{     Offering the Best Childhood Preparation for Social and Academic Success.     }

Archive for February, 2017

Meeting the Dentist

Your baby’s teeth are just as vital as your adult teeth. Primary teeth create space for permanent teeth. They also help your little one when she begins speaking and chewing food. According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, a child’s first dental visit should be after her first tooth arrives, and it should occur before her first birthday, whichever exciting event happens first.

twenty20_97663680-2916-4268-914b-ef8dbfd2ed4f

It is important to schedule a visit early. This will allow your dentist to check for any signs of dental problems, like tooth decay or issues from extended thumb sucking, before they become severe. The dentist can also show you the best way to clean your child’s teeth, recommend oral care products and answer any questions you may have about the growth of your child’s teeth. After assessing your child’s teeth, gums and jaw, your dentist can recommend when to schedule a second visit.

Density Experiment!

Young children benefit from active, hands-on activities that foster scientific learning. You can inspire your little scientist’s interests by conducting this easy and fun density experiment at home! Encourage your children to ask questions, learn from their mistakes, try again, explore new activities and come up with solutions.

density-experiment

Click here to watch the video or check out the complete instructions below!

Materials

  • Clear jar or container
  • Lightly colored water (blue or green works best)
  • Wooden block
  • Vegetable Oil
  • Marble
  • Bottle cap
  • Corn syrup
  • Plastic figurine
  • Coin
  • Flower petal
  • LEGO bricks (or other small items)
  • Eraser

Procedure

  1. Pour the water into the jar. Pour corn syrup into the jar. Pour the oil into jar.
    1. What happened to the liquids in the jar?
    2. Why do you think this happened?
  2. Make predictions about what will happen to the different objects before dropping them into the jar. Take turns dropping the objects into the jar.
    1. Were all of your predictions correct?
    2. If any predictions were not correct, why do you think the results were different from the predictions?

 

A Child’s First Pet

Many children plead, “Please mom, dad, I need one. I’ll take good care of it.” Can you guess what this is all about? Yes, that furry bundle of responsibility known as a pet. As parents, our first thoughts might be the dirty messes in our homes, the many extra expenses or the cold, nightly walks with a beloved fur ball in less than ideal weather. However, a pet can be a great friend for your child; it can teach him responsibility and provide him with many other benefits.

Processed with VSCOcam with c3 preset

Having a pet offers your child a best friend, a constant companion and an audience to listen to her imaginative stories. This will boost her confidence while she is learning to read. Some children can be shy about reading out loud. Reading to a pet can provide your child with a reason to practice reading aloud without feeling embarrassed, leading to increased reading skills over time.

Caring for a pet also teaches children responsibility by their having to perform simple tasks that are vital to an animal’s health. This includes feeding the pet on a schedule, cleaning up after the pet and providing it with exercise. Reinforcing the importance of responsibility, even at a young age, can help children learn valuable life lessons.

How does your family’s lovable furry friend benefit your child?

Build a “Snowman”: a Recipe for Fun!

Whether you live in the snowy northeast or sunny southwest, you and your child can build (and eat!) your own yummy snowman! Click here to watch the video tutorial!

banana-snowman

Ingredients (for one snowman):

  • 3 Thick slices of banana
  • 1 Pretzel stick (broken in half)
  • 1 Apple wedge
  • Several mini chocolate chips or small raisins

what-you-need

 

On a plate, line up the banana pieces to build the body of your snowman.

 

banana-slices

 

Add the apple wedge for a hat.

 

apple-hat

 

Add one half of the pretzel stick to each side of the second banana slice for arms.

 

pretzel-arms

 

Place the mini chocolate chips or raisins for eyes, a nose and buttons!

 

raisin-eyes

 

Get creative with other pieces of fruits and veggies and decorate your snowman with a scarf, mittens and even boots!

*An adult should oversee all recipes and activities.  Recipes and activities may not be appropriate for all ages.

 

Four Ways to Encourage Physical Activity

Physical activity and exercise are essential to your child’s development. Dr. Kyle Pruett, clinical professor of child psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine and member of The Goddard School Educational Advisory Board, offers four tips on how to twenty20_12c2b596-6dd8-40ba-b07e-cd5e2aef92fbencourage physical activity.

  1. Start with yourself. Set an example by being physically active, personally and with your child, and talking about how it helps you feel and think better.
  2. Encourage your child to pick activities that she finds fun, and then suggest activities that add something to it. For example, if your child enjoys running, ask her whether she’d like to kick a soccer or tennis ball while she runs. This can help children see how a supplemental activity adds to the fun as well as the ‘burn.’
  3. Whenever possible walk or ride (a bike or scooter, while wearing a helmet, of course) when you need to get somewhere nearby. Also, leave extra time to stop and smell the roses with your child. These simple times together end all too soon.
  4. Give children the space, tools and time to be physically active themselves and figure out what’s fun to master on their own. “I want to do it myself” is the battle cry of autonomy in these years and should be respected.