{     Offering the Best Childhood Preparation for Social and Academic Success.     }

10 Tips for Traveling with Your Preschooler

Traveling can be stressful, period. Add some young children to the mix, and it can be downright challenging. As you hit the road this summer, keep these handy travel tips in mind:

  1. Take breaks. If you’re driving, try to make regular rest stops so your child can blow off some steam, get some exercise, use the bathroom and/or have a snack.
  2. Stock up. Bring a stash of toys, snacks, coloring books, crayons and other goodies to keep your little one from getting bored or hungry during the trip.
  3. Tire ‘em out. Children often travel better when they’re tuckered out and sleepy. If you’re flying, have your child push a small suitcase around the waiting area or ride the escalators with you. If you’re driving, try to leave the house before dawn so you can just scoop up your drowsy child, put her in the car seat and hit the road.
  4. Surprise them with treats. While good behavior doesn’t automatically warrant a reward, a piece of candy or a wrapped toy can certainly encourage your child to “keep it up” if he is being particularly pleasant.
  5. Engage them. When children are actively involved in something, they are less likely to act out. Talk to your child about the trip and ask her what she’s looking forward to. You can also give her a disposable camera and ask her to document the trip. This will encourage her to observe her surroundings and focus on her interests.
  6. Take a bus. Or the subway or a train or a boat. Children love the novelty of public transportation, so if it’s available at your destination, use it. Large cities, such as New York City, Boston and Washington, D.C., usually have public transportation systems that are fairly inexpensive and easy to use.
  7. Keep tabs on your children electronically. You can use an electronic child locator (search online for stores) to make sure you can find your child if you’re separated. Most locators cost around $30 and include a transmitter your child wears and a locator unit you carry. If you get separated, you can press a button on the locator and the transmitter will make a sound that you can follow to find your child.
  8. Check the weather. Make sure you pack for any weather conditions you might encounter. You don’t want your child to be too hot or too cold. Extra clothing could add some extra bulk to your luggage but, if the weather changes, you’ll be glad you’re prepared.
  9. Pass the time. Travel delays are almost inevitable, but games are a fun way to make the time fly while you’re waiting. Whether it’s 20 Questions, a travel version of a popular board game or a quick game of Go Fish, your child (and you!) will appreciate the distraction.
  10. Sanitize. Traveling means coming into contact with more germs than usual, especially if you’re flying to your destination. Be sure to pack plenty of antibacterial wipes and hand sanitizer to disinfect your little ones’ hands, especially if they’ve come in to contact with the seat-back pockets of airplanes, which can be full of harmful bacteria.