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Archive for the ‘Nutrition, Parents, Preschool’ Category

How to Overcome Your Child’s Picky Eating Habits

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You were a picky eater when you were a child. Now your own child is, shall we say, highly discriminating on what he or she eats, too. Coincidence? A recent study says maybe not.

The study, by researchers from the University of Illinois, gathered information from the parents of 153 preschoolers. They found that while many factors can play a role in a child’s choosy eating, genes that are linked to a child’s sensory responses could be one of them.

What does this mean if you’re the parent of a picky eater? Do you simply throw up your hands and say it’s genetic?

Keep trying

Don’t give up on efforts to entice your child to eat a broader range of food, says Jennifer Hyland, RD, CSP, LD of Cleveland Clinic Children’s. It’s important to continue to expose children to new foods over time to get them to try them, she says.

There is a wide spectrum of behavior when it comes to picky eating, Ms. Hyland says. But for most children, picky eating does not go away on its own unless parents really work at it.

Research has shown it can take anywhere from 10 to 20 tries for a child to like a particular food, she says.

But you don’t want to force foods upon your child. Keep meals an enjoyable experience, Ms. Hyland says. One strategy is for parents to ask their children to take no-thank-you bites – which means they can say, “no thank you,” but they have to at least try the food. This leads to continued exposure, and over time, it’s hoped they will learn to develop a taste for these foods.

At meal time, Ms. Hyland says, it’s helpful to have at least one food on the plate that you know your child will eat. Also, but be sure to give everyone at the table the same foods.

“Try your best to cook the same meal for the whole family,” she says. “The child may not eat all of it, but it’s important that you encourage them to at least try, and that you set an example of trying these foods yourself, so that over time, they will learn to eat these foods.”

It begins during toddlerhood

It’s typical for picky eating to start during the toddler years, Ms. Hyland says.

“Normal picky-eating can start anywhere as early as age 2 or 3,” she says. “Usually during infancy, children are adventurous eaters and they’re trying new things. The picky eating really creeps up around the time they become toddlers. Parents will say, ‘My kid ate vegetables and they liked this and they liked that and now they don’t eat anything.’ We see that pretty frequently.” 

Should parents worry about a picky eater? If your child is underweight, you might be worried that your child isn’t getting enough nutrition. This results in parents giving their children whatever they want to eat to make sure they’re getting enough calories.

If this is you, it’s a  good time to meet with a registered dietitian or physician, because there are ways to combat that problem, while still improving the picky eating habits, Ms. Hyland says.

The most important thing a parent can do with a choosy eater is be consistent and not give up, Ms. Hyland says.

However, if a child has chewing or swallowing issues, or shows severe anxiety about trying new foods,  talk to a doctor, because you child may need the help of a behavioral specialist or multidisciplinary feeding program.

Complete results of the study can be found in the Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics.

 

 

This article was written by Children’s Health Team from Cleveland Clinic and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Five Benefits of Teaching Children to Cook

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Cooking is as important a life skill as swimming or riding a bike; however, like those other skills, cooking is not generally taught in school. Parents are usually responsible for teaching their children to cook. Here are five benefits of teaching children this valuable skill.

  1. It’s a great bonding experience. If you teach your child how to make a favorite family recipe, she will have a memory that can last a lifetime.
  2. It leads to healthy eating habits. By purchasing fresh, healthy ingredients and using them to prepare a meal at home with your child, you will give him a better understanding of what healthy eating looks and tastes like.
  3. It helps build math skills. Cooking involves math, such as measuring out a cup of milk, counting eggs or doubling a recipe. Using math practically in the kitchen helps bolster those skills.
  4. It helps boost confidence. If you serve spaghetti and meatballs and announce to the rest of your family that your child helped prepare the meal, it may give him a sense of accomplishment, which will increase his self-esteem.
  5. It encourages the development of communication and collaboration skills. If you and your child are baking a cake, you have to talk about what you are doing, such as measuring flour or stirring batter. You must also work together to assemble the cake.

Learning through Meal Prepping: Five Benefits of Encouraging Children to Pack Their Own Lunches

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Letting children assist with packing their own lunches can be beneficial. You can teach your children about responsibility and portion control and boost their creativity and decision-making skills by inviting your children into the kitchen with you for a lesson. Here are five benefits of allowing children to help prepare their own lunches.

It emphasizes portion control. Bento-box lunch containers are an easy and exceptionally helpful tool for teaching your child about portion sizes and meal organization. When your children select their lunch items with you, provide them with a bento-box container and explain what healthy meal portions look like. They can use the bento box to pack their lunches, which helps them visualize and be aware of the portion sizes they are packing.

It introduces the importance of nutrition. Your children’s favorite go-to treats, such as fruit snacks and cookies, don’t necessarily make some of the healthiest snacks. When they’re in the kitchen with you, teach them about what the key food groups are and how those food groups keep their minds and bodies well nourished. Provide different vegetables, fruits, proteins, grains and dairy products, and let them choose what to put into their lunch bags. Guide them to pack meals with all the food groups.

It aids in independent learning and decision making. When your children are preparing their lunches with you in the kitchen, give them options for what to pack. Allow them to choose from two or three different things. Do they want a chicken sandwich, a turkey sandwich or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich? Do they want carrots or cucumbers? Do they want strawberries, apples or grapes? Once they decide, let them gather and pack their choices, and then help them focus on the next food group. Once you establish a routine, they will make quicker decisions. Picking their own meals lets them feel independent and accomplished.

It boosts creativity and introduces the art of cooking.
Getting your children into the kitchen at a young age helps them start cooking and learning the steps it takes to create a meal. Instead of providing them with premade and wrapped turkey sandwiches, let them make some with you. Start by letting them select the bread, get out the condiments and select the meat, cheese and toppings they want on their delicious sandwiches. This shows them how much time, effort, creativity and skill it takes to make a proper lunch.

It teaches responsibility, routines and time management. Whether you pack meals after dinner or after your children get home from school, make sure to schedule a meal-preparation time that works best for your family. Meet in the kitchen at your designated time, and start preparing the lunches. By establishing a routine, such as meeting every night or twice a week at 7 PM, you will be familiarizing your children with following a schedule, helping them plan meals. If you want to make meal preparation more fun, consider getting a small chalkboard or whiteboard to keep in your kitchen. Have your children write out the days of the week and the foods they want in their lunchboxes each day. This can keep you organized, and it encourages your children to start planning meals.

Bento Box Mania!

What is a bento box?

Bento box lunches have been increasing in popularity among families with preschoolers and school-age children. Google the term “bento box lunch” and you will find a wealth of resources, including blogs, Pinterest pages and online retailers selling basic and whimsical options. If a parent is artistic, the child’s lunch can become a work of art.

Why does it work well for school lunches?

Bento boxes work well for school lunches and snacks because they protect food in a sealed container and keep food groups separate. If you have a picky eater who does not like foods touching, a bento box may keep your child happy. Parents can have fun creating different lunchtime masterpieces. Bento boxes are also economical because they are reusable and help keep plastic snack and sandwich bags out of landfills.

What are the nutritional benefits of bento boxes?

Bento boxes are appealing because they provide a creative way to add a variety of foods to a child’s lunch while keeping wet foods separate from dry foods. By introducing different, healthy foods early in your child’s life, he or she may develop a preference for those foods as well as a more diverse palate. You can also turn the preparation of the bento box into a learning activity by asking your child what each food is, where it comes from, how it’s made and so on. Engaging your child in the experience may help to build and reinforce a child’s love of diverse, nutritious foods while fostering a love of learning.

What can I put in my child’s bento box?

The options are endless, but here are some ideas:

  • Sliced hard-boiled eggs;
  • A mini-bagel sandwich with almond butter, jelly or another spread;
  • Sliced strawberries, blueberries and kiwis;
  • Cheese cubes;
  • Pretzels;
  • Sliced grapes;
  • A muffin;
  • Mini-pita sandwiches filled with cheese and pepperoni;
  • Sliced pineapple;
  • Celery and carrot sticks;
  • Cucumber slices;
  • A turkey and cheese sandwich on a Hawaiian roll;
  • Veggie chips;
  • Rice molds;
  • Chickpeas and black beans;
  • Raisins and chocolate chips;
  • Sandwich rounds with ham, cheese and avocado.

Enjoy making bento box lunches!

5 Easy and Delicious One-Pan Meals

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It’s easy to get lazy on weeknights, especially when the mere thought of cooking an entire dinner is exhausting. That’s where these five one-pan meals come in. Just assemble all of the ingredients on a single baking sheet and pop it in the oven. Because a no fuss, no mess dinner is exactly what you need right now.

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Sausage with Broccoli Rabe and White Beans

An instant dinner with almost no cleanup.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

One-Pan Roasted Salmon with Potatoes and Romaine

The least intimidating way to cook seafood at home.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

One-Pan Eggs with Asparagus and Tomatoes

Serve it for breakfast or dinner.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

One-Pan Roasted Chicken with Carrots

Cook it all at once on a sheet pan, then kick back and enjoy dinner (without a pile of pots and pans in the sink).

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

One-Pan Steak with Beets and Crispy Kale

A proper meat-and-potatoes dinner, minus the fuss.

Get the recipe

 

This article was from PureWow and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

13 Healthy Halloween Snacks That Won’t Scare Kids Away

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If you’re anything like us, then you know what it’s like to spend Halloween trying your hardest not to consume the entire candy stash before the first kid knocks on your door.

But if you can’t trust yourself sitting beside that Costco-size box of chocolate bars all night (who can?!), consider stocking up on these 13 healthier Halloween snacks. They offer kiddos more balanced options but also won’t make you feel like crap if you can’t stop at just one.

This list is 100-percent dietitian-approved: Some are allergen-friendly, vegan, or gluten-free; others are organic, non-GMO, and void of artificial colors or flavors. And a bunch of them pack a wide range of lower-sugar, antioxidant-rich ingredients. So whatever your Halloween vice, whether it’s sweet, salty, or something in-between, we’ve got a healthier Halloween treat for you. Oh, and the kids.

 

1. YumEarth Organic Pomegranate Licorice

A common source of food sensitivities, red food coloring isn’t usually a fan favorite among parents of candy-loving kids. Thankfully, these little licorice nibs are flavored with organic pomegranate and cherry juice and colored naturally with organic fruit concentrates, yielding a gluten-free, vegan, and nut-free treat.

($19 for 6 bags; amazon.com)

 

2. MadeGood Halloween Chocolate Granola Minis

Halloween can be a nightmare for a kid with severe food allergies, so we love these limited-edition chocolate chip granola minis from MadeGood. Free of the top eight allergens, organic, gluten-free, and non-GMO project verified, these bars are a breath of fresh air for concerned parents. They’re also a charitable choice this Halloween since 2 percent of all proceeds from the bars goes directly to Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals.

($19 for 36 minis; amazon.com)

 

3. Veggie Go’s Organic Fruit and Veggie Strips

Packed with a half-cup of organic fruit and veggies per strip, plus fiber-rich flaxseeds and a touch of cinnamon, these no-sugar-added snacks are a smart way to get your sweet fix on October 31. They’re also gluten-free, vegan, non-GMO, and have less than 20 calories per bar (not that we are counting, but that’s pretty good).

($23 for 20 strips; amazon.com)

 

4. Free2b Dark Chocolate Mint Cups

Ready to trade that classic (massive) Peppermint Patty for something a little lighter? We love these vegan dark chocolate mint cups because they’re free of the top 12 allergens (nuts, dairy, gluten, oh my!) and are made with fair-trade unsweetened dark chocolate so we can feel good about where they came from.

($32 for 24; amazon.com)

 

5. Annie’s Organic Orchard Cherry Apple Fruit Bites

With organic fruit pureé as the first ingredient and no artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives, moms and dads won’t mind popping these fruity bites into kiddo’s lunch for a healthier post-Halloween snack.

($5 for 5 packs; walmart.com)

 

6. KIND Minis

With just 2 grams of added sugars per 100-calorie bar, along with 3 grams each of fiber and protein, you can feel good about these KIND minis making an appearance in your kids’ stash. Sweet, salty, chocolaty, and crunchy, they check all the boxes for a healthier Halloween treat.

($22 for 20 bars; amazon.com)

 

7. The Good Bean Sea Salt Crunchy Chickpeas

Need a savory option for the chip fans in your life? We got you. These single-serve bags of addictive crispy chickpeas pack 4 grams of protein and fiber into every 90-calorie pack, making them an awesome choice for your kids (and you, of course).

($30 for 50 packs; amazon.com)

 

8. Unreal Dark Chocolate Crispy Quinoa Gems

Getting your chocolate fix doesn’t have to mean tossing junk food into your grocery cart just before checkout. These tasty chocolate rounds are made with organic, non-GMO, fair-trade dark chocolate and are vegan and gluten-free. They’re also colored naturally with fruit and veggie extract instead of the standard food dyes and offer a delicate crunch from protein-rich quinoa.

($26 for 6 bags; shop.getunreal.com)

 

9. Justin’s Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups

Neighborhood mamas and dads are going to be pumped when they find these in their kids’ candy bag. The better-for-you cups are made with organic dark chocolate and organic peanuts and offer 4 grams of protein per two-cup package. Sorry, kids, we might have to confiscate your bag for these.

($25 for 12 packs; amazon.com)

 

12. Skinny Dipped Almonds

Finally, a Halloween option that could make its way into the holiday season too (seriously, these are great stocking stuffers). The dark chocolate-dipped almonds have just 60 calories per pack and only 2 grams of sugar. The almonds are coated in an antioxidant-rich dark chocolate for a healthy treat that will give Almond Joys a run for their money.

($35 for 24 packs; skinnydipped.com)

 

13. Fruits in Chocolate Dark Chocolate Covered Coconut

Each individually wrapped truffle features a whole dried fruit coated in rich dark chocolate with just 50 to 70 calories per piece. They’re available as a mixed box with prunes, cranberries, and apricots, so you can give ’em to the kids who could use a more natural chocolate fix this fall (so, all of them).

($23 for 46 pieces; fruitsinchocolate.com)

Every editorial product is independently selected by our editors. If you buy something through one of our links, we may earn a commission. But don’t worry, it doesn’t cost you anything extra, and we wouldn’t recommend a product if we didn’t love it as much as we love puppies.

 

This article was written by Abbey Sharp from Greatist and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

6 Back-to-School Tips from Moms Who Are Total Pros

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Even though this article was originally written with working mothers in mind, this is great information for all parents!

It’s back-to-school time, which means gearing up for those early starts, packed lunches and the mad rush to catch the bus. But the goods news is that you can make the transition so much easier (for kids and parents) with these genius tips that we gleaned from some of the coolest moms we know.

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Element 1

Pinterest Is Your Friend

“I pack my son’s lunch every day, but I run out of ideas a week or so into the school year—and he gets bored of the same old, same old. To make matters worse, he’s also very picky, and I never really know what he’s going to like. So right before the school year, I like to make a Pinterest board with tons of different lunch ideas. Then I go to the computer with him every few weeks and have him pick out the ones he’s drawn to. This way, he’s more into the lunch because he was involved with the planning—and it helps me out because I don’t have to rack my brain trying to think of something he’ll actually eat!” – Alyssa Hertzig, beauty editor and blogger

Give Kids Some Options

“Getting the kids dressed can be quite a challenge and the fastest way to run late! To avoid this, each morning (or night before), select three different outfits for them to choose from to wear. My girls love picking out their clothes and it makes them feel like they have some control but still gives me the ability to carefully decide which three outfits, while saving time. Win-win!” – Nicole DiGiacobbe, lifestyle blogger

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Element 2

Lay Out Clear Steps

“My top tip for getting kids out the door on time? Create or purchase a customizable chart—something simple that tells kiddos what to do in the morning by using easy-to-complete steps like ‘brush hair,’ ‘get dressed,’ ‘eat breakfast,’ and ‘brush teeth.’ It’s so simple but such a life-saver.” – Kendall Rayburn, lifestyle and family blogger

Ask Specific Questions

“As a mom, I am always dying to know what my kids did during the school day. And it’s always so frustrating when they come home and say the day was ‘fine’ or that they don’t remember what they did. So, I’ve learned that it’s best to ask very specific questions or to give them prompts like, ‘tell me about something funny that happened today’ or ‘what was the most surprising thing you learned today?’ These questions essentially force them to give you an answer—and you’ll end up learning a ton about what they’re actually doing during the day!” – Alyssa Hertzig

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Element 3

Don’t Just Prep Their Lunches

“To avoid the craziness in the morning, I like to meal prep as much of my kids’ breakfast as I can. For example: My kids love to have bacon every morning, but it can take a lot of time to fry it up every day. (Plus, it’s messy!) So, on Sundays, I lay out a whole package of it on a sheet pan covered in oil. Then I bake it in the oven. I keep the cooked bacon in the fridge, and just take out a few slices each morning, pop them in the microwave for a few seconds, and breakfast is ready in no time.” – Alyssa Hertzig

Pick Your Battles

“If they don’t want to eat carrots for lunch, switch it up and give them a treat instead. Something in their belly is better than nothing. Of course, this doesn’t apply to every single day but sometimes it’s easier to be the fun mom that packed her kids some cheddar bunnies!” – Nicole DiGiacobbe

 

This article was from PureWow and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

The Healthiest Kid’s Meals at Fast Food Chains

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McDonald’s announced they’re removing cheeseburgers and chocolate milk from their Happy Meals. They’re just the latest fast food restaurant offering surprisingly healthy options: Here’s what to order.

Though many of us grew up happily eating, uh, Happy Meals, the rise in childhood obesity has caused parents to rethink stopping through the drive-through to pick up a kid’s meal from McDonalds on the way home. Though fast food restaurants have spent the better half of the last decade pushing healthier choices in hopes that families will decide to come back as regular customers, applesauce and low-fat milk haven’t really enticed mom and dad. But that all might change as McDonald’s announced today that strict Happy Meal changes would be coming this summer. How many calories will be in a Happy Meal come June? Fewer than 600. All kids meals will also contain only 650 milligrams of salt. Other big changes include less-sugary chocolate milk, slimmer kids fries, and no cheeseburgers.
But though McDonald’s changing Happy Meals might be today’s news, they’re not the only fast food restaurants with surprisingly healthy kids meals. In light of the big changes at McDonald’s, we researched the healthiest kid options now on the menu at every top chain. Here, what you should order the kids when the fast food counter is your best option to eat:

Healthiest Kid’s Meal at Subway

In a 2016 The Daily Meal ranking of all the fast food kid’s meals on the market, Subway took the top spot with the overall healthiest meal: a Veggie Delite sandwich with a side of apples and low-fat milk. Though the veggie-based sandwich is the most healthful option, the turkey breast sandwich is also a good option for those looking to add protein.

Healthiest Kid’s Meal at Burger King

CNN reports that a Chicken Nuggets King Jr. meal (4 pieces) with ketchup, applesauce, and fat-free milk offers the lowest option in calories, saturated fat, and sugar.

Healthiest Kid’s Meal at Wendy’s

With 20 grams of protein, 10 grams of fat, and only 270 calories, the Grilled Chicken Wrap is the healthiest entrée on Wendy’s kids’ menu. Pair it with apple slices and a bottle of water, and your child will be eating a pretty well-rounded meal that just happens to be fast food. Just try to say no to a Frosty (and if you can’t, just make sure it’s a junior!)

Healthiest Kid’s Meal at Dairy Queen

According to a 2013 study from the University of Connecticut’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, Dairy Queen had the fewest amount of options for healthy kids meals that meet expert recommendations for elementary school students. However, they’ve since cleaned up their act with a kids Livewell option (which meets nutrition standards as set by the National Restaurant Association) that features a kid’s grilled chicken wrap, a banana, and a bottle of water.

Healthiest Meal at Taco Bell

After ditching kids’ meals entirely in 2013, parents have had to decipher the regular menu for healthy options for their little ones. According to a 2018 article by Shape, nutritionists recommend ordering off the “power menu,” for high-protein options—just make sure you skip the rice. A mini quesadilla with chicken or beef aren’t too bad, either, if the kids are being picky.

 

This article was written by Liz Steelman from Real Simple and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

4 Science-Backed Benefits of Eating Dinner as a Family

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Whether you’re munching on organic grain bowls or ketchup-drenched, defrosted, dinosaur-shaped nuggets, sharing a screen-free family dinner nourishes kids in life-changing ways. And wash away your guilt, working parents: If you can’t get home for mac and cheese at 5:30 p.m., don’t sweat it. Aiming to eat together at least three times a week—including breakfast and weekend brunch—is a worthy goal. When it comes to raising healthy kids, body and soul, prioritizing frequent family meals counts most.

It lowers the risk of substance abuse 
Family dinners not only lower the risk of depression in kids, they also guard against the impulse to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. That’s because key communication takes place at these end-of-day parent-child debriefs. According to Columbia University’s National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, “Compared to teens who have frequent family dinners (5 to 7 per week), those who have infrequent family dinners (fewer than 3 per week) are more than twice as likely to say that they expect to try drugs in the future.” Teens who seldom eat with their parents are almost twice as likely to have used alcohol, and 1.5 times likelier to have used marijuana. “The magic that happens over family dinners isn’t the food on the table, but the communication and conversations around it,” explains the center’s marketing director Kathleen Ferrigno. “Of course there is no iron-clad guarantee that your kids will grow up drug-free, but knowledge is power, and the more you know, the better the odds are that you will raise a healthy kid.”

It leads to better academic performance
Writes Harvard Medical School psychology professor and author of Home for Dinner Anne Fishel: “Researchers found that for young children, dinnertime conversation boosts vocabulary even more than being read aloud to…Young kids learned 1,000 rare words at the dinner table, compared to only 143 from parents reading storybooks aloud. Kids who have a large vocabulary read earlier and more easily.” And as kids grow up, the intellectual benefits explode. “For school-age youngsters, regular mealtime is an even more powerful predictor of high achievement scores than time spent in school, doing homework, playing sports or doing art.”

It decreases obesity and eating disorders
Family dinners provide opportunities for parents to model—and regulate for their kids—healthy eating habits. According to a study led by eating disorder expert Dr. Jess Haines, “Compared to those who ate family dinner ‘never or some days,’ female adolescents who ate family dinner at least most days were less likely to initiate purging, binge eating, and frequent dieting.” An unrelated study conducted by University of Minnesota Family Social Science professor Dr. William J. Doherty found Americans (parents and kids) are significantly less overweight if they share family meals more frequently, and have fewer distractions at the table (like tech). Kids who eat dinner with their families often also eat healthier (more fruits and vegetables; less soda and fried foods), according to a study by Harvard Medical School’s Obesity Prevention Program. Family meals allow for both “discussions of nutrition [and] provision of healthful foods,” that study’s director, Dr. Matthew W. Gillman, told CNN.

It increases self-esteem and resilience
According to psychology researchers at Emory University, children who have frequent family dinners “know more about their family history and tend to have higher self-esteem, interact better with their peers and show higher resilience in the face of adversity.” When families who are close don’t sugarcoat life’s hardships (like the death of a relative or pet) their children exhibit “higher self-esteem and sense of control.” The communal table is where the stories of who we are, and who we come from, get passed down. According to Marshall Duke, a co-director of the study, which analyzed 120 hours of recorded family dinner conversations, “As the family talks about things, I think they are teaching the kids about assessment, about appraisal. How bad is this? How good is this? Resilience is nurtured when the child understands that negative events don’t define the family history.” 

 

This article was from PureWow and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Ice Cream Grahamwich!

Make summer last longer with these simple and delicious “ice cream” grahamwiches!

Ingredients

  • Graham Crackers
  • Whipped Topping
  • Plastic Wrap

1.  Spread a dollop of whipped topping on a graham cracker.

2.  Top with another graham cracker.

3.  Wrap each grahamwich in plastic wrap and freeze it.

4.  When it is completely frozen, unwrap and enjoy your ice cream grahamwich!