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Archive for July, 2018

Tips for a Child to Overcome Dental Phobia

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Even though this article was originally written with working mothers in mind, this is great information for all parents!

If you are out of the house for more than 8 hours a day, it can be quite difficult for you to control your kids’ dental anxiety, fear or phobia. TV, YouTube and conversation with other kids can be prospective sources of such phobias. However, it is very important for you to remove such apprehensions of the child for their own good. There are many emergency dental specialists in Brisbane, who can cure oral health issues among kids with anxiety without causing them any additional pain.

Dental anxiety can happen for a variety of reasons. Some children are afraid of their first visit to the dentist mainly due to a fear of the unknown. For others, a past experience can be responsible for a child’s refusal to visit the dentist’s clinic. However, there are a few steps you can do that can help your child.

Recognize the Fear: Talk to your child and observe its behaviour. Note down the causes of phobia you see. Once you understand them, it will be easier to find ways to get out of them.

Find a Good Dentist: While looking for the right dentist focus your search on a person who is specialised in treating anxious patients. Call them first and try to understand whether the communicator on the other side is accommodating or dismissive. The moment you are assured of the doctor’s attitude, you can decide to pay a visit along with the child.

Discuss the Cause of Anxiety: If your doubts are not completely gone after calling the clinic, it is time for you to talk them over with the doctor. Try giving the dentist a direct call to clarify all your suspicions. Confirm an appointment, only if you are completely convinced that the treatment procedure is tailored for children. Pain is the reason most children are afraid of the dentist as cartoon and TV have shown the dentist as a person who is always drilling teeth which is only a small part of what a dentist does.

Accompany Your Child for The Visit: Never send an apprehensive child for a dental appointment alone. Always accompany them. If possible, get the appointment at a time favourable for you to be with them. The child will be more confident if a parent is around.

Resort to Relaxation Exercises: Controlled breathing and different other exercises can help the child remain calm during the treatment. You can find the relaxation exercises on different relevant websites. Distractions can also be helpful in keeping the children relaxed during the treatment. As an accompanying parent, you can try and distract the kid. Note that most experienced dentist will know how to distract the child and make them feel comfortable.

It is always a tough exercise for a working mother to juggle between work and understanding child psychology. Hope the tips offered in this post will be of much help to the parents.The dentist is one of those things that your child might never enjoy as people rarely do. This hygiene will allow them to have a great smile and avoid costly dental procedures later in life.

 

This article was written by Emily Green from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

5 Ways to Head Off a Discipline Problem So It Won’t Derail Your Day

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Why making space for kids’ feelings can be a game-changer.

It’s that familiar scene. Child care pickup. Your child is thrilled to see you and then 20 minutes later, he melts down because you cooked chicken for dinner instead of pasta. As a working mother, tantrums can feel all the more painful because they’re ruining those precious few moments you get with your little ones.

It doesn’t have to be that way. In the past five years, I discovered dozens of new discipline ideas, while reporting my book The Good News About Bad Behavior: Why Kids Are Less Disciplined Than Ever—And What to Do About It. Here are just a few of the winning strategies I found for stopping a discipline problem in its tracks. The next time you’re at a loss, try one of these.

1. Pause

First of all, shed any guilt you may feel about not spending enough time with your kids, as compared to your mother or your mother-in-law. The truth is, modern parents spend more time with kids than at any time since the Bureau of Labor Statistics began keeping time use data. Even as women flooded into the workforce between 1965 and 2015, mothers’ time spent caring for children rose from 10 hours to 15 hours a week. Dad’s time on child care leaped from 2.5 to 7 hours in that same time period.

Take a breath. Or two. When we pause before responding, we’re giving our nervous systems a chance to regulate. Then, we can better access the part of our brains that is creative and solves problems. We can find better strategies than yelling or ordering a time out. We might even lead our children into a more regulated state themselves.

Use that pause to shift your perspective. Yes, the family’s priority is getting dinner on the table and moving into the bedtime routine. But your child’s interests and preferences also matter. It doesn’t cost you that much time to take a minute to empathize and say, “I know, you really love pasta!” before moving smoothly on with your evening. That moment of acknowledgement is more likely to ease your child out of a tantrum than saying, in an annoyed voice, “We had pasta three times this week already!”

2. Deploy Humor

Children are sometimes so … childish! They giggle at farts and still half-believe that possibly, monsters may inhabit the patch of woods down the street. Harness their love of humor! If you tickle their funny bone, you can distract them out of a power struggle before they dig in too deep.

For example, when our children were just learning table manners, my husband Brian made up an alternate family—the Bewis family—that was filled with badly behaved boys. We could invoke the Bewis boys when we saw a child eating with their hands, or leaving the table without picking up a plate. “I hear the Bewis boys never clear their plates,” we would say. They’d giggle and retrieve their plates while making up their own stories of terrible goings on in the Bewis household.

You can also use make believe to empathize with a child’s impractical yet deeply-held desire, rather than trying to force him or her to comply with yours. For example: “Oh, if I had a magic wand, I would wave it so we all could go to Disneyland tomorrow! That would be so much more fun than school.” Being understood defuses your child’s growing upset. You don’t need to be the one to rain on your child’s parade—life will do that soon enough.

3. Give Choices

This is such common parenting advice, it’s almost a cliché. Bear with me. Often, when we give a child a choice, we’re only offering two things that we want the child to do—neither of which they want. As they grow, they see right through that farce.

Instead, open your mind to what your child wants. Sure, it may be impractical. Consider whether it’s truly impossible. Be creative about whether you can accommodate their wishes. If there’s no harm done … say yes.

Who cares if they wear the same favorite pants three days in a row, as long as they’re not obviously dirty? And if French toast is a healthy meal for breakfast, why not have it occasionally for dinner? Does it really matter whether your child gets dressed before coming down for breakfast? Maybe it’s okay for him to pop back upstairs to change out of pajamas—or even sleep in the clean sweats he’s going to wear to school. A child who’s doing what he wants moves a whole lot faster than one who’s being forced by mom.

I’m not talking about becoming a short-order cook or a servant to your child’s whims. But as your children get older, they increasingly want to contribute ideas and influence what the family does. If your children always hate what’s for dinner, invite them to suggest some meals, or even go shopping with you. Create a rotating schedule of dinners that everyone has agreed to in advance. The more they’re involved in the process, the less they’ll object. Yes, this takes more time at first, but your hard work will pay off when you have an 11-year old who can plan and cook the family dinner.

 

The Good News About Bad Behavior

 

Katherine Reynolds Lewis is a Washington, D.C.–area journalist, mother of three and author of The Good News About Bad Behavior: Why Kids Are Less Disciplined Than Ever—And What to Do About It, *available from PublicAffairs, an imprint of Perseus Books, LLC, a subsidiary of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Courtesy of PublicAffairs

4. Connect

There are so many opportunities to connect with our children. The drive to school or walk to the bus stop. The time after dinner when we’re all full and happy. An early morning snuggle before the rest of the family wakes.

But often we fail to take advantage of these fleeting moments. The to-do list or the window to check email seems more pressing. Resist this temptation. Work when you need to work; be with your family when you can. Don’t let the two contaminate each other unintentionally.

Every time you focus just on your child—playing Candyland or listening to a long story about a favorite YouTuber—you are depositing into the bank of your relationship. That undistracted time will serve as a reserve for you to draw on the next time there’s conflict in your relationship, or a power struggle starts to loom.

It doesn’t have to be a half hour or hour of your time. You’ll see the pay-off from even five minutes throwing the ball, or a sincere thank you for something they did to help you. Start keeping track of the times when you truly connect with each child, and see if you can boost that number over time—like a plank challenge or other goal you set for yourself.

5. Plan Ahead

Sometimes, all of our best efforts fail. A hungry or tired child simply cannot do what’s needed in a situation. Or something unexpected happens and your little one spirals out of control. Maybe everyone screams—or cries. That’s not a disaster. It’s an opportunity for you to learn.

Take stock of the experience at a later time when everyone is calm. If your kids are old enough, ask them what it was like for them. Brainstorm what might help in the future to prevent such problems. Routines are a huge boon to smooth family life, and keep discipline problems from erupting even before they begin.

An earlier bedtime can help with the morning routine. Reminder signs on the wall can spark a child’s memory without Mom nagging about backpack or teeth brushing. Small children can help make signs for the daily routines, either taking photos of each step or crayoning their own interpretation.

Don’t worry about having a consequence or a reaction for every instance of childish misbehavior. You can usually count on the same problem cropping up again, by which time you’ll be ready with your brainstormed solution.

 

This article was written by Katherine Reynolds Lewis from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

The One Simple Thing That Finally Got My Kids to Stop Fighting

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Tired of sibling squabbles over toys, devices, and anything else they can think of? So was I—till I tried this mom-tested strategy that actually worked!

Remember when you thought your kids would be best friends, sharing toys and learning from each other in harmony every day of their lives? If so, I bet you also remember the first time they fought over a toy (or piece of cake, or stool at the kitchen island, or, or, or…).

The truth is, unless your kid is an only child, you’ve likely witnessed sibling squabbles every day of your parenting life. Older siblings will lose their cool when a younger sibling infringes on their territory. And that younger sibling knows just how to push the button that causes their older sib to lose it.

Honestly, it left me fed up and exhausted. There are plenty of toys in the house—so why must they fight over that tiny plastic duck that no one cared about yesterday?

Since my usual approach—lengthy lectures about the benefits of compromise—didn’t seem to be working, I asked my friend Cheryl Butler, aka Mighty Mommy, for advice.

To combat the warlike atmosphere in my home, Cheryl, a mother of eight who somehow finds time to write and podcast about her experiences, suggested putting up a set of household rules in a heavily-trafficked area. Each rule focuses on a particular behavior that is a barrier to peace. My list looked like this:

1. In a conflict, no hurting (hitting, kicking, pinching, spitting) is ever allowed. If this happens, the consequence is no screen time for a week.

2. No name-calling or personal insults about someone’s physical appearance. Consequence same as in Rule #1.

3. If anyone is fighting over a toy, that toy goes into time-out. No questions asked.

4. Any person who demands to be first, will go last.

5. Whatever is borrowed must be returned. If it isn’t, the consequence is that the borrower must choose an item from their sibling’s room to replace the missing one.*

*It’s a good idea to institute a borrowing protocol in which the child who borrows something from a sibling must put up collateral—a possession that will be returned only when the borrowed item is returned. (This is particularly effective once your kids have gadgets).

Amazingly, once these rules were written down, they were harder for my kids to ignore—and even harder to argue with. So the next time a toy became the cause of World War III, I simply took it away and wordlessly pointed to Rule #3. It’s not my rule, kids—it’s the house rule. And it’s helped restore peace and sanity to our home.

 

This article was written by Beata Santora from Real Simple and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

This Shockingly Simple Move Stopped My Kid From Constantly Interrupting Me

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If you’ve had enough of “Mom, mom, mom, mom, mooooom!” this little trick is for you.

We’ve all been there: You’re at the playground trying to chat with a fellow parent, when your kid unceremoniously interrupts the conversation because he wants to tell you something urgent about squirrels. Or superheroes. Or whatever else he’s thinking about. You discuss the rules of conversation, and he agrees to wait patiently for his turn to speak next time, but the excitement of his thoughts is overwhelming and he’s soon interrupting again.

I’ve been in this boat for years. No matter how much we discussed it, my seven-year-old son just couldn’t help himself. It was like Pavlov’s dogs—the moment I got on a phone call, he needed to talk to me. So I asked my friend Cheryl Butler, a mother of 8 (eight!!) well-behaved, polite children and host of the Mighty Mommy podcast, for her advice.

Cheryl suggested this simple trick: “Teach your child to place his hand on your wrist if he wants something while you’re busy talking to another adult. Then you put your hand over his to acknowledge him and continue your conversation without stopping to ask what he wants. After you finish, turn to your child and give him your full attention. This way you reinforce two critical life skills: good manners and patience.”

It’s a technique that avoids lengthy lectures and is based on cognitive behavioral therapy: After training your child to wait for you to finish what you’re doing, you’re rewarding him with your undivided attention.

It seemed almost too simple to work, but I decided to try: The first few times, my son chafed against having to wait, bouncing up and down excitedly saying “Mom, Mom, Mom, but Mom, I need to tell you something.” I did my best to ignore him, even taking a few steps away to put some distance between us. Then after I was done, I turned toward him, crouched down to his level, and gave him my undivided attention, making sure to commend his patience.

It took a few tries—Cheryl warned me that I’d have to stick with it—but within a few weeks there was almost no interruption. For the first time, I can actually finish an entire conversation with a friend before learning that fascinating fact about squirrels.

 

This article was written by Beata Santora from Real Simple and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Be A Guide, Not A Guard: How To Raise A Happy And Responsible Kid

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“Be a guide, not a guard” perfectly describes the kinds of parenting behaviors that create happy and responsible children. It’s a term I learned at a recent training session focused on reducing controlling parenting behaviors.

When I ask parents “what have you tried to help change your child’s behavior?” little breaks my heart more than hearing a long list of punishments. The story will go something like, “the rule is that he is to clean up his room but he never does it so we took away his tablet, then banned watching TV, we put him in time out all day, cancelled his play dates with his friends and then grounded him for a month. It doesn’t matter what we do, he doesn’t care.”

This is parenting like a guard. It is inflexible, rules-based parenting that requires punishment when a child doesn’t behave. The most anti-social children are often parented in this way. They don’t care about the meaning of the rules set; instead they decide whether to comply based on whether they will get hurt. Controlling parenting practices are also correlated to poor mental health in children and youth.

When we parent like a guard we are trying to stop behavior through control and dominance. In an attempt to get rid of the behaviors we don’t like, we use consequences. A guard expects trouble and treats people as such. A guard does not care whether you feel sad, confused or don’t feel like you belong. A guard only cares if you comply. As a guard we can’t be flexible and this means if a child doesn’t comply, regardless of the reason, our only option is to escalate the consequences until they do. Even if this means excluding them from the very systems we want them to belong to.

When we parent as a guide we work to encourage behaviors we want to see in our children. We help children belong in our world and all the systems that come with that. We use care and compassion in our parenting practices. When we see unwanted behavior that cannot work or is unacceptable in our systems, we look at what steps we can take to help that child learn to fit better in our world. We don’t use harsh consequences that will exclude the child from the system; instead we see their difficulty as a skill deficit. We don’t use escalating consequences; instead we look for ways for children to want to be part of the system and to want to please us.

As guides, we help children develop internal motivation to do what is right because it’s right, rather than to do what is right to avoid being punished. We want our children to comply because they want to be part of our community, they want to help us and because they understand the value of their chosen behavior.

How To Be A Guide

1. See your child’s perspective.

Being able to hold your child’s perspective is essential to being a guide. It helps parents understand how best to help their child. It helps us identify that difficult behaviors are often related to emotions or skills deficits. This doesn’t mean we accept all behaviors as okay, it means that we understand that there is a meaning to whatever behavior we are seeing.

2. Encourage behavior through praise and noticing.

Children love receiving genuine praise and being noticed. If they feel you genuinely care about them rather than that you are trying to control their behavior, they are more motivated to work for you. Children are less receptive to praise that functions to control behavior such as “aren’t you a good boy for sitting up straight today?” A genuine, “I can really see you are listening, and that makes me feel good,” is more effective.

3. Promote values-based living.

Show your child what matters through the way you live. If you want to raise a kind and responsible child, lead by modeling kind and responsible behavior. Notice when your child is kind and responsible and praise the behavior.

4. Be flexible where possible.

Give your child opportunities to choose. Avoid controlling choices unless there is a good reason not to offer a choice such as safety or legality. Guides raise kids who choose to be responsible. Guards raise kids who conform to avoid a consequence.

5. Promote intrinsic goals over extrinsic goals.

Encourage your child to do things for personal growth, for health, to create meaningful relationships and contribute to their community as opposed to doing things to achieve financial success, popularity, power or for their image. People with intrinsic goals are happier and engage in more pro-social behavior.

Next time you see your child doing something that you don’t like, whisper to yourself: “Be a guide, not a guard.”

Acknowledgement: Thanks and gratitude toDarin Cairnsfor introducing me to the helpful term “Be a guide, not a guard.”

 

This article was written by Motherly from Huffington Post and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

7 Signs You’re Suffering from Working Mommy Burnout—and What to Do About It

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Even though this article was originally written with working mothers in mind, this is great information for all parents!

Chronic stress can lead to burnout, both in the workplace and in our homes. Here’s how to fight back.

In my psychology practice, I meet weekly with moms who work both inside and outside of the home. While their feelings are often the same—questioning their purpose in life, not sure if they should continue to do what they are doing and a constant feeling of exhaustion, the specific triggers for their burnout can differ based on their working situations.

The reality is most moms believe the other side of the “work” fence is better. If they are a stay-at-home mom they think they would feel better and less stifled if they were outside the home every day. Mothers who go to an office or a similar workspace might be overwhelmed and wonder if they should find a way to be home. When stressed, bored or frustrated, moms in either situation instantly begin looking for reasons to change their work status.

Whether you work at home or out, or even if you don’t work at all, it is a decision that is based on your particular family’s needs and values. But if you do work outside of the home, this can create a unique set of stressors that can add to your negative feelings. Chief among these stressors is guilt, and there is no guilt like mommy guilt. You feel guilty for leaving your kids in the morning, working late nights, not cooking homemade dinners more often, being on your computer even after a long day’s work, missing soccer games or play practice—the list goes on and on.

Many working moms have had their children ask them questions such as, “Are you ever going to stop working?” The feeling of being torn between two worlds, never having enough time and feeling as if we are not fully successful in either endeavor wears on us. But still we march on, trying to be in two places at once, trying to advance our careers while pretending our minds aren’t distracted by concerns for our kids and ignoring our own personal and health needs.

You may be thinking all these feelings are just part and parcel of being a mother. No one ever said it was going to be easy, right? With a little wine and some humor, you’ll be okay, right? And while stress is a part of all our daily lives, chronic stress wreaks havoc on our minds, bodies and our perception of being smart and competent mothers. Chronic stress can lead to burnout—both in the workplace and in our homes.

Read on to see if you may be suffering from working mommy burnout:

1. You constantly question why you do what you do, and no longer take joy in work you once loved.

2. You think what you do (paid work or staying home your kids) may not be worth the stress it causes or the money you earn.

3. You still wonder who you will be when you “grow up” because, even at this age, you don’t feel like you are able to achieve what you want in life—whether it is financial success, recognition, or enjoyment.

4. You feel time is running out to achieve your dreams, and you don’t know the next steps to take to accomplish them, in your profession or your personal life.

5. You feel like you should be working if you are at home with your kids and vice versa.

6. You wonder about the purpose of life in general and constantly question if doing something different will bring you closer to clarity.

7. You secretly have something you want to do in life—start a business, write a novel, go back for your graduate degree, run a marathon—but it feels too big to even attempt.

If two or more of the above symptoms sound familiar, you may be experiencing what I refer to as the working mom’s dilemma, which can lead directly to mommy burnout. The great thing is moms don’t have to accept these feelings as their normal. There are some easy-to-implement changes that can be done to cope with working mom stress.

Learn to ask for and receive help. You don’t have to do everything on your own to be a good mom, or a good employee!

Be protective and intentional about your time. Say yes to the most important things at home and work and no to the things you don’t have to or want to do.

Teach your kids independence while they are toddlers. These important life skills like clearing a plate, getting dressed or brushing teeth on their own will make a working mother’s life much better in the long run. If your child is already older, it is never too late to drill the independence lesson. Start today.

Set one achievable goal a day. Do your best to accomplish that goal, and don’t beat yourself up if you don’t get to it. It’s a goal, not a life or death situation!

Being a working mom can be a challenge whether you love your job or have to work to make ends meet. It is also an opportunity to be a wonderful role model for our children and to do their best to achieve their dreams. Finding and making peace with our purpose as a working mom is essential to being able to enjoy life every day. It helps us to be present, to gain focus on what is most important and to integrate the challenges we all experience as part of our journey.


Dr. Sheryl Ziegler, MD, is a doctor of psychology and licensed professional counselor. She is the author of Mommy Burnout: How to Reclaim Your Life and Raise Healthier Children in the Process

 

This article was written by Dr. Sheryl Ziegler from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

7 Healthy Lunches Your Kids Will Actually Eat (That Aren’t PB&J)

Truth: Your kids are just as sick of eating the same old turkey-and-cucumber sandwich as you are of making it. Win the Best Mom Ever award and pack some of these exciting but totally practical (read: neat, portable and edible at room temp) lunch-box goodies instead. BLT pasta salad FTW.

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Rainbow Collard Wraps with Peanut Butter Dipping Sauce

Finally, a sandwich you can make ahead (because it won’t get soggy).

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

BLT Pasta Salad

It’s impossible to resist this crunchy-and-creamy combo.

Get the recipe

 

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Italian Deli Pinwheel Sandwiches

Anything but a sad lunch wrap.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Greek Yogurt Chicken Salad Stuffed Peppers

Your kiddo will devour these healthy, colorful boats.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Mini Chicken Shawarma

Tip: Wrap these guys up in waxed paper to keep them extra fresh.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Lunch Kebabs with Mortadella, Artichoke and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

Psst: Your little ones can totally help assemble these the night before.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Vegetarian Sushi Cups

Finger food is the best food.

Get the recipe

 

This article was from PureWow and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

What to Do If Your Child Chips, Loosens or Loses a Tooth

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Don’t panic if your child chips, loosens or loses a tooth. But do allow a dentist to assess and repair the damage without delay, says pediatric dentist Trista Onesti, DDS.

“A quick response can mean the difference between preserving and losing the tooth. And early tooth trauma can cause problems with adult teeth as your child grows,” Dr. Onesti says.

Common tooth scenarios: chipped, loose or lost

If your child fractures or chips a tooth, call your dentist instead of the emergency department. Most dentists have an emergency hotline you can call when an accident occurs outside of operating hours. Acting quickly is important.

When an adult tooth is knocked loose, a dentist will need to secure it quickly. He or she may need to secure the tooth with stabilizing wires or dental material as soon as possible. Contrary to popular belief, there are also important things to consider if a baby tooth is knocked loose.

If your child loses an adult tooth, someone must re-insert it as soon as possible. Whoever is nearby — a parent or coach, for instance — should gently, but quickly clean the tooth and push it back into the socket. Many people don’t know that you have less than an hour to do this before the likelihood of saving the tooth long-term is jeopardized.

How tooth trauma can affect kids later

Early tooth trauma can have long-term effects. Down the road, a child may have nerve damage that relates to early tooth trauma.

“Sometimes the damage is immediately apparent, but other times it may develop over months or even years,” Dr. Onesti says.

Trauma can provoke inflammation, which may damage the tooth’s root or nerve over time. If this continues, a root canal may be needed down the road; in some cases, it may even be necessary to extract the tooth. Therefore, it is important to inform your dentist of all previous traumatic incidents so he or she can evaluate with the necessary X-rays.

The bottom line: The best way to protect your child’s teeth — now and in the future — is to get him or her to the dentist as quickly as possible when tooth trauma occurs.

 

 

This article was written by Children’s Health Team from Cleveland Clinic and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

10 Super Quick, Super Healthy Kid-Friendly Dinners

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Easy recipes to get your whole family eating well.

Eating well should not be an unattainable fantasy for you and your family. These recipes from the Trim Healthy Table cookbook take the traditional meals you and your family already love, and make them healthier. They will help you reach your goal of staying fit as well as improve the overall well-being of your family. Never assume you are too busy to make health a priority. The tips and tricks in these meals make it simple, and help you take baby steps to living a healthier lifestyle.

Deconstructed Fajitas

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

This is such a quick no-brainer for busy nights when you need dinner on the table in ten minutes. We enjoy this on dinner plates over a bunch of cut lettuce, but if you prefer you can stuff into low-carb tortillas.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons coconut oil or butter 1 large onion and 2 to 3 green or red peppers, sliced
4 to 6 cups sliced precooked chicken breast
2 teaspoons chili powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional for heat lovers)

1 teaspoon Mineral Salt
1 teaspoon paprika (smoked or regular)
2 fresh tomatoes, sliced, or 1 (14.5-ounce) can diced, re-roasted tomatoes, drained Lots of cut lettuce (e.g., a couple hearts of romaine at least) 
Greek yogurt Sour cream
 Sliced avocado Grated cheese Brown rice or quinoa

Directions

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add the coconut oil. Add the peppers and onions, tossing frequently for a few minutes until they begin to soften. Add the chicken, sprinkle on the chili powder, onion powder, cumin, cayenne (if using), salt, and paprika, and toss with the veggies for a couple more minutes. Add the tomatoes. Cook for 2 to 3 more minutes.

  2. Serve on generous beds of lettuce and add toppings according to which fuel you decide on.

Black Pepper Chicken

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Who wouldn’t love healthy Chinese takeout?

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

Think Chinese takeout, but ultra-healthy and made in a jiffy! Here’s a time-saving tip—the night before, or the morning of, you can put the chicken in the marinade in a gallon-size baggie and refrigerate so it is all ready to go right before dinnertime. While you are at it, you may want to make double the amount of chicken and marinade. Put one of the bags in the freezer for a no-think, no-fuss dinner another night.

Ingredients

2 1⁄2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts or thighs, thawed if frozen, cut into 1⁄2-inch pieces (easily done with kitchen scissors)
1⁄4 cup plus 2 tablespoons soy sauce
1⁄2 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon garlic powder
21⁄2 teaspoons black pepper, or
 3 teaspoons if you like more heat
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
4 tablespoons coconut oil

1 onion, sliced
 6 celery stalks, finely sliced

1⁄2 large head cabbage, finely sliced, or 1 (16-ounce) bag pre-sliced cabbage or coleslaw

Directions

  1. Place the chicken pieces in a bowl and add 1⁄4 cup of the soy sauce, the ginger, onion powder, garlic powder, pepper, and vinegar. Allow to marinate for 10 minutes or so while you chop the vegetables (or do as described above and start marinating the night before or in the morning).

  2. Melt 2 tablespoons of the coconut oil in a large skillet over high heat. Once hot, add the marinated chicken. Allow the chicken to cook for a couple minutes on one side, then toss periodically in the hot oil for 3 to 4 more minutes or until just done. Transfer the chicken to a plate.

  3. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons coconut oil and all the veggies to the skillet. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce and toss the veggies for 3 to 4 minutes, or until slightly wilted but still a bit crispy. Return the chicken to the pan, toss through and serve.

World’s Laziest Lasagna Skillet

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Any recipe with ‘lazy’ in the title is bound to be perfect for busy weeknights.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half)

We gave you Lazy Lasagna, one of the most popular recipes in Trim Healthy Mama cookbook, but now we have an even lazier version. No baking time—just throw it all in your skillet, then scoop into your mouth. Kids love this, too, and it makes sure they get a good dose of healthy greens in their dinner!

Ingredients

2 pounds ground beef, turkey, or venison, thawed if frozen
20 ounces no-sugar-added pizza or spaghetti sauce
11⁄2 tablespoons dried oregano
1⁄2 teaspoon Mineral Salt

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon garlic powder
1⁄8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 to 2 doonks Pure Stevia Extract Powder
16 ounces fresh spinach

1 (8-ounce) package 1⁄3 less fat cream cheese

1 (14-ounce) container 1% cottage cheese

8 ounces part-skim mozzarella cheese, grated

Directions

  1. Brown the meat in a large skillet over medium-high heat, then drain off any excess fat.

  2. Add the pizza sauce, oregano, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne, and stevia powder (if using). Add the spinach (you may need to add half the spinach, stir until it wilts a little, then add the rest). Reduce the heat to medium-low and allow to simmer.

  3. Place the cream cheese and cottage cheese in a food processor and process until smooth. Add to the skillet. Allow all the ingredients to simmer a few more minutes, then you’re done.

  4. Top each plate with grated mozzarella.

Sesame Lo Mein

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Carbs you can feel good about.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, but do not freeze, as Konjac noodles don’t freeze well.)

Load your plate high with scrumptious noodles and slim down! Bet nobody has told you that before. Before you even have time to make a phone call for Chinese takeout, you can have this deliciousness ready for your table within 15 to 20 minutes. You’ll save time and you’ll save your waistline! We use two kinds of noodles in this dish for double the slimming power. It has konjac-based noodles, which are so fat-blasting and wonderful, and zucchini or yellow squash noodles, which we call “Troodles.” If you are not yet a fan of konjac-based noodles, you can use all Troodles, just double up on the zucchini.

Ingredients

2 teaspoons butter or coconut oil
3 to 4 garlic cloves, minced

2 cups of any chopped veggies you have lying around such as onion, red bell peppers, zucchini, radishes, and carrots; you can also include a few tablespoons frozen peas
3 single-serve bags konjac noodles, such as our Trim Healthy Noodles or Not Naughty Noodles, well rinsed and drained
1 to 2 tablespoons Nutritional Yeast (optional)
1⁄4 cup soy sauce, or a few good squirts Bragg liquid aminos or coconut aminos
Red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper to taste
2 to 4 medium zucchini or yellow squash, spiralized into Troodles (zucchini noodles)
4 large eggs
2 to 3 cups precooked or canned meat, such as diced chicken breast, salmon, or ground meat
3 to 4 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
3 to 4 green onions (optional), diced

Directions

  1. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and toss in the butter for about a minute. Add the seasoning blend or chopped veggies and toss for another 2 to 3 minutes, or until softened. If using frozen veggies, toss on high.

  2. Add the Trim Healthy Noodles or Not Naughty Noodles to the pan, increase the heat to high, and stir with a fork as they cook. While they are cooking, add the nutritional yeast (if using), soy sauce, and red pepper flakes. Toss them over high heat for a couple minutes, then add the Troodles and allow to cook for few minutes, tossing well. At first you think there are too many Troodles … have faith, they will wilt.

  3. Push the noodles and veggies to one side of your skillet. Reduce the heat to medium and crack the eggs into the skillet. Stir and cut the eggs with your spatula, flip a few times while they cook, then toss them with all the other ingredients in the skillet. Add your precooked protein, continuing to heat the ingredients until the meat is warmed through. Top with the sesame oil and green onions (if using). Stir and lift the noodles so that they get coated with the sesame oil. Taste, then add more soy sauce, pepper, or other favorite Asian seasoning until it makes you say “Yeah Baby!”

Chicken, Broccoli, Mushroom Stir-Fry

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Make your life easier by preparing the sauce in advance.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

Your house will smell as wondrous as a Japanese restaurant when you make this. Watch your family wolf it down, never knowing there is a healthy secret ingredient in the sauce (so long as you don’t tell!).

Ingredients

1 cup chicken broth

1 cup frozen diced okra

1⁄3 cup soy sauce, or several generous squirts Bragg liquid aminos

21⁄2 teaspoons Pure Stevia Extract Powder
1⁄2 teaspoon Gluccie
2 tablespoons coconut oil or sesame oil

21⁄2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts (thawed if frozen), cut into 1⁄2-inch pieces (quickest with kitchen scissors)
Mineral Salt and black pepper

3 to 4 garlic cloves, minced

1 generous teaspoon finely grated or minced fresh ginger

2 (12-ounce) bags frozen broccoli, or fresh broccoli florets from a large head

8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)

Directions

  1. Prepare the sauce in advance. Put the chicken broth, okra, soy sauce, sweetener, and Gluccie in a blender and blend on high until completely broken down … we mean blend the daylights out of it so no bits of okra are left.

  2. Melt 1 tablespoon of the oil in a skillet over high heat. Season the chicken pieces with salt and pepper, add them to the skillet, and cook for 4 minutes, turning once. Remove them from the pan and set aside.

  3. Reduce the heat to medium. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, the garlic and ginger. Toss in the oil for about 30 seconds, then stir in the frozen broccoli. Increase the heat to medium-high, cover, and cook for about 2 1⁄2 minutes. Stir in the mushrooms, cover, and cook for another 21⁄2 minutes (if using fresh broccoli, add later with the mushrooms and cook without covering for several minutes, tossing often).

  4. Uncover, pour in the sauce, and cook on high for 5 to 6 more minutes, returning the chicken for the last 3 minutes and adding the pepper flakes (if using).

Save My Sanity Chili

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

It’s all in the title of the recipe.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

When life gets chaotic, this meal can come to your rescue. Throw it in the crockpot in the morning and you’ll be able to breathe a sigh of relief knowing that supper is taken care of (or make it in a jiffy in your pressure cooker). This tasty chili is a no-brainer since it saves you a whole prep step. Most chili recipes that call for ground meat ask you to brown the meat and onions first, but we know life can be crazy busy and sometimes that just might be the 10 to 15 minutes you don’t have! We don’t want you giving in and considering picking up drive-thru food because you don’t have time to cook. So no more excuses—extra steps are outta here! Throw all the ingredients in your trusty crockpot and come back in the evening to deliciousness! Now, let’s say your life is extra crazy and you forget to prepare your crockpot meal in the morning but you don’t have an electric pressure cooker. No worries—this can be made in a pot on the stove in about 30 minutes—just brown your meat and onions, add all the other ingredients, and let it bubble away.

Ingredients

2 pounds ultra-lean (96%) ground turkey or venison, thawed if frozen
2 (10- to 12-ounce) bags frozen small-cut vegetables, such as green and red bell peppers
2 (14.5-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
1 (10-ounce) can Rotel-style diced tomatoes and green chilies (hot, medium, or mild)

2 (15-ounce) cans pinto beans, rinsed and drained

2 (15-ounce) cans white beans, such as cannellini or Great Northern, rinsed and drained

1 quart chicken broth

3 tablespoons chili powder

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 teaspoon dried oregano

11⁄2 teaspoons Mineral Salt

1⁄4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional, depending on your heat preference)

Directions

  1. Place the meat in the bottom of a crockpot and break up with a fork to spread around the bottom of the crock. Add all the other ingredients and mix well.

  2. Cover and cook on low for 5 to 7 hours. Once the chili is ready, break up any larger chunks of meat.

ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER DIRECTIONS: Cook the meat on sauté mode, then add all the other ingredients. Seal and cook at low pressure for 10 minutes. Use the quick pressure release.

Slow Cooker Buffalo Chicken

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Original Frank’s hot sauce tastes delicious on anything and everything.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

This is flavorful, hearty and so versatile! Please don’t be scared if you are not a spice lover. Just be sure to buy the original Frank’s hot sauce, not the “hot” kind. And if you’re still timid, pull back the amount of sauce to 1 or even 1⁄2 cup. That will give you a very mild heat level but still lots of flavor.

Ingredients

21⁄2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts or thighs, thawed if frozen
4 tablespoons (1⁄2 stick) butter

11⁄4 cups Frank’s original hot sauce (reduce if you don’t like heat)
1 (10- to 12-ounce) bag frozen small-cut veggies
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 teaspoons dried parsley flakes

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1⁄2 teaspoon garlic powder

1⁄2 teaspoon onion powder

1⁄2 teaspoon Mineral Salt

1⁄2 teaspoon black pepper

1⁄2 cup sour cream (optional)

Directions

  1. Put the seasoning blend at the bottom of a slow cooker. Add all the other ingredients except for the sour cream. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours. Shred the chicken with 2 forks (it will fall apart easily). If using sour cream, stir it in well.

ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER DIRECTIONS: Add all the ingredients except the sour cream to a pressure cooker. Seal and cook at high pressure for 12 minutes. Use natural pressure release for at least 10 minutes, followed by quick pressure release. Stir in the sour cream and shred the chicken.

NOTE: When wrapping or stuffing this into lettuce or tortillas, use a slotted spoon or tongs to remove the chicken from the slow cooker and try not to get too much of the broth so it won’t be too messy.

Succulent Barbacoa Beef

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Bring Chipotle-style bowls to your kitchen table.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

We love Chipotle restaurants—so easy to stay on plan there using their bowl option. We love ordering their barbacoa beef or chicken, including the sautéed veggies, and putting it all over lettuce and salsa, then topping with lots of guac and a sprinkle of cheese. Mmmm … Amazing! Or sometimes we add some brown rice and beans. You can make something similar to their succulent beef (our very favorite menu item there) at home. Here is our version.

Ingredients

2 1⁄2 to 3 pounds beef chuck roast, cut into thirds
1 onion, cut into chunks

1 to 3 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce from a can (using 3 is lovely and spicy, but if you don’t like a whole lot of spice, pull back to 1 or 2 and rinse the sauce off a little)
4 to 6 garlic cloves, minced
2 to 3 tablespoons lime juice (fresh or bottled)

3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
3⁄4 cup water or beef broth

1 tablespoon ground cumin

2 teaspoons dried oregano

11⁄2 teaspoons Mineral Salt

1 teaspoon black pepper

Directions

  1. Place the beef in the bottom of a slow cooker. Put all the other ingredients in a blender and blend well. Pour the contents of the blender over the beef. Cover and cook on low for 7 to 8 hours. Break the beef apart once cooked … you don’t have to completely shred, but pulling most of it apart allows it to drink up all the delicious juices.

ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER DIRECTIONS: Coat the pressure cooker pot with coconut oil spray and place all the ingredients in the pot, including the blended sauce. Seal and cook at high pressure for 50 minutes. Use natural pressure release.

Cheesy Chicken Spaghetti Casserole

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Cheesy noodles without the fat.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 to 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, but do not freeze, as Konjac noodles don’t freeze well.)

This is ooey-gooey, noodley, cheesy goodness. Regular white noodles when mixed with cheese are one of the most fattening and health-destroying foods on this planet. Konjac noodles, such as our Trim Healthy or Not Naughty noodles, allow you to enjoy that oh-so-magnificent combination of cheese and noodles without widening your waistline.

Ingredients

4 single-serve bags of konjac noddles, such as out Trim Healthy Noodles or Not Naughty Noodles, well rinsed and drained
5 cups diced cooked chicken breast, or diced rotisserie chicken
1 (10-ounce can) Rotel-style diced tomatoes and green chilies, drained
11⁄2 (8-ounce) packages 1⁄3 less fat cream cheese
1⁄2 cup chicken broth

11⁄2 teaspoons Mineral Salt

1⁄2 teaspoon black pepper

1 teaspoon paprika

1 teaspoon chili powder

1⁄2 teaspoon onion powder

1⁄2 teaspoon garlic powder

3 cups (12 ounces) grated cheddar cheese

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

  2. Snip the noodles a bit smaller with kitchen scissors so they are not too terribly long. Put the diced chicken, noodles, and diced tomatoes and chilies in a 9 × 13-inch baking dish.

  3. Put the cream cheese, broth, salt, pepper, paprika, chili powder, onion powder, and garlic powder in a blender and blend until smooth. Scrape the mixture into the baking dish using a spatula. Mix in 2 cups of the cheddar. Top with the remaining cheddar and bake for 30 to 35 minutes. Broil for just a couple minutes at the end to make sure all the cheese is golden brown and bubbling, but watch it doesn’t burn.

Flaky Parmesan Tilapia

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

An inexpensive way to try something new with your family.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller)

This is a quick and easy way to include more fish in your life. There is only so much chicken and red meat you can eat, so please make room for fish! It is a wonderful, slimming part of a balanced-protein approach. This recipe is incredibly flaky and full of flavor, and it’s a great way to get your children to start liking fish. It need not be expensive, either. You can buy 2 pounds of frozen tilapia fillets from any landlocked grocery store inexpensively and thaw them before cooking. If you don’t like the idea of using tilapia, use any other thin white fish of your liking.

Ingredients

2 pounds tilapia or other thin white fish fillets, thawed if frozen
4 tablespoons (1⁄2 stick) butter, melted
Black pepper

Red pepper flakes (optional)

3⁄4 cup grated Parmesan cheese 

1⁄4 cup mayonnaise

2 heaping tablespoons Greek yogurt

3⁄4 teaspoon dried dill

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to a high broil.

  2. Rinse the fish and pat it dry. Place it in a single layer (no overlap) in an extra-large baking dish or 2 medium baking dishes. Pour the melted butter over the top and turn each fillet in the butter to coat well on both sides. Sprinkle lightly with black pepper and pepper flakes (if using).

  3. Combine the Parmesan, mayo, yogurt, and dill in a bowl and stir until a paste forms. Set aside.

  4. Put the fish on the second rack from the top of the oven and broil for 3 minutes.

  5. Remove from the oven, turn each piece over, and smear with some Parmesan paste to cover the top of the fish (easily done with a fork). Broil for another 4 to 5 minutes, until it’s bubbling and golden brown on the top and flaky in the middle.

 

This article was written by Serene Allison and Pearl Barrett from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Barbie’s New Robotics Engineer Doll is the Hero Our Girls Need

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She’s also releasing an e-book.

Since 1959, Barbie has held many different careers, from paratrooper and pet stylist to ballerina and surgeon, but this latest incarnation feels especially relevant nowadays—considering how quickly our technology is advancing.

Today, the brand behind the iconic doll launched Robotics Engineer Barbie as the official “Career of the Year” doll, in order to promote young girls’ interest in the STEM fields.

Currently, only 24 percent of STEM jobs are held by females, which is a shame considering there are so many talented young women out there who would totally slay in these fields.

Now, with the help of Barbie, that will hopefully soon change, and pique more girls’ interest in holding careers in science, tech, engineering or math.

In addition to releasing the doll, which will come in four different skin tones, and will retail for $14, the Barbie brand will also help teach girls how to code. As part of their multi-year partnership with game-based platform Tynker, they’ve launched six free Barbie-inspired coding lessons, available starting today on tynker.com/BarbieYCBA, that teach logic, problem-solving and the fundamentals of coding. They’ll also be introducing seven more lessons with Tynker throughout the year.

“For almost 60 years, Barbie has exposed girls to roles where women are underrepresented to show them that they can be anything,” said Lisa McKnight, General Manager and Senior Vice President, Barbie, in a press release. “By playing with Robotics Engineer Barbie on and offline, we are giving girls a new platform for play in their imaginary world and teaching them important skills for their real world.”

What’s more, the brand is giving a grant to Black Girls Code, a nonprofit that provides technology education for African-American girls, and gifting dolls to youngsters at their robotics workshops. Barbie will also be releasing the kid-friendly beginner coding e-book, Code Camp for Barbie and Friends, which will be available on Amazon. To create the book, the brand collaborated with Information Science Professor and coder Casey Fiesler, Ph.D.

They also released the video below, which has little girls mentioning the types of jobs where women are underrepresented.

Although Barbie is no stranger to the STEM fields, since she’s already been an astronaut, scientist, video game developer and computer engineer, it’s still refreshing to see the iconic doll in another job that many girls wouldn’t automatically associate with women. As the little girls in the video asked, “If girls can’t see women doing these jobs, how will we know we can?”

 

This article was written by Maricar Santos from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.