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Archive for October, 2017

UN-SCARY HALLOWEEN COSTUME IDEAS

Halloween for preschoolers should be light and upbeat, not scary. If you plan to celebrate with your little ones, either with trick-or-treating or a party, here are some fun and simple costumes to consider.

  • Superhero – All you need is a long-sleeved t-shirt, a colored hand towel or a rectangle of fabric for a cape; leggings or fitted pants; and felt for making an eye mask, headband and symbol cutout of your children’s choice. They can pick a superhero from a favorite movie or television show, or they can make up their own.
  • Hula Dancers – You will need a grass skirt bought from your local party store or made from the heads of rope mops. You will also need a lei from the party store, or you can make one from fake flowers purchased at the craft store.  Add leggings, fitted pants or tights, too. A toy ukulele can also make a fun prop.
  • Monster Truck – If you have a child who loves trucks, you can make a truck costume with cardboard boxes, some careful cuts (by a parent, of course) and some paint or markers. You will need to add some shoulder straps to the ‘truck’ to make sure your child is properly buckled (and can easily carry it).
  • It’s Raining Cats and Dogs – Most of us have an umbrella, children’s raincoat and rain boots handy at home.  Many of us have some stuffed dogs and cats at home, too. Have your child pick out which stuffed dogs and cats to use, and then you can attach them to the top of a sturdy, inexpensive umbrella with string or safety pins.

The options for fun costumes are endless! Try one of the above options or be creative and come up with your own!

HALLOWEEN TREATS: SPIDER SNACKS!

Looking for a spooktacular twist for your child’s Halloween snack? Try these tasty spider snacks!Spider Snacks 2

Ingredients:

  • Crackers
  • Cream Cheese
  • Pretzel Sticks
  • Candy-coated chocolates
  1. Spread cream cheese on a cracker.
  2. Break  pretzel sticks in half and use as legs on each side of the cracker (two per side).
  3. Use small candy-coated chocolates for eyes and place on the cream cheese.
  4. Enjoy!

“WILL I SPOIL MY CHILD?”

Most adults believe a spoiled child is one who behaves in a way that the adult finds objectionable.  But what’s “objectionable?”  The answer varies widely among cultures and individuals.

What’s important to one person can be irrelevant to the next, what’s cute to one can be bothersome to another.  In our multicultural society, the key is for you, others in your home, and those who care for your child to agree on the basics.

Once those basics are set, reason and consistency are your best tactics.  Giving in from time to time won’t ruin your rules or spoil your child.  If something is really important to the little guy, let him win on occasion (except where safety and minimal behavior requirements are concerned).  It shows him that his views have merit and teaches him that perseverance on things that really count for him can be rewarded.  Especially give in on those instances where your initial position was extreme or unnecessary – something all adults do from time to time, even with other adults.

If caving becomes a habit, however, you do no one a favor, least of all your child.  The boundaries she needs to feel secure get muddied, and she will spend untold effort to reestablish them – a big waste of resources for her and a big test of your patience.

Within the limits you set there is never a need for limits on your love.  Care and affection don’t spoil a child.  In fact, they provide the best teaching model a child could ask for.  You are demonstrating the very behavior you want to encourage.  There is no downside to this.