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Archive for the ‘Mathematics’ Category

This Mom’s Clever Hack May be the Perfect Way to Teach Your Kids About Money

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It’s never too early to learn about financial responsibility.

Working moms already do a great job in leading by example and teaching their kids about the value of hard work, but one mom took things a bit further by actually giving her daughter imaginary bills and checks to teach her some key financial lessons.

Lynn Brooks, a working mom of two from Birmingham, AL, posted her parenting hack on Facebook where it has since been shared more than 150,000 times. In the post, she says wanted to teach her child important life skills. “Not only is my daughter learning responsibilities, she’s also learning her math in the process,” she wrote.

Every week her daughter Londyn is given a paycheck for all of her “work,” such as going to school, and even gets a bonus for good grades. The official paycheck is of course signed off by Mom.

However, Londyn also has some “bills” she is responsible for paying. She is billed every week for using water, power and Internet. Lynn puts all of the money her daughter pays into a savings account for her.

Londyn’s mom even creates a work and payment schedule every week to help her keep track of everything.

The money that Londyn earns is kept at the “bank” for safekeeping. Londyn has to fill out withdrawal and deposit slips, which also double as extra math lessons.

She can even shop at a little store her mom set up, where treats can be purchased using the saved wages.

In her original post, Lynn encourages other parents to do something similar with their own kids—especially since they may not be receiving these types of lessons in school. “Schools are not teaching this much-needed aspect of life,” she wrote. “[There are] so many kids—even young adults and teens—that only know how to use a debit card. So parents, guardians, friends and family, by all means find your structure and create saving magic.”

Lynn also added that her daughter is definitely learning some serious financial responsibility because of it. “My daughter is confident, learning and is improving,” Lynn wrote. “It’s borderline bribery, however, we ALL feel great when we get rewarded and being acknowledged for doing a great job. Make this project your own. It’s fun.”

 

This article was written by Joseph Barberio from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

5 Easy Indoor Activities to Promote STEAM Skills in Your Kids

Simple ways to get your child thinking critically.

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Turning everyday tasks into learning opportunities with your children can greatly benefit them in the classroom. And STEAM education, which stands for science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics, is a great way to get your kids to brush up on their critical thinking skills. Here are five ways to incorporate STEAM (or STEM) into fun activities without having to set foot outside.

1. Make soup together.

Science: Through this activity, children will become early scientists as they compare and contrast how the texture of vegetables changes throughout the cooking process.

Technology: Ask: How does heat cook soup? How will you time the cooking? How do you keep veggies fresh before cooking? Have the kids think of the everyday uses of technology that help them and you make soup. In addition, have the children come up with different ways they might cook their soup if they didn’t have a stove.

Engineering: Using a knife can promote an early engineering experience of a simple machine, such as a wedge. The discussion alone around the process of cooking is a wonderful form of engaging engineering skills.

Art: Follow your soup-making process by reading a story! Our favorite is the story of Stone Soup by Marcia Brown. After storytime, invite children to draw a picture of their favorite part of making homemade soup.

Math: Through cutting vegetables, children may learn halves or fourths, exploring fractions or simply counting and measuring. Adding spices and measuring the vegetable stock also provide opportunities for children to begin to understand the properties of measurement.

Play with bath toys.

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Make bathtime educational.

Photo: Pixabay

Gather various water-safe objects that sink and float through exploring, observing and predicting.

Grab plastic measuring cups and spoons, plastic bowls and other water-safe items and toss ’em in the tub. Ask:

  • Why do some things float and some sink?
  • What do you notice about the shape, weight and feel of the objects when they’re in the water? How does that change when you take them out?

Bake together.

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The science of turning raw ingredients into something mouthwatering.

Photo: Pixabay

Make prepping a treat even sweeter with these tips and questions to incorporate into your kitchen adventures.

  • Talk through measurements as you mix dry ingredients together.
  • What do we predict will happen when dry ingredients are mixed in with the wet ingredients?
  • What makes the batter change color?
  • What do you think might happen when we bake the batter? What makes the batter go from wet to baked and delicious?

Ease into a bedtime routine with flashlight shadows.

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Nothing like old-school entertainment.

iStock

Grab your flashlight and small objects, like a favorite stuffed animal, toys, or even a shoe, and see how many different ways you can make shadows move and play across the room.

  • Place objects or your hand in front of the light and observe how shadows change and move around the room.
  • Create a story about the object’s shadow.
  • How do you make the shadows dance?
  • How can we make the object look bigger or smaller?
  • How many different ways can you make a shadow disappear and reappear in a different place?

Build a shadow theater.

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Bring the inner director out of your child.

Photo: iStock

Materials: Shoe boxes or pieces of cardboard, tape, white or waxed paper, flashlight, variety of objects to cast shadows

Cut off the top and bottom of the boxes. Help the children to tape paper across one of the openings. Ask: What else could we use to attach the paper? Place different objects in the box and light them from behind. Allow the children to select objects and have others guess what each object is while viewing from the other side. Encourage the children to experiment with moving the object and the light.

  • Can you make the object look bigger? Ask children to think of other ways to make a shadow theater.
  • What else could we use to let the light shine through? Do we need a frame?

Allison Wilson is the Director of Curriculum and Innovation at Stratford School, a leading independent private school founded on the belief that education is a significant influence in the life of a child. She is passionate about developing teachers and students, bringing more than 15 years of experience to the early-childhood sector through teaching, school leadership, teacher training and innovative curriculum development. Stratford offers an accelerated, balanced curriculum from preschool through eighth grade with an emphasis in the areas of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) that incorporates music, physical education, foreign language and social skills development.


 

This article was written by Allison Wilson from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

KuKu Game

KuKu (Koo – Koo) is a game that teaches risk, money and numbers, but it’s easy enough to explain to your child.

What you need

  • One large poster paper
  • One large drafting compass
  • A pencil
  • A deck of cards
  • Coins (pennies, nickels, dimes or quarters) or poker chips for each player

Set up

To set up your board, take the poster paper and draw a large circle close to the edge with your protractor. Next, draw a smaller circle inside and continue that process until you have about five concentric circles decreasing in size toward the middle. Then, draw lines coming from the center to the edge, resembling pizza slices (see below).

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Players

  • three to eight

Goal

  • To not end up with the lowest card

How to Play

  1. Choose a starting dealer. The deal will rotate clockwise with each round.
  2. Have each player put a coin on the red dot at the bottom of the poster.
  3. The dealer distributes one card per player face down.
  4. Starting to the left of the dealer, the player decides to keep the dealt card or to switch it with the person on the left. If switched, the second player can either keep it or switch it again with the player on the left. Remember, the object is to not end up with the lowest card of all players.
  5. This play continues until it circles back to the dealer. The dealer can either keep the card he has or switch it with a card in the deck.
  6. All players turn their card face up. The person with the lowest card moves up one space on the board.
  7. Start a new round with a new dealer.
  8. Once your coin is in the innermost circle, you are out.
  9. The last person left with a coin outside the inner circle wins all the coins.

** If you are dealt a king at any time, you can yell “KuKu” and refuse to give your card to the person asking to switch with you.

Have fun!

 

Learning about Money

At the Goddard SchoolThe Goddard School, we begin teaching children about money in preschool. In our dramatic play areas, children pretend they are going to the store, handling money in a restaurant or saving money in a bank. We also introduce coins and place values in the preschool and pre-kindergarten classrooms. Children learn about using money while listening to stories and when taking part in math games and activities. Giving children a head start with money skills is crucial.

You can also start teaching your children about money and value at home with these easy ideas.

  • Create a wish jar or piggy bank. If your children want a toy, have them learn to save for it. They can use money they “earn” from chores, money from the tooth fairy and gifts. Count the money with your children each time they add to their wish jars;
  • Use the grocery store as a classroom. Children can learn about the cost of items, measurement, sizes and more.
  • Be careful when discussing money at home. Children may hear those tough conversations about bills, and they can pick up on the stress that may accompany them;
  • Teach the graciousness of giving. Have your children put aside some of their wish jar money to help others in need;
  • Ask the children’s grandparents to help. Instead of buying their grandchildren lots of toys, ask them to provide some funds for the wish jar;
  • When your child is in school, take a trip to the bank and have your child set up a savings account.

Learning about money and money management early in life will help your child be more responsible in the future.

What Is STEM?

 

The Goddard SchoolSTEM is the acronym for the subjects science, technology, engineering and math. According to Dr. Sherri Killins at the Boston Children’s Museum, “What STEM does is give a label to what you (parents and educators) are already doing… helping children to explore, observe, ask questions, predict, integrate their learning.”

At The Goddard School®, we encourage children to use their inquisitive natures to explore, build and question. Through hands-on activities, children learn to ask questions, draw upon their existing knowledge, design experiments, make predictions about what might happen and draw conclusions, which is the scientific process. Lessons and play use math and technology every day. Children are natural engineers, and we encourage their creativity in our block, art and outside play areas.  

“There are no greater natural scientists and engineers then young children. Inquisitive learners who learn STEM concepts through play. Once again, it comes down to letting the children play!” – J. D. Chesloff, 2012, Chair of the Board of Education and Care, State of Massachusetts