in orange sunshine. Peel an orange and slice them into thick circles. Veggies would be edamame or sugar snap peas.” ― Halas-Liang

Bento boxes

“When my daughter was in preschool, she loved bento box meal assembly dishes, like smoked Gouda chunks with whole wheat woven crackers (with no added sugar), frozen peas or corn (which she ate frozen), berries or baked apple chunks. We microwaved the chopped apple, then chilled in the fridge. It keeps it from browning and it’s sweeter. We grow cucumbers well into late fall so we add those in too. It was always a hit!” ― Halas-Liang

Quality protein

“My background in nutrition has taught me that kids fare better in school ― both academically and physically ― when their lunch is nutritious and provides long-lasting energy. That’s why there is always a source of good-quality protein in their lunchbox (chickpeas, cheese, Greek yogurt, chicken, lentils, etc.) and some slow-burning, high-fiber whole grains, like quinoa, whole-grain pasta or oats.

My kids’ lunches are made with vegetables, fruit, whole grains and something high in protein. Some of their favorite combos are: cubes of chicken, grape tomatoes and cucumbers on a skewer, with whole grain crackers and fruit; a turkey or cheese sandwich with lettuce and tomato on whole grain, and fruit; and quinoa and bean salad with string cheese, carrots, peppers and fruit.” ― Rosenbloom

 

Courtesy of Cara Rosenbloom

Flavor, texture and variety

“When I’m building my kids’ meals I think about variety, temperature, texture, flavor and of course nutrition. Lunch is usually one of the following with a side of fruit and vegetable: bean and rice burrito, veggie dumplings (tofu and cabbage), soup with a side of fruit, spinach and cheese tortellini with a nut-free sauce (the school has a strong nut policy), homemade salmon salad with carrots and celery topped with tzatziki on a whole wheat English muffin, or a spinach and potato patty inside of a whole wheat English muffin.

Children are in a phase of growth and development and ideally their foods should support this. My goal for my children is to give them healthy options that they love, so they will eat and have the energy they need to focus and engage during school hours, play and continue to grow. I aim to send them with a tasty balanced meal that supplies vitamins and minerals from whole and minimally processed sources.” ― Feller

Leftovers

“Lunches for my children are nearly always leftovers from dinner the night before. I like to start with the vegetables first, such as sautéed broccoli, roasted Brussels sprouts, or cauliflower mash. We always supplement with additional vegetables, which are typically raw, such as avocado, cherry tomatoes, peppers (though never green ones) and celery. If we include animal protein in the lunch, it can be roasted chicken, hard-cooked eggs, lamb or beef ― basically whatever we may have had for dinner. If there is no animal protein available or if that’s not preferred, we add sunflower butter in an individual packets, raw almonds or walnuts, or hemp seeds. Juices, carbonated beverages, sweetened drinks and milk are never included. Always pure water.” ― Laura Lagano, a registered dietitian and owner of Laura Lagano Nutrition

“Family favorites include supper leftovers in a thermos (pasta, soup, stew) along with fruit (of kids’ choosing) and a couple of homemade cookies.” ― Katja Leccisi, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of How To Feed Your Kids: Four Steps To Raising Healthy Eaters

Dessert?

“People always ask about dessert. In an effort to encourage children to focus on vegetables first, I suggest not putting fruit in the lunch box until you’re certain that your youngster craves the vegetables. And, when you do include fruit, start by opting for the lower-sugar fruit such as organic strawberries and raspberries.” ― Lagano

“Sometimes I add a small treat, like some chocolate chips or my homemade no-bake granola bites.” ― Rosenbloom

“My kids always also get a dessert ― usually something homemade, like cookies, muffins or date squares.” ― Leccisi

 

Courtesy of Cara Rosenbloom

Safe choices

“When I pack my children’s lunches, I always think food safety first and include adequate ice packs to keep cold foods cold.” ― Halas-Liang

“My expertise in nutrition shaped my choices by thinking about food safety, temperature controls and balanced nutrition to prevent childhood obesity and reducing refined products. I also teach my kids to recognize foods as ‘everyday’ versus ‘sometimes’ foods. Therefore they are aware of what foods make them healthy eaters, readers and leaders.” ― Tambra Raye Stevenson, founder and culinary nutritionist at NativSol Kitchen

Rule of three

“I avoid the three S’s: stinky (like fish); sticky (like maple syrup); and soft drinks (too much sugar).” ― Rosenbloom

“For a balanced lunch, I aim for three plant-based colors, plenty of fiber and a good source of protein. ― Halas-Liang

Meal prep

“It’s not just about what you pack, but when you pack it. Make packing lunch the night before part of the nighttime routine ― for us, it’s eat dinner, clean up kitchen and pack lunches. You’re not rushed and can make better decisions vs. adding one more thing to the already crazy mornings as everyone is trying to get out the door.” ― Mohr

“I think it’s easy to get stressed out about packing lunch. To avoid this, I usually pack after dinner or during the after-school snack if I’m home. That way the food is already out. Plus I keep a few sets of containers, some of which are dishwasher-safe. I also don’t make everything from scratch, but do a lot of meal assembly! It’s quicker and with so many healthy options, like beans from a can or pre-washed spinach, it’s easier. And I like to include a quote or little note when I have time.” ― Halas-Liang

Quotes have been edited and condensed for clarity.

 

This article was written by Caroline Bologna from Huffington Post and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

2018 Science Fair at The Goddard School

On Thursday, January 25, 2018, we hosted a Science Fair Open House where the children became pint-size scientists and conducted science experiments throughout the school. The children had a scientific time!

 

New Year’s Resolutions

The start of every new year brings the excitement of the unknown and offers the opportunity for reflection on the year that has passed. The idea of a clean slate, even a new beginning, gives us the opportunity to create goals that we want to accomplish over the course of the next year.

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In 2018, you can make creating New Year’s resolutions a family event. Give your children a pen and paper for them to write out three goals that they want to accomplish. You can ask questions to help get them started:

  • What hobby, sport or instrument do you like?
  • What is your favorite food?
  • How many books did you read this year?

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While they develop their goals, work on a few of your own. Make this time together a chance for your children to experience your “grown-up” life. When all of you are all finished writing out your New Year’s resolutions, take turns reading them out loud to each other. Reasonable, well-thought-out goals can empower your children to achieve something that they had not considered before.

Tack up your lists on a pin board or put them on the fridge. Review them occasionally throughout the year to see how everyone is doing. At the year’s end, have a celebration, whether you hit your goals or not, and start planning for next year!

Hot Chocolate Recipe

A cold winter night and a cup of hot cocoa fit perfectly together for any occasion. Have a cozy night at home with your little one and share some silly stories over a cup of hot chocolate. Turn off all the lights except one and make shadows on the walls with your hands to put on a shadow-puppet show with your child. Read stories together or make up your own tales!

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Spice up your cup by following this recipe!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of warm milk
  • 2 packs of cocoa mix
  • A handful of mini-marshmallows
  • A dash of cinnamon
  • A topping of whipped cream

Directions

Heat up a cup of milk and add two packs of cocoa mix for that extra-delicious chocolate taste. Then, mix your ingredients well. Next, add a handful of marshmallows and a dash of cinnamon. Finish with a squirt of whipped cream on top.

What are your children’s favorite additions to their hot chocolate?

Pita Nachos

Need to make an after-school snack? Pita nachos make for a quick, satisfying treat.

nachos

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 whole wheat pita
  • Salsa
  • Grated cheddar cheese

Split pita into two rounds, then cut into wedges. Lay the wedges on a cookie sheet, then broil in an oven for a few minutes until golden. Sprinkle wedges with cheese and salsa, then broil again until cheese melts.

 

*An adult should oversee all recipes and activities. Recipes and activities may not be appropriate for all ages.

THE GODDARD EXPERIENCE

Children learn best through experience. We embrace this philosophy by helping children explore and discover their interests through play, so they become SCHOOL-READY, CAREER-READY and LIFE-READY.

This is part of our promise to you.

FIVE WAYS TO FOSTER CREATIVITY

The ability to be creative and think outside the box is important for problem solving and innovation, which are highly valued abilities. Here are five ways to encourage creativity at home.

  1. Read to your child. Before you begin, ask your child to close his eyes and imagine the story as you read it. Afterward, ask your child to describe what he saw while you read.Art
  2. Put on a play. Create a story with your child and then act it out. Encourage her to dress up like the character she is playing by using old clothes, hats and accessories. You could even record her performance and turn her play into a movie.
  3. Establish a play space. Set aside part of the basement, a spare bedroom or a corner of the living room where your child can explore and discover whatever interests him. If it gets a bit messy, try to be lenient with him since this space is meant for free play.
  4. Encourage free play. Free play is exactly what it sounds like – unstructured play time, a time when your child can play however she likes in the dedicated play space you’ve set up for her.
  5. Inspire your child’s inner Picasso. Keep plenty of art supplies such as paper, paints, paintbrushes, markers, crayons and modeling clay available in case your budding artist decides to create a masterpiece.

In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – May 2014

   May 2014  

Moral Behavior and Empathy by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

As with other aspects of behavior, moral behavior must be taught. One element of such behavior is the ability to empathize with others, to put oneself in someone else’s shoes. Obviously, empathy can help inhibit anti-social behavior.

There is some evidence that empathy is part of a child’s in-born temperament, and that some children are naturally more empathic than others. However, research also shows that empathic parents tend to have empathic children. So this important attribute is clearly shaped by example and teaching as well as by genes.

The ability to show children what it is to care about another’s well-being – physical and emotional – is central to teaching morality. It is also central to their self-control and their long-term ability to form lasting relationships.

Many childhood games are valuable for teaching connectedness, turn-taking and awareness of others. Peekaboo is a great example.

Observing Babies as They Learn

You love to watch your little one playing and learning, and so do Goddard School teachers. Observation is a core method our teachers use to assess what children are learning, when they are ready to learn new tasks and what their interests are. We use these observations to track the children’s progress, develop lesson plans and share the children’s development with their parents.

As parents, we often teach our children, yet they can teach us a lot while we observe them. Children will inform us of their needs and interests if we pay attention to them. You may want to keep a notebook or record your observations on your computer or tablet. Observe your child at different times of the day, such as at mealtimes and bedtime. Over time, your notes will form an interesting record of your child’s behavior at different ages and help you notice whether a pattern of behavior is emerging. When you notice that your child develops a new interest, try to nurture it without overwhelming your child. Think about ways you can introduce some new activities that will appeal to those interests.

Through observation, you will gain a better understanding of your child and create a record of special memories.

Mother’s Day Craft: Pocket Full of Kisses

With Mother’s Day just around the corner, here’s a craft that little ones can do (with an adult’s assistance and supervision, of course) to thank mom for all that she does.

What you need:

  • Two white paper plates
  • Crayons, washable markers and/or water-based paint
  • Hole punch
  • Yarn, ribbon or a long shoelace
  • Safety scissors
  • Bag of Hershey’s® KISSES®
  • Peel-and-stick magnets (optional)
  1. Cut one paper plate in half and leave the other one whole.
  2. Use the hole punch to punch holes, about one inch apart, along the straight edge of the cut plate.
  3. Put the plates together so that the outside edges match up (this will form the pocket). While they are together, continue to punch holes, about one inch apart, around the edges of both plates.
  4. Use the yarn, ribbon or long shoelace to sew the two plates together. (You won’t actually sew the straight edge of the cut plate to the full plate, but you can lace the yarn through these holes for decoration and added support.)
  5. Tie the ends of the yarn, ribbon or shoelace together when sewing is complete.
  6. Make a hole at the top and tie a piece of yarn or ribbon through for hanging on the wall or attach a few peel-and-stick magnets to the back for hanging on the refrigerator.
  7. Decorate with crayons, washable markers and/or water-based paint.
  8. When complete, fill the pocket with Hershey’s® KISSES® and present to mom on her special day! Once the KISSES® are gone, mom can continue to use the pocket for recipes, coupons or more candy.

News Items

Jr.Kindergarten/Kindergarten Graduation Pictures
May 2nd, 2014
8:00am-12:00pm

Mother’s Day Tea for Kindergarten
May 9th, 2014
11:30am-12:30pm

Spring School Pictures (Infants – Get Set)
May 14th, 2014
7:30am-12:00pm

Spring School Pictures (Preschool – Kindergarten)
May 15th, 2014
7:30am-12:00pm

Jr. Kindergarten/Kindergarten Graduation
May 17th, 2014
10am-11:30am/12:00-1:30pm
Autumn Leaves of West Houston

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: houstontx@goddardschools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – April 2014

   April 2014  

Early Speech by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Funny as early speech may sound, don’t exploit the humor of it at your child’s expense. Whenever a new skill emerges, it is at its most raw and tender (remember your first poetry recital?); stuttering and stammering are normal when children are learning to speak. Treat early language with the respect it deserves. It has taken tremendous effort to get there. Say it back correctly if you figure out what it is, but don’t “correct” too much. Be patient. Early language should feel good to both of you, and not because it’s right, but because it is intimate communication between two people who feel deeply connected to each other. Soon she won’t be saying much if her first words always are being corrected.

Choosing a Summer Program

Keeping a child’s day consistent throughout the summer months keeps the brain focused and helps prevent learning losses during the summer. In addition, this can potentially ease the anxiety that often accompanies transitioning into a new classroom or school come fall.

Research has shown that age-appropriate programs like The Goddard School, with specific learning goals and learning and developmental standards, are ideal in preventing summer learning losses.

Tips for Choosing a Summer Program:

  • Choose a program that is based on each child’s interests and natural curiosity – this allows children the opportunity to direct their own learning.
  • Ask for credentials, experience and training of the teachers/counselors.
  • Check the health and safety practices of the program. Make sure you are comfortable that the program will be able to handle your child’s unique needs.
  • Inquire about the daily schedule of the program. Does the program combine songs, stories, exploration, art, physical activities and learning adventures in a safe, nurturing environment? Ask how much freedom a child has to choose activities.
  • Ask for references.

Root for Earth with The Goddard School!

To plant the seeds of environmental awareness, Goddard Schools across the nation are hosting Root for Earth, a week-long celebration of conservation that features a variety of activities for promoting a healthier Earth for future generations.

The celebration kicks off on Monday, April 21. On Tuesday, which is also Earth Day, more than 400 Goddard Schools nationwide will turn off all non-essential lighting for one hour to symbolize their commitment for making a difference. The children will enjoy environmentally friendly activities throughout the week. Stop by from Monday, April 21 to Friday, April 25 to Root for Earth with us!

News Items

Puffy Clouds
April 2nd, 2014
10:30am

Class Spring Party
April 17th, 2014
10:30am-12:00pm

School Closed
April 18th, 2014
6:30am-6:30pm

Paper Plate Ladybug
April 23rd, 2014
10:30am

Muddy Pig
April 28th
10:30am

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, Texas 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: HoustonTX@goddardschools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – March 2014

   March 2014  

A World of Style – Developmental Benchmarks by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

The developmental benchmarks of early childhood – the “normal” times when certain skills are supposed to appear – can never do justice to the infinite variety of ways that development actually occurs. Yet it is tempting for parents to compare their children to charts and tables of “average” this or “typical” that. Moreover, comparison is inevitable in many childcare setting where parents can’t help but see how their child measures up to others. Concern about early learning can put added pressure on parents to watch for signs that language and cognitive development are “on schedule.”

However, from a practical point, timing doesn’t mean very much. The order of development of new skills is more important than the timing of the appearance of any one skill. Jargon before vocabulary, crawling before walking, sucking before drinking. Children pass through these gateways at vastly different rates.

As long as your child is progressing in each area, it doesn’t matter if he is a bit “behind” on something, and, satisfying though it may be, it doesn’t mean anything if he is a bit “ahead” on something else. For example, numerous studies have confirmed that the vast majority of children who talk later than average are just as smart and do just as well in school as early talkers. If is perfectly normal for a child’s interests and temperament to lead her further and faster in some areas than in others. It is also perfectly normal for these interests to change over time.

Benchmarks can be helpful, provided they are used as general guidelines. If you have concerns, check with your pediatrician. A good rule of thumb: don’t let other children’s progress get in the way of your respect for the individuality of your child.

Creatively Boost Confidence

Children need support and guidance to build and maintain a positive sense of self. As parents, we can facilitate this by helping them craft personal About Me collages that depict positive images and words that resonate with them.

To craft an About Me collage, you will need the following materials:

  • A workspace with enough room to spread out and work
  • A piece of cardstock or poster board, 8 1/2 inches by 11 inches or larger
  • A pair of child-safe scissors (parents can also help with any cutting)
  • Craft glue or a glue stick
  • Magazines
  • Copies of photos of your children

Help your children find images and positive words in magazines that describe them in a positive light. If your children are artistic, you might cut out an image of an easel or a famous artist they like. If your children are expressive, you could cut out images of a microphone or actors in a play. If your children are funny, you could cut out images of silly faces or funny words. Help your children use their imaginations to craft a one-of-a-kind collage they can hang in their bedrooms and see every day. You can work on this fun, confidence-building project with your children periodically over the years so you can look back and see how each child’s self-image has changed.

Breakfast “Cupcakes”

These great little Spinach and Cheese Omelet Cupcakes are an easy, grab-and-go breakfast treat and can be made ahead for busy mornings.

2 cups washed baby spinach
4 large eggs or the equivalent in egg substitute
2 egg whites
1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
A dash of salt and pepper
1 tsp. olive oil

Preheat your oven to 350°F. Spray a cupcake tin with cooking spray. Mix the spinach, olive oil, salt and pepper in a bowl. In a separate bowl, mix the eggs and egg whites. Add the eggs to the spinach mixture, and then add the shredded cheese. Mix well. Pour the mixture into each cup in the cupcake pan until the cup is halfway full. Bake until the omelets are fully cooked, which will take about 20-24 minutes. Let them cool about two minutes and serve them, or wrap them up in foil and store them in the refrigerator for the next morning. Reheat them in a microwave or toaster oven.

News Items

Paper Plate Car
March 7th, 2014
10:30am

Sink or Float
March 12th, 2014
10:30am

Cotton Ball Painting
March 18th, 2014
10:30am

Shape Rocket
March 25th, 2014
10:30am

Rain Sticks
March 31st, 2014
10:30am

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, Texas 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: DHoustonTX@goddardschools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – February 2014

   February 2014  

Managing Parental Emotions of Childcare by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Don’t pretend you’re fine when you’re not.
It’s much better to acknowledge your feelings. It’s normal to feel grief at this change. You will come through sooner and better if you face your feelings head on.

Don’t believe you are a bad parent for choosing childcare.
If you have chosen a good center or caregiver, you can be confident that your child is in good hands, so there is no logical reason to feel guilty. But if you continue to feel guilty, it’s important to come to grips with these feelings. Be especially alert if you are tempted to change your parenting style. For example, some parents start easing up on setting limits to compensate for their guilt. Such behavior leads nowhere you or your child want to go.

Don’t become critical of your child’s caregiver.
It’s important to have a good relationship with caregivers. Their observations and advice can be extremely helpful to your parenting. If you find you feel critical even though the caregiver’s work doesn’t merit such an attitude, recognize that your feelings are a part of the separation process. Then begin to focus on the caregiver’s talents and good qualities. Rest assured that no caregiver will take your place in your child’s life or heart. The new attachments to other warm and loving caregivers are beneficial. They also are good signs of your child’s emotional maturity and your achievement in nurturing that maturity.

Don’t underestimate the importance of the transition to childcare.
If you pretend the new routine doesn’t matter, you may underestimate the good things that can come from this new experience for your child and you–new friends, new learning, new sources of information and new ideas on parenting.

Celebrate Diversity

As toddlers and preschoolers, children are beginning to notice there are differences between themselves and others. While their observations are very broad at this point–a child may notice another child’s hair is different from his, but not quite know why–they are beginning to form their own ideas about what all these differences mean, and their natural inquisitiveness can lead to many questions.

To help your child understand, learn to respect and celebrate differences in others, guide him as he explores and learns from the diverse world around him.

  • Be open to his questions and provide clear, age-appropriate answers. Listen attentively and explain why certain words or thoughts are hurtful.
  • Embrace differences in others, don’t try to avoid them. Use books, music, games and food to explore different cultures together.
  • Set a good example through your positive relationships with others. Your little one will learn to accept and respect their peers, too.
    • Check local websites and activity guides for places you can hike, ski, sled, ice skate or snowshoe.
    • Romp in the snow and enjoy an exciting snowball fight.
    • If it’s too cold to be outdoors, consider indoor activities such as swimming, karate and dance.
    • Limit TV, video game and computer time to encourage your children to get active.
    • Set a good example. If you’re telling your children to get out and play, make sure you do, too!
  • Get Out and Play!

    Don’t let the chill in the air keep your children indoors and inactive this winter. Bundle up appropriately and get out and play!

News Items

Paper Plate Feeling Mask
February 4th, 2014
10:30

Heart People
February 10th, 2014
10:30

Friendship Party
February 14th
10:30am

Dental Floss Painting
February 18th, 2014
10:30am

Painting With Spoons
February 26th, 2014
10:30am

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, Texas
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: HoustonTX@goddardschools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – January 2014

   January 2014  

Temperamental Fit between Parent and Child by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

It is good to remind ourselves that our children are developing in very close proximity to us and to our own capacities to feel shame and invoke our consciences in useful, constructive ways. It will help to take a brief look at our own styles and think about how they will affect our children at this age.

The temperamental “fit” between parent and child plays a big role in the limit-setting process. If this process is to work well, the challenge is to keep drawing your child toward greater and greater self-control.

The fit or match between your style and that of your toddler will never be perfect, nor should it be. However, thinking about how you affect each other can greatly increase the ease with which you set limits for her and help her stay in control when she is threatening to “lose it.”

When you are well tuned to your child, both of you are likely to feel more in control. As a result, your child doesn’t have to resort to ever more dramatic tactics, like shutting down completely or running away.

By the same token, repeated misreading of what a child needs in the limit-setting realm, coupled with too little or too much discipline, leaves her feeling confused and that she has failed as a communicator. These feelings, in turn, lead to a sense of uselessness and hopelessness. So it’s a good idea to periodically reassess your style and that of your child to see where differences could be helpful or troublesome.

Teach. Play. Learn.

“In order to thrive in today’s world, children need to be equipped with 21st century skills. P21 applauds The Goddard School’s focus on developing these skills early so that students can be successful in and out of school.” – Helen Soule, Executive Director of P21

Between January 13 and February 15, 2014, Goddard School preschools across the country will celebrate 21ST century learning and innovation! The Goddard School has partnered with TINKERTOY®, an organization that manufactures educational STEM-focused toys for children three and older, for our national Teach. Play. Learn. event. Stop by your nearest Goddard School to imagine, create and build with your children and see 21st century learning skills in action!

Click here to locate and contact a participating Goddard School near you for event dates and times. And, as part of our partnership with TINKERTOY, families and friends of The Goddard School can enjoy a 20% discount at knex.com now through March 31, 2014 with coupon code goddard20.

Hearty, Healthy Breakfast

This healthy, balanced baked oatmeal is sure to help your little one feel full and energized.

Fruit-Infused Baked Oatmeal

(Makes about six servings)

1 cup rolled oats
1/2 tsp. baking powder
3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/4 cup sugar-free maple syrup
1 cup almond milk
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2 tbsp. butter, softened or melted
3 ripe bananas, sliced
1 cup fresh or frozen berries (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries)

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease a square or rectangular baking dish. Mix the oats, baking powder and cinnamon until they are well mixed. Combine the syrup, milk, egg and butter. Place the sliced bananas in a single layer on the bottom of your baking dish. Top the bananas with half of the berries. Pour the dry oat mixture over the fruit in an even layer. Then, pour the liquid ingredients evenly over the oats. Place the remaining berries evenly on top. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until the top is browned. Let the oatmeal cool a few minutes before serving it. If you make it the night before, cover it with a sheet of aluminum foil and place it in the refrigerator so you can reheat it in the morning.

News Items

Kool Aid Playdough
January 6, 2014
10:30am

Fruit Taste Guessing Game
January 14th, 2014
10:30am

Make Your Own Instruments
January 22nd, 2014
10:30am

Bubble Wrap Painting
January 29th, 2014
10:30am

Texture Collage
January 31st, 2014
10:30am

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-030
email: HoustonTX@goddardschools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – December 2013

   December 2013  

Is Technology Helping Children to Read by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

When our fifth-grader recently announced he was going downstairs to curl up with his mother’s old Kindle, I was stopped in my tracks by a delicious memory from five years ago, when my family used to curl up together with print books for a reading hour each Sunday night before bed. Today, that may seem like nostalgia. Half of American families own tablets, and many parents are wondering if co-reading e-books with children is a good thing.

Ten years ago, this was not a dilemma. Most parents thought that computers, laptops and DVD players were convenient for entertainment, but only a minority believed that technology was going to play a significant and positive role in their young children’s education at home or in school. However, with the increase in smartphone and tablet use during the last decade, most parents are now comfortable with digital learning. Still, many parents who are comfortable with the benefits of digital gaming and interactive problem-solving are less enthusiastic about using devices to help their children learn to read.

Parents highly cherish children’s ability to read, as they should. Our families and our communities suffer if children fail to master reading by the third grade. How can parents use digital tools to help their children develop literacy skills?

Parents value co-reading because it promotes interactive storytelling, enriches children’s vocabularies and stimulates parent-child conversations, but co-reading e-books may or may not provide the same benefits. Two recent Cooney Center QuickReports from the Joan Ganz Cooney Center, Comparing Parent-Child Co-reading on Print, Basic and Enhanced E-book Platforms (Chiong, Ree, Takeuchi & Erickson, 2012) and Co-reading with Children on iPads: Parents’ Perceptions and Practices (Vaala & Takeuchi, 2012) had three significant findings:

1) Print and basic e-books both elicited similar levels of content-related actions like pointing, labeling and talking about the story’s content. Enhanced e-books, however, prompted more non-content-related actions like pushing the parent’s hand away or talking about the device, with measurably less vocabulary growth and less pre-reading skill building. While enhanced e-books appeal to children, they don’t enrich the essential parent-child conversation about content that strengthens literacy skills as much as print books or basic e-books do (Chiong et al., 2012).

2) Overall, print books were found to be better for co-reading between a parent and a child than either e-book platform. Neither kind of e-book supports story-focused conversation and story comprehension as well as print books do (Chiong et al., 2012).

3) The majority of parents who co-read e-books on iPads prefer co-reading print books, unless they are traveling or commuting with their child. They feel that e-book co-reading is too difficult and they do not want their young children to have too much screen time (Vaala & Takeuchi, 2012).

To summarize, designers of enhanced e-books need to create e-books with co-reading-related activities and include fewer games and videos (Chiong et al., 2012). Parents seem to prefer print books, but they will use e-books for strengthening literacy and pre-literacy skills when they travel (Vaala & Takeuchi, 2012). We have a lot more to learn about this subject, so don’t recycle your print library yet.

References

Chiong, C., Ree, J., Takeuchi, L. & Erickson, I. (Spring 2012). Print books vs. e-books: Comparing parent-child co-reading on print, basic and enhanced e-book platforms. The Joan Ganz Cooney Center. Retrieved from http://magent.enr-corp.com/logclick.asp?rt=[$rel_trans]&u=http%3a%2f%2fwww.joanganzcooneycenter.org%2fwp-content%2fuploads%2f2012%2f07%2fjgcc_ebooks_quickreport.pdf

Vaala, S. & Takeuchi, L. (Summer 2012). Parent co-reading survey: Co-reading with children on iPads: Parents’ perceptions and practices. The Joan Ganz Cooney Center. Retrieved from http://magent.enr-corp.com/logclick.asp?rt=[$rel_trans]&u=http%3a%2f%2fwww.joanganzcooneycenter.org%2fwp-content%2fuploads%2f2012%2f11%2fjgcc_ereader_parentsurvey_quickreport.pdf

Kyle D. Pruett, M.D. is an advisor for The Goddard School®. Dr. Pruett is an authority on child development who has been practicing child and family psychiatry for over twenty-five years. He is a clinical professor of child psychiatry at Yale University’s Child Study Center.

Warm Winter Wishes Craft

This special homemade photo gift is sure to warm hearts this winter! Create one for a special someone or make many to give as gifts to family & friends.

What you need:
Sheets of colored paper or craft foam
Ribbon or small adhesive magnets
Small photo(s) of your family or child
Glue stick
Child-safe scissors
Washable markers
Pencil
Single hole punch
Decorative “winter” craft accessories of your choice

What to do:

  1. Use a pencil to trace your child’s hand on a sheet of paper or craft foam. Trace each finger individually or around their four fingers together and thumb separately to make a mitten shape.
  2. Carefully cut out the hand or mitten shape, and then trim your photo to fit in the “palm” of the cutout. Glue the photo in place.
  3. Here’s the fun part! Encourage your little one to get creative with washable markers and “winter” craft accessories to add their own decorative touch!
  4. When your child is happy with their masterpiece, either punch a hole in the top and tie a ribbon through it for hanging or attach small adhesive magnets to the back for hanging on the refrigerator.

*An adult should oversee all activities. Activities may not be appropriate for all ages.

What Our Children Teach Us

Our children come to us with a fresh look at life, full of uniqueness, purity and innocence. Each and every day, our children take joy in learning from us–not just the big life lessons, but the nuances, too. As grown-ups, we often rush through life, caught up in day to day tasks. In a blink, babies become preschoolers, and before we know it we’ll be cheering for them at their high school graduation.

Consider what our children can teach us, or remind us of, if we only let them. Our children can remind us what love is–true, unconditional love. They can remind us what it means to really apologize, to not just say “I’m sorry,” but to mean it. They can remind us what pure, raw emotion is–happiness, in its most genuine form, and sadness, too. They can remind us to look for joy in the smallest places. They can remind us to laugh and to laugh often–it lowers stress and it’s good for the soul.

What does your child teach you?

News Items

Winter Wonderland Open House
Saturday, December 7th
10am-12pm

Puffy Paint Polar Bears
December 13th
10:00-11:30am

Winter Party
December 20th
10am-11:30am

School Early Dismissal
Tuesday, December 24th
Closing at 5:00

SCHOOL CLOSED for Winter Break
December 25th – January 1st

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, Texas 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: DHoustonTX@goddardschools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – November 2013

   November 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: Thumb-Sucking & Pacifiers by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Thumb-sucking and pacifiers are guaranteed to evoke debate whenever the topic is raised with parents, especially new ones. We have no trouble remembering relevant stories in our own families about thumb-suckers and how old they were when they stopped. Fact: Many children choose to suck their thumbs from before they are born because it is an important form of self-soothing and comfort.

Here are a few considerations that shape this debate as you make your decision about skin versus plastic:

  • Contemplating germs? Thumbs and pacifiers are about equally un-hygienic, but both can be washed frequently.
  • Concerned about teeth deformity? Dentists have found that genetic tendencies forecast the need for braces more often than sucking a thumb or pacifier in infancy. The exception may be “24/7-suckers” through kindergarten and beyond.
  • Pacifier versus thumb? Your thumb is always with you – no late night 911’s to the nearest pharmacy. The pacifier, however, is easier to remove when the day comes (typically first in a parent’s mind), and seems less self-indulgent to many parents.
  • Partner consensus? Talk to your partner. Do not assume that your partner has an identical philosophy about thumb versus pacifier as yours. This is an important conversation to have and revisit. Discuss this topic with your child’s teacher. Most parent magazines also cover this issue regularly.

Try not to make this a big deal. Very few children go to college with their pacifiers. At the same time, denying your children their comfort at a time when they may need it most will backfire more often then not, increasing their attachment to it. Children who know when it’s time for their comfort are showing you they know a thing or two about their needs, not that they have a habit.

Kyle D. Pruett, M.D. is an advisor for The Goddard School®. Dr. Pruett is an authority on child development who has been practicing child and family psychiatry for over twenty-five years. He is a clinical professor of child psychiatry at Yale University’s Child Study Center.

Preschooler-Approved: Votes are in for the Top 10 Toys for 2013!

In October, our preschoolers, ages six weeks to six years, participated in every child’s dream job–The Goddard School Preschooler-Approved Toy Test. This sixth annual nationwide event was conducted by children at select Goddard Schools.

Toy companies from throughout the country submitted their products for consideration. Submissions were required to be age-appropriate toys that encouraged playful learning and are available for less than $40. A team of education experts from Goddard Systems, Inc. reviewed the toys and advanced 20 to the next round for the true testers–the children! Children and teachers worked together to identify their favorites and placed their votes.

Each of the 38 participating Goddard Schools have submitted their findings and the results are in. After tallying the votes, the Top 10 have been determined. Click here for The Goddard School Preschooler-Approved Top 10 Toys of the 2013 season.

Thanksgiving and Giving Thanks

We see our family and friends, eat too much pie, enjoy a few extra days off from school and work, but beyond that… How can we demonstrate to our children the importance of both Thanksgiving and giving thanks?

The first Thanksgiving. First, let’s start by making sure our children know the story of the first Thanksgiving. Pick up a developmentally-appropriate book or find information online. It is important to discuss this story of hardship, friendship and sharing in an age-appropriate way.

A new tradition. Establish a new family tradition revolving around what your family is thankful for. This Thanksgiving, have everyone write or draw what they are most thankful for. Together, decorate a shoebox or journal with everyone’s answers. Make a point of adding to this box or journal throughout the year, and by next Thanksgiving you will have an amazing record of thanks. Add to this year after year–what a great treat it will be for the family to read through each Thanksgiving as your children grow!

Share. What are some of the things your children are most thankful for?

News Items

Canned Food Drive
November 4th – November 27th

Ants on a Log
November 6th

Kindergarten trip to Kroger’s
November 13th
9:30-11:30
12555 Briar Forest Drive

Thankful Tree
November 18th

SCHOOL CLOSED
November 28th and 29th

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, Texas 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – September 2013

   September 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: Transitioning to Childcare by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Transitioning your child from home care to childcare is wrenching for every parent. In fact, most babies and young children adapt to their new environment more easily than parents do. And it’s important for parents to appreciate and care for their own emotions at this juncture.

As with so many things for young children, taking it slow and easy can work wonders. If your child is moving into alternative childcare for the first time, make the transition gradual, providing lots of support.

  • Make sure your child meets the caregivers or teachers before moving into this new environment. If you choose a childcare center or a preschool, make sure your child knows at least one other child in the class. If your child doesn’t already know someone, ask the caregiver to suggest one or two children who might be good matches for your child, and set up a few play dates.
  • Talk to your child about the new arrangement, describing the friends to be made and the wonderful things to be done and learned. Talk about being apart and getting back together. Play games such as hide-and-seek that demonstrate being apart and together.
  • When moving to a new childcare arrangement, start gradually, if possible. For example, allow your child to be alone at the childcare center for short periods at first, then slowly increase the time away from you.
  • Once the new arrangements are underway, get up a bit earlier so you have time together before you leave. Also, make special family times in the evenings and on weekends.
  • Let your child take her favorite toy or “softie” to school.
  • Tell the caregiver or teacher of any factors that might influence your child’s behavior or needs for the day, such as a restless night, family illness or visits from relatives.
  • Be aware that separation anxiety may come and go in cycles. You can ease your child’s upsets if you make your departure warm and smooth, staying long enough to let your child settle in, but without lingering. And never sneak out or lie, telling your little one you “will be right back” just before you dash to the parking lot. Your child needs to be able to rely on his trust in you as he navigates this new world.
  • When you pick your child up, ask the caregiver about what happened during the day. Then discuss the day’s events with your child.

Kyle D. Pruett, M.D. is an advisor for The Goddard School®. Dr. Pruett is an authority on child development who has been practicing child and family psychiatry for over twenty-five years. He is a clinical professor of child psychiatry at Yale University’s Child Study Center.

Helping Your Child Make Friends

To a preschooler, a “friend” is anyone who is willing to play the way they want to play during any given period of time. Friends are just as likely to be boys as girls and may change frequently. Playing with friends is an important way for children to learn social skills including sharing and taking turns so providing your child the opportunity to make friends is helpful, worthwhile and fun!

Dale Walker, a professor of child development at the University of Kansas, offers these guidelines to promote productive and enjoyable playdates.

  1. Limit the initial invitation to one or two friends at your home.
  2. Schedule the playdate for one to two hours to avoid overstimulating the children.
  3. Plan games and activities your child enjoys and provide enough materials so the children don’t have to share immediately.
  4. Guide the children as they make a craft, play a game or splash in a wading pool rather than letting them manage themselves.
  5. Schedule playdates with the same children on a weekly basis.
  6. Periodically play one-on-one with your child to develop familiarity with their playing style and stimulate their social interaction.
  7. If your child is struggling socially with their peers consider adopting a pet, which is usually nonthreatening.
  8. Reading books and watching shows about friendship also reinforces the positive aspects of socialization.
  9. Model friendship by inviting friends to meet, especially when your friends have children compatible with your own.
  10. Limit your expectations and pressure to prevent your child developing insecurity about developing friends.

APPLE PRINTING*

Materials:
Apples
Paint (Use washable poster paint for paper prints and fabric paints for clothes)
Paper plates
Something to print on
Newspaper to protect table
Art smocks
Knife to cut the apple

*Children should have adult supervision throughout this activity.

How To:

  1. Cover your working area with newspaper, and make sure everyone is wearing old clothes or a smock!
  2. Pour paint on to paper plates (one color per plate).
  3. Cut the apples in half. Create an apple silhouette by cutting the apple from top to bottom, or create a circle with a star by cutting the apple horizontally. Have your child guess what each shape will look like before you cut the apple, or brainstorm different ways to create different shapes with the apple.
  4. Have your child dip the flat side of the apple in the paint, thoroughly covering the apple, and then place it on the printing surface.
  5. Have fun creating fun designs and pictures with your homemade stamps!

News Items

School Closed
September 2nd, 2013
School is closed in observance of Labor Day

Grandparents Day Celebration
September 5th, 2013
10:30AM

Friendship Chain
September 17th, 2013
10:00AM – 11:30AM
Today our children will be given a strip of paper so they can create any design of their choice. Then each strip will be glued together to create a chain

Make a Card for a Friend
September 18th, 2013
10:00AM – 11:30AM
Today each child will be given a color of construction paper of their choice. Then they will make a card to give to a friend

Community Helpers
September 27th, 2013
All Day
Today the children can come to school dressed as their favorite community helper

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX  77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – August 2013

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   August 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: Grandparents by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Love and time…need we say more? How about wise historian, mentor, confidant, elder, counselor, spiritual guide, financier, playmate or parental antidote? These are all roles that grandparents play in the lives of their grandchildren. And grandparents are a growing force! The number and percentage of the population that grandparents account for has grown dramatically in the last 15 years – from 58 million to 78 million.

Here are a few ways that you can help foster a healthy relationship between your parents and your children:

  • When planning a visit, talk about how you can help and what you should bring to help things go smoothly. Discuss recent routines and help your parents childproof their house – more to keep your child safe than to protect the crystal. This communication provokes less defensiveness in grandparents, and helps them be a part of the solution from the start.
  • Relax some rules, but don’t compromise your core values. For instance, sweets seem to be a generational prerogative, but television monitoring should continue according to your child’s habits and your beliefs.
  • Children and grandparents are so close because they share something in common – you! They can share stories, secrets, etc. that allow children the experience of close relationships with a loving family member who is not wholly responsible for their future happiness, homework or well being.
  • Spoiling is not a helpful approach to grandparenting and most of them know it. Positive expectant attention is best. Interestingly, today’s grandparents are so busy, I think this is less of a problem these days.
  • Enjoy the relationship your children are developing with your parents.

When misunderstandings or problems occur (and they are bound to), it’s better to figure out a way to talk about them than to avoid each other. That is too steep a price for your children. We all want this relationship to work because the benefits are forever.

Kyle D. Pruett, M.D. is an advisor for The Goddard School®. Dr. Pruett is an authority on child development who has been practicing child and family psychiatry for over twenty-five years. He is a clinical professor of child psychiatry at Yale University’s Child Study Center.

Pack a Healthy Lunch…that your child will enjoy!

Introduce your children to healthy eating by involving them in the lunch preparation. Children have a tendency to eat and try new foods that they helped to prepare. And children who help in the kitchen build their confidence which makes them feel important and proud.

Avoid brown bag boredom and try the following healthy, easy and fun options. Bonus – your children will want to eat these choices!

Turn lunch into an adventure:
Cut sandwiches into playful shapes with cookie cutters. Children are more excited about eating a star- or dinosaur-shaped sandwich because it makes the experience fun! Choose cheese or deli meats to replace breads and cut them into fun shapes, too.

Make lunch fun by including a dip:
Yogurt is a great dip for fruit.
Provide hummus for veggies.

Use a variety of ‘sandwich’ options:
Bagels, pita bread, wheat wraps or crackers.

Consider packing applesauce or yogurt as a treat in lieu of a ‘sweet’ dessert.

Grandparents Day

National Grandparents Day is just around the corner (Sunday September 8th)! Here are a few charming gift suggestions:

  • Help your child write a letter to Grammy to tell her why she is so special. Decorate the envelope with stickers, stamps, glitter and more.
  • Get out the paints, markers, crayons and your spare scrapbooking supplies and encourage your child to make a masterpiece for Pop-Pop. Place in an inexpensive frame-violà!-it’s the perfect gift.
  • Show Nanna your child’s sweet side! Whip up a batch of sugar cookies and provide colored icing, sprinkles, etc. Your child will love decorating this custom cookie gift!

How will your child recognize a favorite grandparent this year?

News Items

Splash Day
Tuesday, August 7th, 2013
Morning Outside Time

Splash Day
Wednesday, August 20th, 2013
Morning Outside Time

End of Summer Party Hawaiian Luau
Thursday, August 22nd, 2013
11:00am – 12:30pm

School Closed
Friday, August 23rd, 2013
Teacher In-Service Day

Start of the 2013-2014 School Year
Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – July 2013

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   July 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: Routines and Rituals, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Ah, routines and rituals…such comforts against the one universal truth that life is nothing but change. Our children seem to get this sooner than we parents. When they struggle as infants to get the day and night thing down, they are teaching us how important and soothing the predictable is when tired, hungry, cranky and the like. As toddlers, we watch in amazement as they doggedly line up their shoes, trucks or dolls in the face of a little uncertainty and in search of the reassuring symmetry of order. These are not simple entertainments, but powerful and effective coping strategies that, if we are lucky, they never quite give up. Some of the uses of the psychological calendar of anticipation and predictability:

  • By 18 months: Children know the routines of everyday life and are very reassured by them: dressing, mealtimes, play, school, bath time, and finally bedtime with a story and a kiss. These are an antidote to the uncertainties of this period of rapid growth.
  • By 24 to 26 months: Children have a reliable sense of the week’s rhythms, and appreciate the difference between a weekday and a weekend.
  • By 42 months: Children begin to anticipate the predictable patterns of the year and its changing seasons, family gatherings, holidays, and birthdays.

All the while they are soaking up the beginnings of culture and ethnic diversity in such vital rituals.

Routines and rituals are especially important (and sometimes hardest) to maintain when a child is ill, or the family is going through a stressful time. Routines around food, clothing, bathing, going to school and sleep can be soothing precisely because they don’t vary in the face of change. The ultimate routine or ritual is mealtime. Children learn about what matters in life in a regular, predictable, culture-rich and (one hopes) nutritious environment. Plan it and protect it.

Ultimately, they (and we) give up most of these early comforts, going the way of the blankie and binkie. The next generation of routine and ritual comforts owe their efficacy to these early and more primitive coping strategies. So honor and promote them while you may. They disappear all too soon.

Kyle D. Pruett, M.D. is an advisor for The Goddard School®. Dr. Pruett is an authority on child development who has been practicing child and family psychiatry for over twenty-five years. He is a clinical professor of child psychiatry at Yale University’s Child Study Center.

Playing it Cool

When the summer sun blazes bright, children often spend more time outdoors–running, jumping, climbing, biking and being active. It is important to remember that physical activity in excessive heat can cause a variety of health issues including sunburn, heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps and heat rash. Below are a few tips that can help prevent your child from experiencing any of these heat-related illnesses. (Please note: If you feel that your child is experiencing symptoms of a heat-related illness, dial 911 and seek medical attention immediately.)

  • If you are aware that the day is going to be excessively hot, try to limit outdoor play time to the morning and evening hours (before 10 am and after 4 pm).
  • Sunglasses and hats with brims help protect against the sun’s harmful rays. Always apply a sunscreen with SPF 15 or above that protects against UVA and UVB rays before your child heads outdoors. Apply liberally and reapply every two hours and after swimming or sweating.
  • Lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing should be worn in a single layer to help absorb and facilitate sweat evaporation. If your child should sweat through their clothing, have them change into a dry outfit before continuing their activity.
  • Fluids, fluids, fluids! Children should be well hydrated before they go out to play and have access to drinking water while participating in outdoor activities.
  • During prolonged outdoor activity, like a sports game or practice, children should be given frequent breaks (in 20-minute increments) to recover (in the shade) and rehydrate.

Make Your Own Ice Pops

Ice pops are perfect for a summer dessert or afternoon snack. Instead of purchasing them at the store, invest in an ice pop mold (or use small paper or plastic cups) and invite your little one into the kitchen to experiment with making your own. After you try the delicious recipes below, get creative and see what tasty flavors you can whip up!

Strawberry Lemonade Ice Pops
1 (12-ounce) can frozen lemonade concentrate
3 cups cold water
1 (16-ounce) package frozen sliced strawberries

Prepare the lemonade as directed on the package. Place the frozen strawberries into a blender and puree them until smooth. If necessary, use some of the lemonade to help the strawberries blend. Stir the strawberry puree into the lemonade and pour the mixture into the ice pop molds. Freeze them until set.

Pudding Pops
1 package sugar-free pudding mix in the flavor of your choice
2 cups cold low-fat milk
2 cups low-fat Cool Whip

Prepare the pudding as directed on the package, using the 2 cups of cold low-fat milk. Mix in the 2 cups of low-fat Cool Whip and divide the mixture into ice pop molds. Freeze them until set.

*An adult should oversee all activities. Activities may not be appropriate for all ages.

News Items

Wear Red, White, and Blue Parade
Wednesday, July 3rd
10:00AM – 10:30AM

Independence Day
Thursday, July 4th
All Day – School Closed

Splash Day
Tuesday, July 9th and July 23rd
Morning Outside Time

Kona Ice (Snow Cones)
Wednesday, July 24th
11:00AM

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – May 2013

   May 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: Talk About Your Feelings, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Talk about your own feelings and how they got that way in a simple and straightforward manner. Children who have never heard their parents talking about how or what they are feeling on a day-to-day basis face an uphill climb to develop useful understandings about language and emotion. Say things like: “I was sad when my friend forgot to come over” or “I felt happy to get that nice letter from Grandma.” Simple, clear and to the point, the feeling in your voice will capture your toddler’s interest, so don’t be too surprised to see her staring at you at first. It gives her the words to match the emotion she reads in you and will eventually identify herself.

A Trip to the Zoo

There is so much to see and learn at the zoo! Children get to see how wild and exotic animals live, what they eat, how they sleep, how they play and interact with one another and, sometimes, how they interact with other species.

Before heading to the zoo for the first time, you may want to talk with your preschooler about what the zoo is and about the animals they will encounter there. Share a book about animals with your little one and think about the animals that you would like to see on your visit. You can also compile a list of questions that your child has about different animals and then look for the answers when you visit each animal’s exhibit at the zoo.

Beyond the Tie: Celebrating Father’s Day

Tired of the traditional breakfast in bed? Over the cliché shirt and tie combo? Make Dad’s Day this year a little more rad.

  • Have a picnic, take a walk or just relax outdoors–let Dad choose how he would most enjoy relaxing with the family.
  • Plan a day of not planning. Make today the day to put aside all errands, chores and projects–help Dad to enjoy a pressure-free day.
  • Father’s Day is not only for your children to celebrate Dad–let him know just how impressed you are with how amazing a father he is to your children.
  • Give Dad the gift of a few hours by himself! We all need time to ourselves to refocus now and then. Dad may be thrilled to schedule an unexpected tee time, or to curl up with that new bestseller he’s been eyeing up.
  • Don’t limit the father festivities to just your children’s dad; encourage your little ones to call their grandpas and other special male role models, too.
  • Most importantly, let Dad know how appreciated he is. Help your children to write (or color) a thank you note, encourage them to create a special song or lend them a hand in whipping up a special treat. Homemade gifts or projects can sometimes be the best at conveying your child’s love and appreciation for Dad.

News Items

Cinco de Mayo Celebrations
Friday, May 3rd, 2013
10:00AM
The children will create Cinco de Mayo decorations and learn about this special day.

Muffins for Mom
Friday, May 10th, 2013
6:30AM – 9:00AM
Please join your child for muffins and juice in honor of Mother’s Day. The PPK class will have a Mothers Day Tea in their class from 11:00-12:00.

Three Little Pigs Activity
Tuesday, May 14th, 2013
10:00AM
The children will make a pig mask after reading Three Little Pigs.

End of the School Year Party
Friday, May 24th, 2013
11:00AM
The children will have their end of school year party.

School Closed – Memorial Day
Monday, May 27th, 2013
The school will be closed in honor of Memorial Day.

Contact Us
1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX  77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email:
Robert & Jiena Chow HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com
Terrie Costantini DHoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – April 2013

   April 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: A Toddler’s Property Laws, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Whoever coined the phrase “possession is nine-tenths of the law” must have been the parent of a toddler. After “no,” the word that toddlers use most frequently is “mine.” This is a natural, and often amusing, component of the child’s new sense of self. The following humorous list has been around, in various forms, for years. It certainly reflects a universal experience.

A Toddler’s Property Laws

  1. If I like it, it’s mine.
  2. If it might be mine, it’s mine.
  3. If it’s in my hand, it’s mine.
  4. If I can take it from you, it’s mine.
  5. If I had it before, it’s mine.
  6. If I’m making something, all the parts are mine.
  7. If it’s mine, it must never appear to be yours in any way.
  8. If it looks like mine, it’s mine.
  9. If I think it’s mine, it’s mine.

Root for Earth with The Goddard School!

To plant the seeds of environmental awareness in their communities, Goddard Schools across the nation are hosting Root for Earth, a week-long celebration of conservation that features a variety of activities for promoting a healthier Earth for future generations.

The celebration kicks off on Earth Day, Monday, April 22, with a flip of the switch as nearly 400 Goddard Schools nationwide turn off all non-essential lighting for one hour. Additionally, the children will participate in environmentally friendly activities throughout the week. Stop by from Monday, April 22 to Friday, April 26 to Root for Earth with us!

Mother’s Day Handprint Bouquet!

Materials
A piece of scrap paper
Colored cardstock
Pencil
Crayons and/or markers
Scissors
Green pipe cleaners
Single-hole punch
Ribbon

Directions

  1. Trace your child’s hand on a piece of scrap paper and cut the tracing out with scissors.
  2. Use this cutout as a template for tracing your child’s handprint onto five or six pieces of colored cardstock. (Children who are old enough to use a pencil may enjoy this task!)
  3. Cut out all of the new tracings with scissors. Punch a hole in the bottom of each one, just above the bottom edge of the palm, with the single-hole punch.
  4. After all the handprints are cut out and the holes are punched, encourage your little one to use the crayons and/or markers to draw colorful designs on the handprints.
  5. Fold one pipe cleaner in half for each handprint “flower.”
  6. Thread about 1/4 inch of the folded end of the pipe cleaner into the hole you punched in the handprint. Fold it down to the secure the pipe cleaner to the cardstock.
  7. Twist the two sides of the pipe cleaner together to create a stem.
  8. Repeat for all of the handprints.
  9. Once all of the handprint flowers are complete, tie them into a bunch with a ribbon. Present them to Mom, Grandma or Auntie to thank her for all that she does!

*An adult should oversee all activities. Activities may not be appropriate for all ages.

News Items

Safari Hunt
Friday, April 5th, 2013
The children will have a pretend safari hunt during their outside times.

Book Fair
April 8th – 12th, 2013
We will have a Scholastic book fair all week!

Plant a Goddard Tree
Monday, April 22nd, 2013
10:00AM
The children will plant a tree in honor of Earth Day.

Garden Party
Friday, April 26th, 2013
9:30AM – 11:30AM
The children will plant and start their own vegetable and flower garden.

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com             281-596-0300

email:
Robert & Jiena Chow
HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

Terrie Costantini DHoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – March 2013

   March 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: Moral Behavior and Empathy, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

As with other aspects of behavior, moral behavior must be taught. One element of such behavior is the ability to empathize with others, to put oneself in someone else’s shoes. Obviously, empathy can help inhibit anti-social behavior.

There is some evidence that empathy is part of a child’s in-born temperament, and that some children are naturally more empathic than others. However, research also shows that empathic parents tend to have empathic children. So this important attribute is clearly shaped by example and teaching as well as by genes.

The ability to show children what it is to care about another’s well-being–physical and emotional–is central to teaching morality. It is also central to their self-control and their long-term ability to form lasting relationships.

Many childhood games are valuable for teaching connectedness, turn-taking and awareness of others. Peekaboo is a great example.

Annual Scholarship

Did you know that your Goddard School graduate is eligible for the Anthony A. Martino Memorial Scholarship? This $10,000 scholarship is awarded annually to a junior or senior high school student who graduated from The Goddard School.

The application deadline for this year’s scholarship is Wednesday, March 27, 2013.

Visit The Goddard School website for scholarship eligibility criteria and application form.

Shake it Up!

Nutrition comes in many shapes and sizes–and not all of them are solid. A fruit shake is a refreshing way to start your child’s day. Choose your child’s favorite fruits or try a new one from time to time. Add a piece of whole grain toast–and maybe a little nut or seed butter–and you have a balanced breakfast alternative. Cut and freeze fruits ahead of time to make this breakfast as quick and easy as it is nutritious and fun!

Yogurt, Banana, and Strawberry Shake

Ingredients
1 Small Banana
6 Strawberries
2/3 Cup Plain Yogurt (Substitute: Soy or Vanilla Yogurt)
3 Tbsp. Orange Juice
2-3 Tbsp. 2% Milk

Directions

  1. Slice the banana and strawberries.
  2. Puree sliced fruit in a blender or food processor.
  3. Add the yogurt and orange juice.
  4. Blend until smooth. (Use milk to thin, if necessary.)

News Items

Farm Food Animals
March 7th, 2013
Children will need to bring in pictures of food that farm animals eat.

Teddy Bear Picnic
March 15th, 2013
Children may bring their favorite teddy bear to have a picnic with it at lunch.

Puppet Show
March 20th, 2013
10:00AM
We will have a puppet show come to the school and perform various stories.

Egg Hunt & Spring Parties
March 28th, 2013
10:00AM
Children will need to bring in 6 filled plastic eggs. Filled with stickers. Please see class door for Spring Party sign up sheet.

Spring Holiday
March 29th, 2013
School Closed.

Contact Us
1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX  77077
www.goddardschool.com 
281-596-0300
email:
Robert & Jiena Chow
HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

Terrie Costantini
DHoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

forward to a friend

In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – March 2013

   March 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: Moral Behavior and Empathy, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

As with other aspects of behavior, moral behavior must be taught. One element of such behavior is the ability to empathize with others, to put oneself in someone else’s shoes. Obviously, empathy can help inhibit anti-social behavior.

There is some evidence that empathy is part of a child’s in-born temperament, and that some children are naturally more empathic than others. However, research also shows that empathic parents tend to have empathic children. So this important attribute is clearly shaped by example and teaching as well as by genes.

The ability to show children what it is to care about another’s well-being–physical and emotional–is central to teaching morality. It is also central to their self-control and their long-term ability to form lasting relationships.

Many childhood games are valuable for teaching connectedness, turn-taking and awareness of others. Peekaboo is a great example.

Annual Scholarship

Did you know that your Goddard School graduate is eligible for the Anthony A. Martino Memorial Scholarship? This $10,000 scholarship is awarded annually to a junior or senior high school student who graduated from The Goddard School.

The application deadline for this year’s scholarship is Wednesday, March 27, 2013.

Visit The Goddard School website for scholarship eligibility criteria and application form.

Shake it Up!

Nutrition comes in many shapes and sizes–and not all of them are solid. A fruit shake is a refreshing way to start your child’s day. Choose your child’s favorite fruits or try a new one from time to time. Add a piece of whole grain toast–and maybe a little nut or seed butter–and you have a balanced breakfast alternative. Cut and freeze fruits ahead of time to make this breakfast as quick and easy as it is nutritious and fun!

Yogurt, Banana, and Strawberry Shake

Ingredients
1 Small Banana
6 Strawberries
2/3 Cup Plain Yogurt (Substitute: Soy or Vanilla Yogurt)
3 Tbsp. Orange Juice
2-3 Tbsp. 2% Milk

Directions

  1. Slice the banana and strawberries.
  2. Puree sliced fruit in a blender or food processor.
  3. Add the yogurt and orange juice.
  4. Blend until smooth. (Use milk to thin, if necessary.)

News Items

Farm Food Animals
March 7th, 2013
Children will need to bring in pictures of food that farm animals eat.

Teddy Bear Picnic
March 15th, 2013
Children may bring their favorite teddy bear to have a picnic with it at lunch.

Puppet Show
March 20th, 2013
10:00AM
We will have a puppet show come to the school and perform various stories.

Egg Hunt & Spring Parties
March 28th, 2013
10:00AM
Children will need to bring in 6 filled plastic eggs. Filled with stickers. Please see class door for Spring Party sign up sheet.

Spring Holiday
March 29th, 2013
School Closed.

Contact Us
1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com             281-596-0300
email:
Robert & Jiena Chow
HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com
Terrie Costantini DHoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

forward to a friend

In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – March 2013

   March 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: Moral Behavior and Empathy, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

As with other aspects of behavior, moral behavior must be taught. One element of such behavior is the ability to empathize with others, to put oneself in someone else’s shoes. Obviously, empathy can help inhibit anti-social behavior.

There is some evidence that empathy is part of a child’s in-born temperament, and that some children are naturally more empathic than others. However, research also shows that empathic parents tend to have empathic children. So this important attribute is clearly shaped by example and teaching as well as by genes.

The ability to show children what it is to care about another’s well-being–physical and emotional–is central to teaching morality. It is also central to their self-control and their long-term ability to form lasting relationships.

Many childhood games are valuable for teaching connectedness, turn-taking and awareness of others. Peekaboo is a great example.

Annual Scholarship

Did you know that your Goddard School graduate is eligible for the Anthony A. Martino Memorial Scholarship? This $10,000 scholarship is awarded annually to a junior or senior high school student who graduated from The Goddard School.

The application deadline for this year’s scholarship is Wednesday, March 27, 2013.

Visit The Goddard School website for scholarship eligibility criteria and application form.

Shake it Up!

Nutrition comes in many shapes and sizes–and not all of them are solid. A fruit shake is a refreshing way to start your child’s day. Choose your child’s favorite fruits or try a new one from time to time. Add a piece of whole grain toast–and maybe a little nut or seed butter–and you have a balanced breakfast alternative. Cut and freeze fruits ahead of time to make this breakfast as quick and easy as it is nutritious and fun!

Yogurt, Banana, and Strawberry Shake

Ingredients
1 Small Banana
6 Strawberries
2/3 Cup Plain Yogurt (Substitute: Soy or Vanilla Yogurt)
3 Tbsp. Orange Juice
2-3 Tbsp. 2% Milk

Directions

  1. Slice the banana and strawberries.
  2. Puree sliced fruit in a blender or food processor.
  3. Add the yogurt and orange juice.
  4. Blend until smooth. (Use milk to thin, if necessary.)

News Items

Farm Food Animals
March 7th, 2013
Children will need to bring in pictures of food that farm animals eat.

Teddy Bear Picnic
March 15th, 2013
Children may bring their favorite teddy bear to have a picnic with it at lunch.

Puppet Show
March 20th, 2013
10:00AM
We will have a puppet show come to the school and perform various stories.

Egg Hunt & Spring Parties
March 28th, 2013
10:00AM
Children will need to bring in 6 filled plastic eggs. Filled with stickers. Please see class door for Spring Party sign up sheet.

Spring Holiday
March 29th, 2013
School Closed.

Contact Us
1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

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In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – February 2013

   February 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: “Will I Spoil My Child?” , by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Most adults believe a spoiled child is one who behaves in a way that the adult finds objectionable. But what’s “objectionable?” The answer varies widely among cultures and individuals.

What’s important to one person can be irrelevant to the next, what’s cute to one can be bothersome to another. In our multicultural society, the key is for you, others in your home, and those who care for your child to agree on the basics.

Once those basics are set, reason and consistency are you best tactics. Giving in from time to time won’t ruin your rules or spoil your child. If something is really important to the little guy, let him win on occasion (except where safety and minimal behavior requirements are concerned). It shows him that his view have merit and teaches him that perseverance on things that really count for him can be rewarded. Especially give in on those instances where you initial position was extreme or unnecessary–something all adults do from time to time, even with other adults.

If caving becomes a habit, however, you do no one a favor, least of all your child. The boundaries she needs to feel secure get muddied, and she will spend untold effort to reestablish them–a big waste of resources for her and a big test of your patience.

Within the limits you set there is never a need for limits on your love. Care and affection don’t spoil a child. In fact, they provide the best teaching model a child could ask for. You are demonstrating the very behavior you want to encourage. There is no downside to this.

Choosing a Summer Program

February is the ideal time to enroll your child in a summer program. Keeping a child’s day consistent throughout the summer months keeps the child’s brain focused and helps prevent learning losses during the summer. Additionally, this could ease the anxiety that often accompanies transitioning into a new classroom or school in the fall.

Tips for Choosing a Summer Program

  • Choose a program that is based on each child’s interests and natural curiosity. This allows children the opportunity to direct their own learning;
  • Ask about the credentials, experience and training of the teachers or counselors;
  • Check the health and safety practices of the program. Make sure that the program will be able to handle your child’s unique needs;
  • Inquire about the daily schedule of the program. Does the program combine songs, stories, exploration, art, physical activities and learning adventures in a safe, nurturing environment? Ask how much freedom a child has to choose his or her own activities;
  • Ask for references.

Waffle Snacks

Whole-grain waffles are all the rage these days. Not only are they delicious, but whole-grain waffles also offer a great boost of iron and vitamins B6, B12 and A.

Pop a few small frozen whole-grain waffles in the toaster, then add your little one’s choice of toppings for a quick, satisfying snack. Some of our favorite combinations include reduced-fat cream cheese with fruit jelly, peanut butter (or sunflower butter) with sliced apples and sliced strawberries with bananas drizzled in honey. Experiment with different combinations to find your favorites!

Contact Us
1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com
281-596-0300
email: HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

forward to a friend

In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – February 2013

   February 2013  

Parenting with Pruett: “Will I Spoil My Child?” , by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Most adults believe a spoiled child is one who behaves in a way that the adult finds objectionable. But what’s “objectionable?” The answer varies widely among cultures and individuals.

What’s important to one person can be irrelevant to the next, what’s cute to one can be bothersome to another. In our multicultural society, the key is for you, others in your home, and those who care for your child to agree on the basics.

Once those basics are set, reason and consistency are you best tactics. Giving in from time to time won’t ruin your rules or spoil your child. If something is really important to the little guy, let him win on occasion (except where safety and minimal behavior requirements are concerned). It shows him that his view have merit and teaches him that perseverance on things that really count for him can be rewarded. Especially give in on those instances where you initial position was extreme or unnecessary–something all adults do from time to time, even with other adults.

If caving becomes a habit, however, you do no one a favor, least of all your child. The boundaries she needs to feel secure get muddied, and she will spend untold effort to reestablish them–a big waste of resources for her and a big test of your patience.

Within the limits you set there is never a need for limits on your love. Care and affection don’t spoil a child. In fact, they provide the best teaching model a child could ask for. You are demonstrating the very behavior you want to encourage. There is no downside to this.

Choosing a Summer Program

February is the ideal time to enroll your child in a summer program. Keeping a child’s day consistent throughout the summer months keeps the child’s brain focused and helps prevent learning losses during the summer. Additionally, this could ease the anxiety that often accompanies transitioning into a new classroom or school in the fall.

Tips for Choosing a Summer Program

  • Choose a program that is based on each child’s interests and natural curiosity. This allows children the opportunity to direct their own learning;
  • Ask about the credentials, experience and training of the teachers or counselors;
  • Check the health and safety practices of the program. Make sure that the program will be able to handle your child’s unique needs;
  • Inquire about the daily schedule of the program. Does the program combine songs, stories, exploration, art, physical activities and learning adventures in a safe, nurturing environment? Ask how much freedom a child has to choose his or her own activities;
  • Ask for references.

Waffle Snacks

Whole-grain waffles are all the rage these days. Not only are they delicious, but whole-grain waffles also offer a great boost of iron and vitamins B6, B12 and A.

Pop a few small frozen whole-grain waffles in the toaster, then add your little one’s choice of toppings for a quick, satisfying snack. Some of our favorite combinations include reduced-fat cream cheese with fruit jelly, peanut butter (or sunflower butter) with sliced apples and sliced strawberries with bananas drizzled in honey. Experiment with different combinations to find your favorites!

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2012

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

forward to a friend

In The News: THE GODDARD SCHOOL LOCATED IN HOUSTON (WEST) CELEBRATES ITS GRAND OPENING

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: 
Robert Chow
Onsite Owner
The Goddard School
281-596-0300
HoustonTX@goddardschools.com

THE GODDARD SCHOOL LOCATED IN HOUSTON (WEST) CELEBRATES ITS GRAND OPENING

Innovative Learning Program Open in Energy Corridor District

Houston, TX (Grassroots Newswire) November 26, 2012 — The Goddard School®, the premier preschool and childcare center for children from six weeks to six-years-old, located at 1720 Crescent Plaza Drive in the Energy Corridor District of Houston will celebrate its Grand Opening on Saturday, December 1 from 11 AM to 1 PM. Children of all ages are invited to take a picture with the “Winterland Princess” and enjoy fun activities including entertainment by a magician, a balloon artist, crafts in the classrooms and much more. Popcorn, cotton candy and other refreshments will be served.

Goddard School owners, Robert and Jiena Chow, along with the school’s educational director, Terrie Costantini, and faculty, which includes teachers trained and experienced in early childhood development, are eager to welcome children into this nurturing environment where the curriculum encourages active learning. The Goddard School F.L.EX.™ Learning Program is based on a unique learning continuum that encompasses developmental guidelines, formative assessments and child-focused lesson plans that are delivered in a creative and fun environment with a child-centered approach to meet each child’s individual needs. The program offers parents the convenience of extended hours from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., the flexibility of both morning or full-day schedules, and Quality Assurance standards that are monitored corporately.

Goddard School owners are committed to providing the best early childhood development experience for the children in their communities. In January of 2009, Goddard Systems, Inc. received company-wide accreditation from AdvancED by meeting their key accreditation standards including a research-based curriculum, teaching methods that enhance student learning and a commitment to continuous improvement. Goddard Schools support the on-going training of Goddard teachers by providing professional development courses on a quarterly basis through Goddard Systems University which has been approved as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).

Tours for interested families may be arranged by calling Robert, Jiena or Terrie at 281-596-0300. You can reach the School on the web at www.goddardschool.com. Parents are always welcome to just drop in for a tour!

The Goddard School®: Celebrating 25 Years of Learning through Play.
Learning for fun. Learning for life. The Goddard School uses the most current, academically endorsed methods to ensure that children from six weeks to six years old have fun while learning the skills they need for long-term success in school and in life. Talented teachers collaborate with parents to nurture children into respectful, confident and joyful learners. The Goddard School’s AdvancED and Middle States-accredited F.L.EX.™ Learning Program reaches more than 45,000 students in 390+ Goddard Schools in 35 states. The Goddard School’s comprehensive play-based curriculum, developed with early childhood education experts, provides the best childhood preparation for social and academic success. To learn more about The Goddard School, please visit www.goddardschool.com.

In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – July 2012

July 2012  

Parenting with Pruett: Hobbies and Pastimes, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Share your interests with your child. It’s important for parents to keep up with their own passions. You need “a life,” and you won’t have one if you lose yourself totally in your child’s world. Keep up with the piano, chess, painting, hiking, whatever. Teach your child about your avocations. Let her be a part of what you love. This is one of the most intriguing, emotionally rich forms of learning children get. You are building a common bond that will last for years.

Summer Car Safety Tips

According to kidsandcars.org, “On average, 38 children die in hot cars each year from heat-related deaths.” This fast-paced world is full of distractions and even the greatest parents have been known to forget that their little one is sleeping the back seat. Use the tips below from kidsandcars.org to ensure this never happens to your family.

  • asdfasdfasdfasdfasdf

Picnics are a great family outing and can become a treasured family memory. Grab the picnic basket and a blanket to introduce your children to the wonders of a family picnic.

What to pack (always consider age-appropriateness)

  • Frisbee, a ball for catch or a kite: Play first, eat later;
  • Bottled water or sippy cups with water;
  • Easy-to-pick-up veggies: Baby carrots, celery, cucumbers, peppers;
  • Fresh fruit: Slice it or cube it and put it in small individual containers;
  • Plastic utensils;
  • Pre-cut sandwiches: Use your favorite fillings on whole grain bread;
  • Pre-sliced cheese and whole-grain crackers;
  • Sunscreen;
  • Trail mix: Make your own with nuts, raisins, pretzels and dried fruit;
  • Wipes or hand sanitizer.

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com
(281) 596-0300
email: HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The information in this newsletter is provided by Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) and is intended to provide general, helpful information to parents of children enrolled in Goddard Schools. Each Goddard School is independently owned and operated by a franchisee under a license agreement with GSI. From time to time, GSI will pass along information taken from outside sources regarding medical or other professional information. This information is taken solely from the sources identified and neither GSI nor its independent franchisees make any representation regarding its accuracy or completeness. This information should never be used without consultation with a professional advisor. For complete information, you should consult the sources identified in the newsletter and your own professional advisors.

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

forward to a friend

In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – July 2012

July 2012  

Parenting with Pruett: Hobbies and Pastimes, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Share your interests with your child. It’s important for parents to keep up with their own passions. You need “a life,” and you won’t have one if you lose yourself totally in your child’s world. Keep up with the piano, chess, painting, hiking, whatever. Teach your child about your avocations. Let her be a part of what you love. This is one of the most intriguing, emotionally rich forms of learning children get. You are building a common bond that will last for years.

Summer Car Safety Tips

According to kidsandcars.org, “On average, 38 children die in hot cars each year from heat-related deaths.” This fast-paced world is full of distractions and even the greatest parents have been known to forget that their little one is sleeping the back seat. Use the tips below from kidsandcars.org to ensure this never happens to your family.

  • Put something you will need, like your cell phone, handbag, employee ID, briefcase, etc., on the floor in the back of the car.
  • Get in the habit of always opening the back door of your vehicle every time you reach your destination to make sure your child is not in the car. This will soon become a habit. We call this the “Look Before You Lock” campaign.
  • Keep a large stuffed animal in the child’s car seat when it is not occupied. When the child is in the seat, put the stuffed animal in the front passenger seat. Anytime the stuffed animal is up front you know your child is in the child safety seat in the back.
  • Tell your child’s daycare center or babysitter that you will always call if your child will not be coming on a normally scheduled day.
  • When a child is missing, check your vehicles and car trunks immediately.
  • If you see a child alone in a vehicle, get involved. If they are hot or seem sick, get them out as quickly as possible. Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.

Family Picnic Time

Picnics are a great family outing and can become a treasured family memory. Grab the picnic basket and a blanket to introduce your children to the wonders of a family picnic.

What to pack (always consider age-appropriateness)

  • Frisbee, a ball for catch or a kite: Play first, eat later;
  • Bottled water or sippy cups with water;
  • Easy-to-pick-up veggies: Baby carrots, celery, cucumbers, peppers;
  • Fresh fruit: Slice it or cube it and put it in small individual containers;
  • Plastic utensils;
  • Pre-cut sandwiches: Use your favorite fillings on whole grain bread;
  • Pre-sliced cheese and whole-grain crackers;
  • Sunscreen;
  • Trail mix: Make your own with nuts, raisins, pretzels and dried fruit;
  • Wipes or hand sanitizer.

 

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com
(281) 596-0300
email: HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The information in this newsletter is provided by Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) and is intended to provide general, helpful information to parents of children enrolled in Goddard Schools. Each Goddard School is independently owned and operated by a franchisee under a license agreement with GSI. From time to time, GSI will pass along information taken from outside sources regarding medical or other professional information. This information is taken solely from the sources identified and neither GSI nor its independent franchisees make any representation regarding its accuracy or completeness. This information should never be used without consultation with a professional advisor. For complete information, you should consult the sources identified in the newsletter and your own professional advisors.

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

forward to a friend

In The News: Goddard Parent Newsletter – July 2012

July 2012  

Parenting with Pruett: Hobbies and Pastimes, by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., advisor to The Goddard School®

Share your interests with your child. It’s important for parents to keep up with their own passions. You need “a life,” and you won’t have one if you lose yourself totally in your child’s world. Keep up with the piano, chess, painting, hiking, whatever. Teach your child about your avocations. Let her be a part of what you love. This is one of the most intriguing, emotionally rich forms of learning children get. You are building a common bond that will last for years.

Summer Car Safety Tips

asdfasdfasdfasdfasdfthe stuffed animal is up front you know your child is in the child safety seat in the back.

  • Tell your child’s daycare center or babysitter that you will always call if your child will not be coming on a normally scheduled day.
  • When a child is missing, check your vehicles and car trunks immediately.
  • If you see a child alone in a vehicle, get involved. If they are hot or seem sick, get them out as quickly as possible. Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.

Family Picnic Time

Picnics are a great family outing and can become a treasured family memory. Grab the picnic basket and a blanket to introduce your children to the wonders of a family picnic.

What to pack (always consider age-appropriateness)

  • Frisbee, a ball for catch or a kite: Play first, eat later;
  • Bottled water or sippy cups with water;
  • Easy-to-pick-up veggies: Baby carrots, celery, cucumbers, peppers;
  • Fresh fruit: Slice it or cube it and put it in small individual containers;
  • Plastic utensils;
  • Pre-cut sandwiches: Use your favorite fillings on whole grain bread;
  • Pre-sliced cheese and whole-grain crackers;
  • Sunscreen;
  • Trail mix: Make your own with nuts, raisins, pretzels and dried fruit;
  • Wipes or hand sanitizer.

 

Contact Us

1720 Crescent Plaza Drive
Houston, TX 77077
www.goddardschool.com
(281) 596-0300
email: HoustonTX@GoddardSchools.com

The information in this newsletter is provided by Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) and is intended to provide general, helpful information to parents of children enrolled in Goddard Schools. Each Goddard School is independently owned and operated by a franchisee under a license agreement with GSI. From time to time, GSI will pass along information taken from outside sources regarding medical or other professional information. This information is taken solely from the sources identified and neither GSI nor its independent franchisees make any representation regarding its accuracy or completeness. This information should never be used without consultation with a professional advisor. For complete information, you should consult the sources identified in the newsletter and your own professional advisors.

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, click here.

forward to a friend

In The News: THE GODDARD SCHOOL LOCATED IN HOUSTON (WEST) DEMONSTRATES ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: 
Robert & Jiena Chow
Onsite Owners
The Goddard School
281-596-0300
HoustonTX@goddardschools.com

THE GODDARD SCHOOL LOCATED IN HOUSTON (WEST) DEMONSTRATES ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT

Innovative Learning Program To Open in Energy Corridor District

Houston, TX (Grassroots Newswire) 6/12/12 — Despite the nation’s financial crisis, demands for childcare and early childhood education continue to grow in many areas. The Goddard School® located at 1720 Crescent Plaza Drive in the Energy Corridor District of Houston will answer these needs and provide the community with new job opportunities when it opens in the fall.

The Goddard School, a nationwide franchise of Goddard Systems, Inc., is maintaining an aggressive growth strategy, even in the current economy. Joe Schumacher, CEO, points to several factors to explain the company’s success.

Schumacher notes that Goddard Schools attract successful, motivated individuals who are ready to try something new in their career. “Robert and Jiena Chow, owners of The Goddard School located in Houston, are typical of our franchisees. They are high achievers who realized success in previous careers, but are ready for a change. With two young children, operating a Goddard School especially appeals to the Chows because they understand the concept of doing well by doing good for the community.”

“Parents obviously have to work, and in a down economy, even more go back to work,” adds Schumacher. “This trend actually increases the number of families who need quality childcare. We know that parents will sacrifice other things–such as dining out or a family vacation–to keep their children in an environment where they are safe, happy, learning and thriving.”

The new state-of-the-art 8,000+ square foot building in Houston has been designed to accommodate approximately 150 children from six weeks to six years old plus after school and summer programs for school age children. The new school will offer flexible schedules for children Monday through Friday, from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. The Goddard School offers a year-round program where children are encouraged to develop at their own pace in a warm environment supported by a team of dedicated teachers. The Goddard School FLEX™ Learning Program is based on a unique learning continuum that encompasses developmental guidelines, formative assessments and child-focused lesson plans that are delivered in a creative and fun environment with a child-centered approach to meet each child’s individual needs.

“After speaking with several Goddard School franchisees and local educators, we realize that The Goddard School would be great for our community. Its innovative program and teaching philosophy is unparalleled to those in the area. We are eager to welcome children into this nurturing environment with dedicated professional teachers,” say Robert and Jiena. “Along with our core curriculum, we include several enrichment programs such as foreign language and yoga which are specifically designed to encourage children’s lifelong love of learning.”

Interested families can call Robert or Jiena at 281-596-0300 or reach the School on the Web at www.goddardschool.com.

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com
Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) was recently named the #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States by Entrepreneur magazine for the eleventh consecutive year (January 2012) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales) by Franchise Times for the fifth consecutive year (October 2011). Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI is expanding The Goddard School network throughout the United States. GSI currently licenses 380+ franchised schools with more than 45,000 students in 35 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier educational childcare provider.

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    Documents and/or Photos available for this release:

THE GODDARD SCHOOL LOCATED IN HOUSTON (WEST) DEMONSTRATES ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT
THE GODDARD SCHOOL LOCATED IN HOUSTON (WEST) DEMONSTRATES ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT

To view supporting documents and/or photos, go to www.enr-corp.com/pressroom and enter Release ID: 331505

In The News: Innovative Learning Program Coming to Houston (West)

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: 
Beth Morino
Coordinator
Goddard Systems, Inc.
610-265-8510
bmorino@goddardsystems.com

Innovative Learning Program Coming to Houston (West)

The Goddard School located in Houston (West) is Under Construction 

Houston, Texas (Grassroots Newswire) 3/28/12 — The Goddard School® located at 1720 Crescent Plaza Drive in the Energy Corridor District of Houston is currently under construction. The new state-of-art 8,000+ square foot building has been designed to accommodate approximately 150 children from six weeks to six years old, plus after school and summer programs for school age children. The new School is projected to open during the fall of 2012 and will offer flexible schedules for children Monday through Friday, from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.

The on-site owner will attend training and will then be available to offer tours of the new School – approximately one month before the Grand Opening. Over the next several months, an Education Director and a faculty of qualified teachers will be hired.

The Goddard School offers a year-round program where children are encouraged to develop at their own pace in a warm environment supported by a team of dedicated teachers. The Goddard School FLEX™ Learning Program is based on a unique learning continuum that encompasses developmental guidelines, formative assessments and child-focused lesson plans that are delivered in a creative and fun environment with a child-centered approach to meet each child’s individual needs. Overseen by a team of Goddard Quality Assurance Representatives and licensed by the state, The Goddard School provides a safe and secure learning environment for children.

Goddard School owners are committed to providing the best early childhood development experience for the children in their communities. In January of 2009, Goddard Systems, Inc. received company-wide accreditation from AdvancED by meeting their key accreditation standards including a research-based curriculum, teaching methods that enhance student learning and a commitment to continuous improvement. Goddard Schools support the on-going training of Goddard teachers by providing professional development courses on a quarterly basis through Goddard Systems University which has been approved as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).

To learn more about The Goddard School, parents are encouraged to visit on the Web at www.goddardschool.com or call (281) 596-0300. 

About Goddard Systems, Inc. www.goddardschool.com
Recently named #1 Childcare Franchise in the United States, by Entrepreneur magazine, for the eleventh consecutive year (January 2012) and one of the Top 200 Franchise Systems (in worldwide sales), by Franchise Times, for the fifth consecutive year (October 2011); Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) is expanding The Goddard School® network throughout the United States. Headquartered in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, GSI currently licenses 380+ franchised schools with more than 45,000 students in 35 states. With a successful system in place and dedicated franchisees, GSI is the acknowledged leader in franchised childcare and a premier educational childcare provider in the United States.

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