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Archive for the ‘Mathematics’ Category

KuKu Game

KuKu (Koo – Koo) is a game that teaches risk, money and numbers, but it’s easy enough to explain to your child.

What you need

  • One large poster paper
  • One large drafting compass
  • A pencil
  • A deck of cards
  • Coins (pennies, nickels, dimes or quarters) or poker chips for each player

Set up

To set up your board, take the poster paper and draw a large circle close to the edge with your protractor. Next, draw a smaller circle inside and continue that process until you have about five concentric circles decreasing in size toward the middle. Then, draw lines coming from the center to the edge, resembling pizza slices (see below).



  • three to eight


  • To not end up with the lowest card

How to Play

  1. Choose a starting dealer. The deal will rotate clockwise with each round.
  2. Have each player put a coin on the red dot at the bottom of the poster.
  3. The dealer distributes one card per player face down.
  4. Starting to the left of the dealer, the player decides to keep the dealt card or to switch it with the person on the left. If switched, the second player can either keep it or switch it again with the player on the left. Remember, the object is to not end up with the lowest card of all players.
  5. This play continues until it circles back to the dealer. The dealer can either keep the card he has or switch it with a card in the deck.
  6. All players turn their card face up. The person with the lowest card moves up one space on the board.
  7. Start a new round with a new dealer.
  8. Once your coin is in the innermost circle, you are out.
  9. The last person left with a coin outside the inner circle wins all the coins.

** If you are dealt a king at any time, you can yell “KuKu” and refuse to give your card to the person asking to switch with you.

Have fun!


Learning about Money

At the Goddard SchoolThe Goddard School, we begin teaching children about money in preschool. In our dramatic play areas, children pretend they are going to the store, handling money in a restaurant or saving money in a bank. We also introduce coins and place values in the preschool and pre-kindergarten classrooms. Children learn about using money while listening to stories and when taking part in math games and activities. Giving children a head start with money skills is crucial.

You can also start teaching your children about money and value at home with these easy ideas.

  • Create a wish jar or piggy bank. If your children want a toy, have them learn to save for it. They can use money they “earn” from chores, money from the tooth fairy and gifts. Count the money with your children each time they add to their wish jars;
  • Use the grocery store as a classroom. Children can learn about the cost of items, measurement, sizes and more.
  • Be careful when discussing money at home. Children may hear those tough conversations about bills, and they can pick up on the stress that may accompany them;
  • Teach the graciousness of giving. Have your children put aside some of their wish jar money to help others in need;
  • Ask the children’s grandparents to help. Instead of buying their grandchildren lots of toys, ask them to provide some funds for the wish jar;
  • When your child is in school, take a trip to the bank and have your child set up a savings account.

Learning about money and money management early in life will help your child be more responsible in the future.

What Is STEM?


The Goddard SchoolSTEM is the acronym for the subjects science, technology, engineering and math. According to Dr. Sherri Killins at the Boston Children’s Museum, “What STEM does is give a label to what you (parents and educators) are already doing… helping children to explore, observe, ask questions, predict, integrate their learning.”

At The Goddard School®, we encourage children to use their inquisitive natures to explore, build and question. Through hands-on activities, children learn to ask questions, draw upon their existing knowledge, design experiments, make predictions about what might happen and draw conclusions, which is the scientific process. Lessons and play use math and technology every day. Children are natural engineers, and we encourage their creativity in our block, art and outside play areas.  

“There are no greater natural scientists and engineers then young children. Inquisitive learners who learn STEM concepts through play. Once again, it comes down to letting the children play!” – J. D. Chesloff, 2012, Chair of the Board of Education and Care, State of Massachusetts