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Archive for January, 2016

Hazelnut Granola Apple Wedges

Does your little one have a craving for a sweet snack? Stay healthy while satisfying your child’s appetite with some hazelnut granola apple wedges!

Ingredients:

  • 1 large apple
  • Hazelnut spread
  • Low-fat granola

Cut the apple into wedges. Holding each wedge by the skin side, spread it with hazelnut spread. Sprinkle granola on hazelnut spread-covered area. Substitute peanut butter (or any nut butter) for hazelnut spread if you’d like. Also feel free to add raisins!

*An adult should oversee all recipes and activities. Recipes and activities may not be appropriate for all ages. 

The Goddard School® Accepting Applications For The 8th Annual Anthony A. Martino Memorial Scholarship

The Nation’s Leading Preschool System Invites Its Alumni To Apply For A $10,000 College Scholarship

KING OF PRUSSIA, PA (January 19, 2016)Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI), the national franchisor of TheAAMS - Haley Check Presentation Goddard School® preschool system focused on learning through play, is now accepting applications for the 8th annual Anthony A. Martino Memorial Scholarship. Awarded annually to one high school senior who graduated from The Goddard School Pre-Kindergarten or Kindergarten program, the prestigious scholarship honors an alumnus whose work ethic and perseverance parallels that of Anthony A. Martino, the founder of The Goddard School franchise system.

Three finalists will be selected based on academic record, participation in school, community service, work experience, expressed goals and aspirations along with a video submission. Awarding more than $70,000 through the Anthony A. Martino Memorial Scholarship, The Goddard School continues to provide windows of opportunity to college-bound alumni.

“At The Goddard School, our mission is to teach and prepare children during their most formative years. We use fun, hands-on activities to instill a healthy love of learning while encouraging their natural curiosity. In an age of academic pressure and overscheduling, learning through play is more important than ever,” said Joseph Schumacher, CEO of Goddard Systems, Inc. “The Anthony A. Martino Memorial Scholarship signifies our continuing commitment to students who have graduated from our program, and we are pleased to provide our most promising alumni with financial assistance to help fulfill their collegiate aspirations.”

Applications must be submitted by March 11, 2016 to be considered for the scholarship. The finalists for the scholarship will be selected and notified on or before April 4, 2016 and will be posted on Goddard System, Inc.’s social media accounts by April 25, 2016. The recipient will be selected and announced on or beforeMay 10, 2016. Only one recipient will be selected for the Anthony A. Martino Memorial Scholarship.

For more information on scholarship rules and criteria, please visit www.goddardschool.com/approach-to-education/scholarship. For more information on The Goddard School, please visit www.goddardschool.com.   

About The Goddard School® 

Learning for fun. Learning for life.® For nearly 30 years, The Goddard School has used the most current, academically endorsed methods to ensure that children from six weeks to six years old have fun while learning the skills they need for long-term success in school and in life. Talented teachers collaborate with parents to nurture children into respectful, confident and joyful learners. The Goddard School’s AdvancED- and Middle States-accredited F.L.EX.® Learning Program (Fun Learning Experience) reaches more than 50,000 students in more than 440 Goddard Schools in 35 states. The Goddard School’s comprehensive play-based curriculum, developed with early childhood education experts, provides the best childhood preparation for social and academic success. To learn more about The Goddard School, please visit www.goddardschool.com.

 

Five Ways to Encourage STEAM Learning

STEAM learning (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) has become a vital part of early childhood education. Team WorkSTEAM concepts help prepare children for life in the 21st century. After all, STEAM-related jobs make up one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. economy (Baird-Remba, Guey, & Lubin, 2013). This is expected to increase over time as children eventually join the workforce. Here are five ways you can encourage STEAM learning at home.

  1. Take a field trip. Museums, zoos, aquariums, libraries and even public parks provide many opportunities to introduce STEAM subjects. Be sure to engage your child, ask her what she would like to see and ask whether she would like to learn more about what she has seen.
  2. Watch STEAM-related TV shows and movies. While screen time should not be solely relied upon for education, there are many ways it can help enhance your child’s learning experience. Things like documentaries and educational programming may strengthen your child’s understanding of STEAM subjects.
  3. Conduct experiments. Many fun and easy science experiments can be done at home with simple household items. You can find some ideas here. You can also help your child keep a journal of the experiments she completes and record what she learns from each one.
  4. Encourage questions. Children are naturally inquisitive, often asking “why?” or “how?” Following this thread of curiosity may lead to a STEAM subject which interests your child. If you don’t know the answer to your child’s question, research the topic with him.
  5. Ask your child what she would like to be when she grows up. Many careers are tied to STEAM learning. Help your child find out more about the field she wants to pursue and what she needs to learn to get there.

References

Baird-Remba, R., Guey, L., & Lubin, G. (5 June 2013). 14 US Industries That Will Boom In The Next Decade. Business Insider. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com/americas-fastest-growing-industries-2013-6

Technology and Early Learning: Part Three Bridging the Digital Divide
Practical Resources for Educators

Susan Magsamen is the Senior Vice President of Early Learning at global learning company Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH). She is a member of the Educational Advisory Board for The Goddard School and senior advisor to The Science of Learning Institute and Brain Science Institute at Johns Hopkins University.
This piece was originally published on 02/05/2015 on the HMH blog.

Just over 30 years ago, Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates shared a vision for a society with “a computer on every desk and in every Girl at computerhome.” We’ve made great progress since then – over 80% of the American population now has a home computer and more people than ever now use the internet. From smartphones to Skype, digital resources shape much of our daily lives.

Today’s edtech landscape is exciting, with adaptive technology, learning management tools and interactive content designed for students on-the-go. However, we still have work to do when it comes to digital equity and closing the digital divide — the Pew Research Center reports that digital access varies drastically by state and geography.

Furthermore, educators report a number of barriers to smooth tech integration in the classroom, from budget challenges to low-bandwidth internet connections to lack of professional development, and many have also observed that their classroom’s use of technology remains basic – word processing, video projection or simple research.

We’ve explored the concept of “too much” tech and the importance of a digital diet in the last post, but what’s at stake when learners do not have access to digital learning resources?

Here’s some food for thought about the digital divide and education:

  • 72% of public K-12 schools and the majority of public libraries do not have sufficient broadband to support 21st century learning.
  • 30% of households do not have high-speed internet, making it difficult for students to benefit from digital learning tools at home.
  • Teachers and students in underserved areas disproportionately carry the burden of these access issues.
  • 85% of teachers surveyed by the Pew Research Center seek out their own opportunities for professional development around effective use of tech; 75% say digital tools have added new demands to their lives.
  • 84% of teachers worry that access to new technology is leading to greater disparities between affluent and disadvantaged schools and districts.

Comprehensive digital literacy and advanced technology training has become more essential than ever to career development and college-readiness. We can’t afford to have some students using microblogs, creating podcasts and communicating with instructors via social networks, while others struggle with outdated hardware and limited internet connections. Without holistic action to bridge this access gap, many young people (and educators) will be left behind. 

Digital equity is a complex systemic issue that stretches beyond the education space, but it is not insurmountable and individual actions will make a difference. So, what can educators looking to increase access and sharpen skills within their own classrooms and communities do to move forward? There’s plenty:

Look To Your Greater Community

  • Explore creating technology alliances with civic organizations such as the YMCARotary, and Boys and Girls Clubs
  • Local community colleges, colleges and universities have some of the best technology resource centers around. They also often have services for the greater community, like volunteer mentoring programs and free or inexpensive workshops.
  • Children’s museums offer age-appropriate technology centers for teachers, parents and kids. See if there is an Intel Computer Clubhouse in your community and encourage students to join.
  • Create relationships with local businesses. Many are interested in community investment and can offer professional development for teachers and/or resources for students.

Utilize Complimentary Tech Support 

  • Stores that sell computers often hold workshops for people that have recently purchased equipment. Sales people can be very knowledgeable and eager to help you better understand the technology landscape.
  • All tech companies provide tutorials, videos and product information for their products. Increasingly, customer service support is available by online chat in addition to toll-free phone calls and is reliable and real-time.
  • Internet and telecommunications providers routinely have school and at-home programs available for communities and families that do not regular have internet access. 

Visit Your Local Library Network

  • Make a standing appointment with a local resource librarian. Libraries often offer free courses or seminars. You could even provide questions prior to your appointment to maximize learning time.
  • Most public libraries now offer computer and internet access. Don’t be afraid to ask the librarians for information about access – what are the rules or guidelines for young users? Are there times when the computer stations are used for classes, or are very busy? Are there branches of your local library network that are especially well-equipped?
  • Check out a book! There are many great print resources on technology for beginners looking to enhance their digital skills and expertise.

Technology is best learned through practice. If one thing is certain about the tech boom, it is that the digital landscape is constantly evolving. It is easier to gain confidence when you understand that learning new things is an inherent part of using and benefitting from technology. And don’t be scared to learn from your students – they make great teachers, too!