{     Offering the Best Childhood Preparation for Social and Academic Success.     }

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE GODDARD SCHOOL PRESCHOOL & CHILDCARE IN WESTON

More than just a daycare, we’re a premier preschool and childcare for Infants, Toddlers, Preschool, & Pre-Kindergarten children. Learning through play while providing a welcoming, fun learning environment and the highest quality preschool curriculum is our utmost priority. Our experienced, loving, topnotch teachers are specially trained professionals committed to maintaining premium standards of early childhood programming and education.

Our full time and part time program includes a fun summer camp in partnership with Destination Imagination to teach 21st century skills through STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, & Math) based challenges!

You have questions, and we have answers.

We have outlined the most commonly asked questions below. If you cannot find the information you need, please contact us at 781-296-8790 OR westonma@goddardschools.com and visit us at: The Goddard School in Weston.   You can also schedule a TOUR today!

MY CHILD’S DAY

HOW WILL I KNOW WHAT HAPPENS DURING MY CHILD’S DAY?

We have an open-door policy.  You are always welcome to visit or call during the day. When you pick up your child, you receive an electronic daily activity report that highlights what your child did the curriculum of the day and pictures and videos of your child’s day attached. The teacher will record how long your child napped, what your child ate and how much they ate.  For those children potty training, the teachers will outline how well your child is doing with potty training. The teacher always writes a note about a special moment of your child’s day.

DO THE CHILDREN GO OUTSIDE EVERY DAY?

Goddard School playgrounds are extensions of the classrooms. Teachers provide outdoor free playtime, outdoor learning opportunities, and outdoor picnics. If the weather permits, children play outside every day for at least 30 minutes each day, twice a day!

MAY I VISIT MY CHILD DURING THE DAY?

Absolutely! We have an open-door policy.  Feel free to visit your child at any time during the day.

 

ACADEMICS

WILL MY CHILD BE CHALLENGED ACADEMICALLY AT THE GODDARD SCHOOL? I WANT TO KNOW THAT MY CHILD IS PREPARED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL.

Yes. At The Goddard School in Weston, we believe the best academic preparation includes encouraging your child’s enthusiasm for learning. Our teachers create individualized lesson plans based on Goddard developmental guidelines, monthly themes and the needs of each child. By providing individual attention in a small group setting, Our teachers nurture each child’s curiosity and confidence. Learning to ask questions, discovering cause and effect, negotiating fair play and making new friends are all academic building blocks at Goddard.

WHAT KIND OF CURRICULUM DO YOU USE IN THE CLASSROOM?

We call our approach the F.L.EX.® Learning Program (Fun Learning Experience). Based on academic research that states children experience the deepest, most genuine learning when they are having fun, the program is designed to provide a well-rounded experience and help ensure children become confident, joyful and fully prepared students. The program includes the following:

 

  • Fun, hands-on activities that allow children to learn through experience;
  • Teachers who develop customized lesson plans based on the children’s interests and adapt them to the children’s developmental needs;
  • Warm, nurturing classrooms that promote a passion for literacy, science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics;
  • A daily schedule that ensures children have time for independent exploration and discovery every day;
  • Age-appropriate interactive technologies, such as interactive whiteboards, that support collaborative and meaningful learning without replacing creative play, exploration or physical activity.

OUR APPROACH

WHY DOES The GODDARD School in Weston HAVE BOTH AN OWNER AND AN EDUCATION DIRECTOR ON SITE?

We, the owners, focus on managing the School. We are available to the children, their families and the faculty every day. We also have a director who is responsible for the curriculum and program. This system allows the director the ability to observe the classrooms, mentor the faculty and develop a healthy learning environment for your child while we operate the School. 

HOW FLEXIBLE ARE GODDARD SCHOOL PROGRAMS?

You can choose the schedule that works best for you and your child. The Goddard School in Weston offers half-day and full-day programs from two to five days a week. The Goddard School in Weston offers after-school programs.

 

SAFETY

HOW WILL I KNOW THAT MY CHILD IS SAFE WHILE I AM AT WORK?

We are committed to the safety and security of the children and teachers. We have chosen  security systems that work best for our location.  Visitors must present identification and register in visitor logs. The children’s parents or guardians must authorize any alternate caregivers for drop-off and/or pick-up, and these caregivers must present identification and password information.

 

Highly trained standards representatives visit each School twice a year to monitor health and safety policies and procedures at our school. Schools receive these unannounced, comprehensive reviews in addition to state licensing visits.

WHAT SECURITY MEASURES DOES THE SCHOOL TAKE BEFORE RELEASING CHILDREN?

All Schools must have password procedures and a sign-in and sign-out log. The children’s parents or caregivers must authorize any alternate caregivers, and these caregivers must present password information and two forms of identification, including a photo ID. All visitors must present identification and register in a visitor log.

 

ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY

OWNERS

We are a brother and sister team and we are the proud owners of The Goddard School in Weston.
Firas holds a Masters in Business Management from Northeastern University. Firas is a proud father of a Goddard student. Sally holds a Bachelor of Arts in Economics from Wheaton College, MA. Sally is a Weston resident and is a proud mother of 3 Goddard graduates. We are both involved in our communities and enjoy traveling, reading, sports, the outdoors, and spending time with our families. As residents of the area for over 15 years, we are proud to offer the opportunity for children to grow through exploration and hands-on learning in our own community. We recognize the importance of a safe and nurturing learning environment, which is why we chose The Goddard School. Growing up, education played an integral part of our lives. Our parents sent us to great schools that provided us with a solid, well-rounded education and helped foster a love for learning. We are excited and proud to be a part of The Goddard School and to be able to bring to the community the same, high caliber of education within the highest quality preschool experience.

DIRECTOR & ASSISTANT DIRECTOR

Jen is the School Director. Ms. Jen holds an Associate’s Degree in Business Administration and a Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services with a concentration in Early Childhood Education from Fisher College. She has been working in the field of early childhood education since 2001 and has been a Director since 2007. Ms. Jen has 4 children of her own and enjoys spending time with her family in Maine. She enjoys being outside, hiking, snowmobiling, boating and loves photography. She also has a love for dogs and has 2 German shepherds. Ms. Jen is very excited to be a part of The Goddard School and look forward to meeting you!

Ms. Emily is the Assistant Director. She holds a teaching certificate from North Shore Community College and is currently working towards her Bachelor’s Degree. Ms. Emily is certified through the DEEC to work with Infants, Toddlers, Preschool, & Pre-K children. She has been working with children since 2012 and has worked with all ages. Ms. Emily enjoys watching the children learn new things and seeing how proud of themselves they get when they reach a goal! While not at work, she loves being outdoors, going on hikes with her dogs, and baking.

FACULTY

Our teachers play an active role in your child’s education and development, setting the stage for a fun, engaging learning environment. These enthusiastic, creative educators design unique, personalized lesson plans to captivate your child. The faculty looks for learning opportunities that correspond with the children’s natural interests. If the teachers have planned a lesson on the solar system but the children are fascinated by the rain falling outside, they change the subject of the lesson to focus on the weather. The teachers can also customize the lessons to meet the individual needs of each child. Goddard Schools provide a teacher-to-child ratio that allows all the children to receive the individualized attention they need to grow and learn at a comfortable pace.  Our teachers receive continuing education support through Goddard University where they can access continuing education resources and webinars and have various opportunities to attend continuing education seminars.  Our teachers are all CPR and First Aid certified.  SORI, CORI, and DCF Background checks are mandatory prior to employment.

 

 

ADDITIONAL FAQS

WHAT ARE YOUR HOURS OF OPERATION?

Hours of operation are from 7 AM- 6 PM on Monday to Friday.

 

WHAT TOWNS DO YOU SERVE?

We proudly serve many towns in the Metro-Weston Boston are of Massachusetts.  Amongst those are Weston, Waltham, Wayland, Lincoln, Sudbury, Maynard, Natick, Waltham, Lexington, Watertown, Newton, Wellesley, and more!

 

Helping Your Child Make Friends

To a preschooler, a “friend” is anyone who is willing to play the way they want to play during any given period of time. Friends are just as likely to be boys as girls and may change frequently. Playing with friends is an important way for children to learn social skills including sharing and taking turns so providing your child the opportunity to make friends is helpful, worthwhile and fun!

Dale Walker, a professor of child development at the University of Kansas, offers these guidelines to promote productive and enjoyable playdates.

  1. Limit the initial invitation to one or two friends at your home.
  2. Schedule the playdate for one to two hours to avoid overstimulating the children.
  3. Plan games and activities your child enjoys and provide enough materials so the children don’t have to share immediately.
  4. Guide the children as they make a craft, play a game or splash in a wading pool rather than letting them manage themselves.
  5. Schedule playdates with the same children on a weekly basis.
  6. Periodically play one-on-one with your child to develop familiarity with their playing style and stimulate their social interaction.
  7. If your child is struggling socially with their peers consider adopting a pet, which is usually nonthreatening.
  8. Reading books and watching shows about friendship also reinforces the positive aspects of socialization.
  9. Model friendship by inviting friends to meet, especially when your friends have children compatible with your own.
  10. Limit your expectations and pressure to prevent your child developing insecurity about developing friends.

 

Five Ways to Discourage Children from Lying, by Dr. Kyle Pruett

Dr. Kyle Pruett, clinical professor of child psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine and member of The Goddard School Educational Advisory Board, offers five ways to discourage children from lying.

  1. Keep your cool when your child lies. Try to say ‘Oh,’ or ‘Okay,’ to give yourself some time to think about what to say next. Something like ‘I wonder what happened to the flowers’ works better than ‘Whoever did this had better tell the truth (‘or else!’ is implied).’ This strategy makes it easier for children to be truthful and improves your chances of hearing the truth later as they will feel less intimidated.
  2. Calmly, try to help your child understand why he lied and what he can do next time to avoid lying.
  3. Explain to your child that it’s okay to make a mistake and that she doesn’t have to lie about it. Also remember to praise your child for admitting that she made a mistake. Lying lessens when it’s safe to tell the truth.
  4. When you are on the fence about whether or not to believe your preschooler, err on the side of believing that your child is telling the truth. Or his version of it. After all, imagination is a powerful and creative force that might cause a child to tell a lie that he thinks is true. For example, a child might claim that there is a monster in the closet when that obviously isn’t true.
  5. Be aware that you are under constant scrutiny and that the ‘innocent’ white lie that you can’t make a donation to a charitable organization because you don’t have any cash, for instance, will be noticed by your child. Set a good example and remember that the truth starts at home.

Going on a Treasure Hunt

An ancient treasure map has turned up miraculously on your door step and it leads to a treasure chest hiding in your home! Great for parties or just a fun afternoon activity, send your children roaming around your house or backyard for some fun-filled treasure hunting adventures.

Like a scavenger hunt, create clues that will send the treasure hunters from one hint to the next, eventually ending at the “buried” treasure! Have fun and be creative when writing your clues—use riddles or rhymes—but don’t make them too hard for young children to figure out quickly.

Once you’ve created your clues, set up your landmarks for the treasure hunt. You could use stuffed animals and pretend they’re “wild dingos,” build a totem pole out of empty boxes or fill a small kiddie pool with sand (outside, of course) and encourage the children to dig for their next hint. The possibilities are endless! Be sure to set boundaries, and keep all landmarks and treasure chest within your home or backyard where you can easily supervise.

Cardboard treasure chests can be found in most party stores, but if you’re feeling adventurous, you could make one using a few supplies from your local craft store.

COOL SUMMER GAMES

Try these water activities with your children and keep them ‘cool’ in the hot July weather!

Water Works

This game is played like Musical Chairs. Play music while children run, skip and jump through a water sprinkler. After a short amount of time, stop the music. The child in the sprinkler when the music stops is in charge of controlling the music in the next round!

Frozen Toes

Fill a wading pool with cool water and ice cubes. Give each child a bucket. Ask the children to transfer as many ice cubes as they can from the pool to their bucket – using their feet! The child with the most ice cubes is the winner!

*Safety First: A parent or guardian should always be present when children are engaged in water play. Parents should use their discretion regarding age-appropriate games for their children.

What Am I Learning Today?

At The Goddard School, parents receive Daily Activity Reports to provide ongoing communication about the experiences their child has at school each day. The Daily Activity Reports allow for informed, open conversations among our teachers and parents and, more importantly, between parents and their child.

Studies have shown that when a parent discusses their child’s day with him or her, their child feels the importance of their place in the world, develops self-worth and builds self-esteem. It’s also been discovered that reviewing and discussing a child’s day allows information to move from short-term memory to long-term memory, a great way to extend their learning experience at home!

 

Temper Tantrums: The Parental Armageddon by Dr. Kyle Pruett

It’s a universally recognizable scenario which qualifies as the Armageddon of parenthood. A red face; ear piercing, soul scratching, vocal cord hemorrhaging screams and body thrashing – all characteristics of the temper tantrum. As a father of four, and grandfather, I’ve seen hundreds of temper tantrums. Each and every one has left me feeling more or less spent, not to mention saddened as a parent. Where do they come from and what can be done about them? During the holiday season, when they tend to peak, it seems timely to review what might be helpful.

The most common age for this behavior is between 3 ½ and 4 ½ years – the twelve to eighteen months before they start kindergarten. Tantrums seem to cluster around those moments when your children – and often you – are hungry, tired, scurrying about, running late and/or stressed out. It’s important to remember that they don’t usually ‘come out of nowhere’ – they tend to be a last straw for your child. Developmentally, they occur when children are struggling to manage their bodies (often having just finished toilet training) and their emotions (aggression, frustration).

My colleagues at Yale’s Parenting Center have been looking at temper tantrum management for years and are on the right track from my view point. They have highlighted the single most critical component of the parent/child temper tantrum interaction – the parental tendency to equal the child’s emotional intensity. This is not helpful. Your child is almost completely unaware of the storm he/she’s making, so when you leap in emotionally and physically charged ‘to get your child’s attention and stop this,’ your child ‘reacts’ to your intensity and escalation is the name of the game.

Their advice (with which I concur):

  • Forget punishment and yelling. It could terrify or confuse your child, often has no relevance to their distress given their immature sense of cause and effect, and only briefly satisfies your need to be in control.
  • Stay calm. Count to ten, turn away briefly, bite your lip, and above all – breathe – this way you won’t fuel the fire and it allows you and your child to recover more quickly.
  • Ignore the negative behavior. This de-escalates the tantrum faster than any other single thing a parent can do.
  • Turn your attention to praising the next ‘good thing’ your child does. Be very specific about what you appreciate and why, be sincere in your tone and behavior, and look them in the eye.

After a few weeks of these tactics, you’ll notice the tantruming is less frequent and less severe. One day you’ll look back and say, ‘Wow, it’s been months since the last meltdown.’

Hydration!

Sufficient Hydration is Necessary for a Healthy Lifestyle

Most of us are concerned that our children have good eating habits to ensure proper growth; however, not many of us put as much thought into the amount of water our little ones consume. What is the proper amount of water for children?

Water is not a one size fits all commodity. The amount of water children need depends on their age, weight and gender. Although there is not an exact number, we all could use a little more H2O to keep us on the go.

Here are some tips to increase your child’s water consumption.

  • The most efficient and effective way to boost your child’s water intake is to always have it available. Whether he is at home, at school or playing outdoors, make sure your child is always within reach of water.
  • Encourage your child to drink water by simply placing it in front of him without any alternative options. If he does not have soda or other sugary beverages around him, he will be more likely to drink the water without a fuss.
  • Increase your child’s consumption of fruits and vegetables that contain large volumes of water, such as strawberries, oranges, watermelon and cucumbers.
  • Be a good example; increase your water intake as well. This will not only keep you on track with how much water you consume, but watching you drink water will ensure that your child will want to drink it too.

Staying hydrated helps children focus better in school, brightens their mood and improves their performance in day to day activities.

Grab a glass of water for you and your little one, and start increasing your intake today.

Helping Your Child Make Friends

To a preschooler, a “friend” is anyone who is willing to play the way they want to play during any given period of time. Friends are just as likely to be boys as girls and may change frequently. Playing with friends is an important way for children to learn social skills including sharing and taking turns so providing your child the opportunity to make friends is helpful, worthwhile and fun!

Dale Walker, a professor of child development at the University of Kansas, offers these guidelines to promote productive and enjoyable playdates.

  1. Limit the initial invitation to one or two friends at your home.
  2. Schedule the playdate for one to two hours to avoid overstimulating the children.
  3. Plan games and activities your child enjoys and provide enough materials so the children don’t have to share immediately.
  4. Guide the children as they make a craft, play a game or splash in a wading pool rather than letting them manage themselves.
  5. Schedule playdates with the same children on a weekly basis.
  6. Periodically play one-on-one with your child to develop familiarity with their playing style and stimulate their social interaction.
  7. If your child is struggling socially with their peers consider adopting a pet, which is usually nonthreatening.
  8. Reading books and watching shows about friendship also reinforces the positive aspects of socialization.
  9. Model friendship by inviting friends to meet, especially when your friends have children compatible with your own.
  10. Limit your expectations and pressure to prevent your child developing insecurity about developing friends.

Five Ways to Prevent “Summer Slide”

 

Summer is an awesome time of year. It’s full of family get-togethers, trips to the pool and vacations. With all that awesomeness, though, sometimes learning falls by the wayside. Research has shown that some children experience summer learning loss, also known as “summer slide” because their minds aren’t as engaged as they are during the school year. You can help to keep your child’s brain active and prevent summer slide with these five fun learning activities:

  1. Read, read, read. Read to your child or encourage him to read for twenty minutes every day. Taking a trip to the library on hot, humid or rainy days can be fun, too. Also, listening to audio books is great during car trips.
  2. Learn a new word every week. Make this a game by seeing who can use the new word the most times throughout the week. You can even make a scoreboard and stick it on the fridge. Encourage your child to look through a picture dictionary to pick out new words.
  3. Get cooking. Cooking with your child is a fun way to teach your child math and reading skills as well as how to follow instructions. Look through a cookbook with your little one, and ask him what he would like to make.
  4. Hit the road. Take a field trip to a museum, a zoo or an aquarium. Before you go, read a book with your child about the sights at your destination. When you return, you and your child can write a journal entry about your adventures.
  5. Go outside. Embrace the nice weather and go on a hike, nature walk or bike ride. Pack a magnifying glass and/or binoculars, and take breaks along the way to take a closer look at things. You and your little one can even take notes on interesting objects or animals and look up more information about them online or in an encyclopedia when you get home.