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Archive for October, 2012

The Goddard School’s Internet Radio Show — Balancing Act: The Art of Parenting!

Need help navigating the world of parenting a preschooler? The Goddard School’s panel of early childhood development experts discusses and answers your questions on our Toginet Radio show — Balancing Act: The Art of Parenting. From education guidance to bullying-proofing advice to nutrition and fitness tips, our experts are here to help you.

Want to know how to choose the right childcare for your family? Need tips to help your child cope with divorce? Looking for help to balance your home and work life? Join host Ashley Betzendahl as she welcomes an incredible group of educators, researchers and experts in child development, early learning, technology integration, brain development, parent engagement and health and nutrition to share their tips and advice with you.

Dr. Kyle Pruett, internationally known child psychiatrist; Sue Adair, The Goddard School’s director of education; Susan Magsamen, award-winning author; Dr. Craig Bach, educational researcher; Dr. Jack Maypole, pediatric health and nutrition expert and popular pediatric blogger; Lillian Kellogg, educational technology proponent; and Lee Scott, Chair of The Goddard School’s Education Advisory Board and early education programming expert, are a few of the special guests who will be joining us each week.

Have a question for our experts? Listen and call in (877-864-4869) on Thursdays at 2 PM Central / 3 PM Eastern.

Taming the Tantrums

One of the truly gnarly limit-pushers is the temper tantrum.  These are the hallmark of the self-control wars in the early years.  They are distinct from the gut-wringing cries of the sick, wet, desperately hungry, or physically hurt infant or pre-toddler.  But they can look similar, and you can feel even more helpless.

Family - Teacher with Parent & ChildTantrums start to occur in that period of development when the “me do” surge for autonomy becomes increasingly frustrated by the parent who knows the toddler’s abilities are still so limited that trouble lurks behind most corners.  So when the child’s limited ability frustrates a particular goal, or a parent intervenes to rein her in, the internal frustrations can erupt into a screaming, kicking, crying rage.

Every time you help you child recover from such a debacle without humiliation or irrational punishment, she learns that her impulses cannot destroy her world and that you can help her learn how to manage this tiger, the way you did the other tigers of her early years – being left alone, being helplessly hungry, etc.

Finally, two pieces of advice about limit setting and self-control that are hard for many parents to remember.  When setting limits:

  • The fewer words the better.
  • Actions speak louder than words.