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Archive for the ‘Nutrition’ Category

Our Little Ones and Sugar

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By Jack Maypole, Contributing Writer and Goddard School Educational Advisory Board Member

As a pediatrician, we talk a great deal about childrenfood and children’s growth. For the vast majority of children, this is a topic easily broached by asking what their favorite foods are (pizza and tacos reign supreme) and what they like to drink (many say water, actually, and only a few admit they guzzle juice or soda). It is a fun way to start a conversation on a very broad and potentially complicated topic.  

After more than a couple of decades in practice, I get it. Food is love. Food is culture. Food is fun. Food is delicious. As North Americans, our love of food comes with a rather demanding sweet tooth. Along with this inclination comes parents who are rightfully concerned about their children’s sugar intake.  

I want to assure you, however, that many times the concern isn’t necessary – parents are well informed and smart about offering children nutritious foods. However, the lure of sugar is strong in children, and sometimes it’s hard to say no to those precious, pleading faces. While limiting sugar may seem daunting at times because it’s in just about everything, there are two takeaway messages we should remember: 

  1. Children are not destined to turn into cupcakes or refuse to eat anything but tablespoons of sugarno matter what Mary Poppins says. Has anyone verified her medical license?  
  2. We can help children develop healthy habits and reduce the amount of sugar in their dietscreate sugar hacks, if you will  when considering a tasty snack, confection, fine beverage or dessert.   

(Sort of a chew on this, eschew that, right?) 

I’ll channel a chat I have with parents who are concerned about their child’s weight. Ideally, we’ve been having this conversation all the way along: limiting sweet snacks as you are able and encouraging a balanced diet. It sounds easy, but if you ever walk into a supermarket, there are a lot of options competing for (and winning over) children’s taste buds. It is our role as grownups to push back on the siren calls of cupcakes and Sour Patch Kids and to set some limit, somewhere.  

I am not one to say never: never dessert, never candy, never soda. Absolute vows tend to fail absolutely. I am more about saying *sometimes* for sugary foods and drinks versus not allowing them at all. Should one eat ice cream for every meal? No, that is absurd, and children get it. Should one have more than a cup of soda or juice a day? The answer here is no, but it may require some explanation. Having juice or soda sometimes, but not all the time, can be okayas long as a child eats balanced meals overall for the day. 

So, if you are setting up a menu for a few days, how could you swap in some healthy alternatives instead of having frosted sugar bombs for dinner?  

Here are a few ideas:  

Hot days will continue well into September, so it may be handy to have a cool and smart alternative to sugary popsicles. Aren’t 100% juice popsicles better than the alternative because they’re natural? Great try, marketers, but no. Many products have additional sweeteners. One might do better to blend some fresh fruit (mixed berries, say, or mango or peach) and put the mixture in an ice cube tray. Delish.    

Is the snack cabinet full of cookies and tasty, carb-loaded sugary items? The best approach to this category is to limit how much fun food you purchase. If you don’t have it in stock, then they can’t senselessly nosh on it. Instead, put a bowl of fresh fruit that is in season on the kitchen table as appropriate for your children’s ages, including bananasapples, peaches or a small pile of washed berries.  

I might go one step further and help your preschoolers work with a peeler to learn how to peel an apple. Can they peel the whole skin in one go? Probably not, but trying can be a fun challenge. Just be sure to limit their attempts to one bit of fruit at a time so you don’t walk into the kitchen to see a pile of naked fruit. A grownup can slice the fruit into appropriate pieces for rapid consumption. 

Beverages are an area where there is some latitude. I advise parents to avoid buying juice or soda altogether if it is too much of a temptation. (If you do buy OJ, for example, be sure to buy the variety with calcium and vitamin D supplements.) For children over two years old, 2% milk is fine, within reason. For you fans out there, chocolate milk is a SUGARY drink, best considered almost like a soda for all the glucose it has in there. Drinking two or three cups of cow’s milk a day is ideal for growing, but many children take far less than that, taking water instead, I find. Flavored seltzer can be a great option instead of sugary sodas. Sugarfree juices like Crystal Lite and diet sodas are a bit controversial (the longterm effects of the artificial sweeteners remain an area of concern) but may be a reasonable concession for some families. 

Then, there is dessert. “Should we let children eat dessert? I get asked. Yes, in moderation in terms of amount and frequency. For example, if you have a dessert after dinner of blueberries in a bowl of milk, then no problem. If a child has a hankering for a bowl of ice cream and hot fudge every day, I’d think that through, in terms of how that fits with a child’s or family’s profile. For most children, though, having an occasional bowl or cone of ice cream or some other sugary fare is not an issue.  

I will say that I’d encourage children to eat a reasonable portion of their dinner BEFORE they tuck into a sweet aftermeal snack. Some children get overly clever at this sort of meal replacement and push away their plate and eat a double helping of the afterdinner treat 

Bookstores, cookbooks, family filing cabinets and the internet (such as ChopChopFamily.org – Recipes) are full of ideas for balanced meals and less sugary options for our children. I think we all will be more successful if we think holistically about how our children eat across the days and the weeks. Are they eating a balance of protein, fat and some carbs? Are we offering them, to the extent possible, fresh foods and options that are lessoften sweetened or enriched with corn syrup? Once we have an idea of what we want to offer them, it is important to look at one’s cabinets (or secret candy stashes from last Halloween) and understand where all of their calories are coming from. 

Work with your children to understand their favorite foods, and work with them on a Sunday evening to build a menu for the week using their input for some of the entries (let the children take turns choosing a topfive food for dinner one night each week) and build on their choices and preferences. Fried chicken is okay. Fried Oreos may not be.  

With this in mind, we can get back to the basics that make eating together an occasion of love, culture, togetherness and joy, without the sugar high to follow if you are lucky!  

Bon appétit.  

 

Seven Ways to Help Your Children Develop a Positive Relationship with Food

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Candy is junk food. It’s not good for you.  

You need to eat your broccoli. It’s so healthy! 

You can have dessert after you finish your dinner 

Do any of these statements sound familiar? I’ve heard them throughout my life, so I have always labeled foods as good or bad, healthy or unhealthy and nutritious or junkWe are all trained to believe that foods can only be one or the other 

I never thought about the effects of labeling food until I became a mom. When my son started eating solid foods, I furiously searched for articles by nutrition experts who could tell me exactly what I needed to do to ensure he developed a healthy relationship with food. My own food insecurities took over my brain, and all I could think was, Will my sweet tooth be passed down to him so he’ll gorge himself on cupcakes all day? That wouldn’t happen on my watch! My goal was to raise a vegetable-loving, fresh-foodeating son.  

Did I achieve this goal? Well, no. Is my fridge filled with dinosaur nuggets and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches? Maybe. Have I given up? No. I’m proud to say that my son loves carrots.  

Is that the only vegetable he eats right now? Yes.  

I’m only human, and I’ve made some mistakes on my journey toward helping my son cultivate a healthy relationship with food. I’d like to share some of the insightful tips that have helped me reevaluate harmful attitudes toward food that I’ve learned. 

Do Not Label Foods as Good or BadThe first and most important step is to make a conscious decision to stop calling foods goodbadhealthy or unhealthywhich is something discussed in a previous article about how to handle sweets at home. Pediatric nutritionist Jill Castle recommends using the words nourishing or fun 

In an article on her website, Castle shares a real-life example of the harm that labeling foods may cause. She discusses a client who was frustrated that her daughter didn’t make healthier choices. The client would ask her daughter, Are you sure you want that?” and “Couldn’t you choose something healthier?” Her daughter did try to make good choices, but she felt deep shame about enjoying her “bad” choices, too. 

“Ultimately, [the daughter] became conflicted about food, which started to eat away at her self-esteem. She didn’t feel good about herself (or the foods she enjoyed eating) and knew she wasn’t meeting her mom’s food expectations,” Castle said. 

 To avoid unintentional harm, I like to use registered dietitian Jennifer Anderson’s method for discussing foods without labeling them. Read the text in her Instagram post to learn how to tailor your conversations to the ages of your children.  

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Do Not Pressure, Force or Bribe Children to EatPressuring children to eat can include pleading with them to take another bite, spoonfeeding them as they resist or bribing them with dessert. 

Young children are experts at understanding their bodies’ cues about food. They know when they’re hungry and when they’re fullIf we plead, force or bribe children to eat, we’re teaching them to ignore those cues. Using dessert as a bribe can lead over- or undereating as children focus on getting to the sweets. 

Alisha Grogan, a pediatric occupational therapist, says,“[] in the long run we’re accidentally reinforcing that the food that’s on their dinner plate really isn’t as good as the dessert. It sends the message that the food during the meal is something that just has to be endured to get the real prize.”  

Do Not Restrict FoodsSweet treats, fried foods and sugary drinks are everywhere. At some point, most children will develop a taste for themIf you don’t allow these foods in the house, it could cause a greater desire for them. This can lead to secret eating, binge eating and overeating 

Like adults, kids want what they can’t or don’t have. It’s human nature,” says Castle. 

Take away the candy, and kids can’t stop thinking about it. However, unlike adults, kids have less control over their biological drive to eat. 

 Maintain an eating schedule, and don’t stray from it. My son was a grazer, so we gave him snacks with milk or diluted juice throughout the day. Then, we were flummoxed when he wouldn’t eat during our main meals. Well, why would he? He ate all day. Once we set specific times for meals and snacks, we fell into a stressless feeding routine.  

Remember the Division of Responsibility. Renowned therapist, author and lecturer Ellyn Satter developed the Division of Responsibility to help make feeding your children less stressful. Basically, parents are responsible for what, when and where they serve their children food, and children are responsible for how much and whether to eat. Once I started to practice this method, mealtimes became much less stressful. I didn’t feel any need to pressure my son to eat, which meant he could listen to his own body and his hunger cues. I highly recommend reading through all of the resources from the Ellyn Satter Institute. 

Serve dessert with dinner. Wait, what? By serving a small portion of dessert with dinner, you’ve removed the feelings of restriction that can lead to cravings while making fun foods less of a novelty or soughtafter reward. When children know they get to have dessert and no foods are off limits, it can lessen their feelings of deprivation and guilt. They learn what a moderate portion is and how to incorporate fun foods into a balanced diet 

You don’t need to serve dessert every night or provide a fun food free-for-all. You can still set boundaries with your children, but your goal is to teach them balance. Jill Castle has some great tips for how to get started setting food boundaries. 

Repeatedly introduce new foods. Let your children get used to seeing new foods. My son’s reaction to them is usually “EWWW!” and that’s fine. Let your children know that they don’t have to eat the new food if they don’t want to, so there’s no pressure to eat – and no battles about eating! It can take children anywhere from 12 to 30 exposures to a new food before they’re willing to try it. 

Here are some other great ideas: 

  • Plant a garden together; 
  • Take your children grocery shopping and let them find fruits and vegetables they want to try; 
  • Prepare meals together; 
  • Try serving family-style meals. 

 Even if your children refuse to eat a rainbow of foods, it’s okay! It takes time, and your children’s limited eating habits don’t make you a bad parent. Give yourself a break, and please don’t compare your family’s dietary habits to anyone else’s. Even though my son isn’t interested in expanding his vegetable palate right now, we have gotten to a point where he will try a few new things – even if it’s a quick lick and a grimace. That’s a win in my book!  

Healthy Fruit Ice Pops Your Child Is Sure to Love

With so many delicious seasonal options, fruit-based treats are a perfect way to cool off in the summertime! These healthy ice pop recipes are sure to be crowd-pleasers, and the recipes are so quick and easy that little chefs can help make them, so get out your popsicle molds and start freezing!

Watermelon Kiwi Ice Pop

Ingredients

  • 3 kiwis
  • 3 to 4 cups of cubed watermelon

Directions

  1. Peel the kiwis and blend them in a blender for one minute or until smooth. Have your child help you pour the juice into your popsicle molds until the molds are about one-quarter full and freeze the molds for one hour.
  2. Slice a watermelon into chunks. Blend three to four cups of watermelon in a blender for one to two minutes on high until smooth.
  3. Have your child help you pour the watermelon juice into your popsicle molds and freeze them for another one to two hours.
  4. Once your popsicles are frozen, remove the molds from the freezer and run the outside of the molds under warm water for a few seconds so you can easily remove the popsicles.

Sourcehttps://www.soljinutrition.com/blog/2017/6/8/watermelon-popsicles-the-perfect-treat-for-those-hot-summer-days

Peach Strawberry Yogurt Layer Ice Pop

Ingredients

  • 3 cups of strawberries
  • 3 cups of peeled and sliced peaches
  • 2 tablespoons of honey
  • ⅔ cup of vanilla Greek yogurt

Directions

  1. Puree the strawberries with four teaspoons of honey, and set the mixture to the side.
  2. Puree the sliced peaches with two teaspoons of honey, and set the mixture to the side.
  3. Have your child help you create layered popsicles by adding two teaspoons of strawberry puree, one teaspoon of yogurt and two teaspoons of peach puree to the molds and repeating until your molds are almost full. Make one of the fruit purees the last layer.
  4. Tap the mold on the counter so the layers settle, then have your child use a spoon to drag vertically from the bottom of the mold to the top a few times to create a swirled pattern. Tap the molds on the countertop again to remove air bubbles.
  5. Freeze the popsicles for at least six hours.

Source – https://www.jessicagavin.com/make-your-own-homemade-fruit-popsicles/

Orange-Banana Smoothie Ice Pop

Ingredients

  • 1 6-oz. container of Greek yogurt
  • 1 cup of thawed orange juice concentrate
  • 2 large bananas
  • The zest of 1 lime
  • 1 tablespoon of fresh lime juice

Directions

  1. Puree the yogurt, thawed orange juice concentrate, bananas, lime zest and fresh lime juice together.
  2. Have your child help you pour the mixture into six three-ounce popsicle molds, or divide it among the cups of a small muffin tin and add a popsicle stick to each cup. Freeze the popsicles for four hours.
  3. Once your popsicles are frozen, remove the molds from the freezer and run the outside of the molds under warm water for a few seconds so you can easily remove the popsicles.

Sourcehttps://www.countryliving.com/food-drinks/recipes/a2845/orange-banana-smoothie-pops-recipe/

Don’t Have Time to Exercise? Do it With Your Kids

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As a working mom with a to-do list longer than the refrigerator, trying to find time to workout and raise happy, healthy children is nearly impossible. But who says you have to compartmentalize exercising and parenting? By exercising as a family, you can enjoy the best of both worlds.

Staying Fit as a Family

Unless you’re a professional athlete or trainer who works out for a living, exercise shouldn’t be something you separate from the rest of your life. Between work and other responsibilities, you’re already away from your children enough. By bringing them into your workout routine, you can spend quality time with them and stay fit.

There are numerous advantages associated with working out with kids. One of the biggest benefits is that it helps your kids see exercise as normal and healthy, as opposed to something that’s strange and unsatisfactory.

“Not only is including your kid in your workouts an effective way for him or her to have positive associations with exercise, it’s a great way for you to remember that working out shouldn’t always be a chore. So many adults are focused on sets and reps, when they could really benefit from playing,” trainer Naomi Nazario writes in Men’s Health..

The question is, how do you exercise with your kids in a manner that’s safe, effective, and challenging for all ages? The following suggestions may help:

Go For Walks Before or After Dinner

One of the easiest ways to get exercise is to take a nightly walk, either before or after dinner. While this isn’t rigorous exercise, it’s enough to get your blood flowing. Even more importantly, it provides an outlet for having conversations and seeing how your kids are doing on a heart level.

Play Games on the Trampoline

Older kids may enjoy neighborhood walks, but younger kids will get bored pretty quickly. Switch things up to keep each of your children fully engaged.

One idea is to play around on the trampoline – which is an extremely good platform for exercise. It engages your muscles and builds core strength. If you have a trampoline in your backyard, jump together. Don’t have a trampoline? Visit a local trampoline park and play games like H-O-R-S-E or dodgeball. This probably isn’t something you’ll do every day, but it’s a good weekly activity to mix things up.

Play Sports in the Backyard

If you have athletic kids who play sports – or even kids who like the idea of sports – you can get some really good exercise in by playing various games in the backyard or driveway.

For example, you and your kids can have a lot of fun playing basketball, kickball, or even four square. Over time, these may even become family traditions.

Create Fitness Competitions

Kids love competition. If you’re able to make fitness into a game, you’re much more likely to get your children involved on a regular basis. One idea is to have a weekly competition. Something as simple as the loser of a round of a game having to do certain exercises can result in a great workout.

Watch YouTube Workout Videos

As your kids get older and become more interested in organized workout routines, you may think about doing YouTube workout videos together. YouTube has a huge collection of workout videos from both amateurs and professional trainers. They’re free and can be accessed on demand in your own living room.

Finding Balance in Your Life

If you spend too much time working out on your own, you won’t have much of a relationship with your children. If you don’t workout enough, you’ll be unhealthy. Life is all about balance, and you need to look for ways to balance parenting and fitness. As this article shows, a little tweaking makes it possible to do both.

 

This article was written by Emily Green from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Banana Ghosts and Clementine Pumpkins

These spooky, healthy snacks are great for serving at your child’s Halloween party, and they make tasty afterschool treats. 

Banana Ghosts 

Ingredients 

  • Bananas 
  • Chocolate chips 
  • Chocolate-covered raisins 

Instructions 

  1. Peel a banana and cut it in half.  
  2. Place it on a plate with the pointed end facing up, and add two chocolate chips to each half for eyes. 
  3. Add a chocolate-covered raisin to each half for a mouth. 
  4. Repeat steps one through three to create a group of tasty ghosts. 

Clementine Pumpkins 

Ingredients 

  • Clementines 
  • Celery 

Instructions 

  1. Peel a clementine.
  2. Cut a small celery stick into one-inch pieces.
  3. Press celery stick into the top of the clementine to create the pumpkin stem. 
  4. Repeat steps one through three to create an entire pumpkin patch. 

How to Get Your Picky Eaters to Enjoy Healthy Foods

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By Jack Maypole, MD
Contributing Writer and Goddard School Educational Advisory Board Member

During my travels as a parent, it seemed that during my children’s early childhood and school-age years that snack time was all the time: It was in the car. It was in the stroller. Once, one of my daughters asked for a snack during dinner. Maybe that is the problem with our modern concept of snacking, which often results in non-nutritious grazing, most especially (in my brood) involving a hankering for items of the high-sodium, cheddar-y orange food group (the noble Cheez-It, say, or mac ‘n’ cheese). It need not be so, however. We can do better and not succumb to the temptations of highly processed foods. For busy families, it is possible to get out of a rut and into a groove, finding a balance of healthier menu items that can satisfy everyone and perhaps transform snack time. For those who can swing it, there are a variety of soft foods in foil packs, often with marketing touting their organic and healthful qualities, but these foods are pricey.

In my practice, I counsel families to make a list of their child’s favorite foods and then draw from that list the items that are age appropriate, tasty and easy to prepare and that will survive in a bag till midday. For the toddler set, finger foods rule. Serve soft items that disintegrate or are swallowed easily, such as cheese, cut fruit or finely chopped meat, in Tupperware, and you are good to go. For older children who can handle more substantial foods, it can be fun to offer teeny versions of bigger dishes, such as a small grilled cheese or some slices of fruit. Be thoughtful about items that might spoil in the heat of a summer’s day, and don’t hesitate to ask friends what works for them. That is where the best ideas come from, I find. Portion sizes need not be big (a salad plate’s worth is plenty), and I recommend that you keep it simple, not fussy. It turns out children eat every day, so keep it sustainable. Lastly, avoid sugary beverages. Given a choice, I’d offer children water over juice.

Whatever you choose, I have found that the picky eaters out there (read that as “most children”) do best if you provide them with a familiar item or two, and then periodically offer up new foods that they can try to expand their palates and repertoires. You can assess how you’re doing by seeing what comes back home at the end of the day and modify your approach accordingly. As ever, respect the food-allergy restrictions most schools have, communicate any your child may have and touch base with teachers and your child’s doctor if you are concerned your child may have an allergy.

Most of all, enjoy. Snack time is a fun time. Bon appétit!

Apple Ring Snacks 

 

Add a healthy twist to after-school snack time with these tasty apple rings! 

Ingredients 

  • One apple 
  • Your choice of nut or seed butter 
  • Raisins 
  • Sliced almonds 
  • Chopped walnuts 
  • Shredded coconut 

Instructions 

  1. Slice apple into thin rings and remove core from each ring.  
  1. Spread nut butter on one side of ring.  
  1. Top with almonds, walnuts, raisins and coconut.  
  1. Enjoy! 

 

Feel free to substitute chocolate chips for the raisins and/or chocolate-hazelnut spread for the nut butter. 

Three Simple Ways to Manage Sweets at Home

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What do birthday parties, Halloween and school functions have in common? The answer is food, particularly sweet treats. These events often come with a side of cake, cookies, candy and soda, which are all sugar-rich foods that many families try hard to limit at home.

Try as you might, children eventually find a way to consume them; we’re all born predisposed to desire sweets (De Cosmi, Scaglioni & Agnostoni, 2017).

Restricting foods and labeling them as good or bad can be problematic, but how can you ensure that your children are eating nutritious meals and not gorging themselves on sweets?

1. Change the labels.

There is no such thing as good food or bad food. Repeat this mantra.

Study after study has found that when foods are labeled this way, we respond with detrimental behaviors. Stigmatizing food can lead to eating disorders, shame, secret eating, depression and more (Rollin, 2015).

Jill Castle, a pediatric nutritionist, recommends using the terms “nourishing” and “fun” instead of good and bad or healthy and unhealthy.

Examples of nourishing foods include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and dairy products. Examples of fun foods include fried foods, chips, soda, cake and sugary beverages.

2. Implement the 90-10 rule.

Castle also recommends following the 90-10 rule, meaning 90% of your children’s meals will be nourishing foods and 10% will be fun foods (Castle, 2018). Let your children be part of this process. Explain what fun foods are, then help them identify some.

Only give your children two servings of fun foods a day.

3. Let your children choose.

Allow your children to choose the fun foods they’d like to eat whenever possible. This freedom is hugely important as children seek to exert their independence. Additionally, Castle says that this choice will help teach children how to self-regulate and use their decision-making skills.

Castle says, “The goal is to help your child pause and think through what she will eat during the day, and give her an opportunity to think ahead and practice decision-making skills with eating” (Castle, 2018).

What methods do you use to manage fun foods at home?

References

Castle, J. (2018). The 90-10 rule for managing treats. Retrieved from https://jillcastle.com/childhood-nutrition/fun-food-90-10-rule/

De Cosmi, V., Scaglioni, S. & Agnostoni, C. (2017). Early taste experiences and later food choices. Nutrients, 9(2):107.

Rollin, J. (2015). How the idea of “healthy eating” can be harmful. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/mindful-musings/201512/how-the-idea-healthy-eating-can-be-harmful?destination=node/1082948

How to Overcome Your Child’s Picky Eating Habits

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You were a picky eater when you were a child. Now your own child is, shall we say, highly discriminating on what he or she eats, too. Coincidence? A recent study says maybe not.

The study, by researchers from the University of Illinois, gathered information from the parents of 153 preschoolers. They found that while many factors can play a role in a child’s choosy eating, genes that are linked to a child’s sensory responses could be one of them.

What does this mean if you’re the parent of a picky eater? Do you simply throw up your hands and say it’s genetic?

Keep trying

Don’t give up on efforts to entice your child to eat a broader range of food, says Jennifer Hyland, RD, CSP, LD of Cleveland Clinic Children’s. It’s important to continue to expose children to new foods over time to get them to try them, she says.

There is a wide spectrum of behavior when it comes to picky eating, Ms. Hyland says. But for most children, picky eating does not go away on its own unless parents really work at it.

Research has shown it can take anywhere from 10 to 20 tries for a child to like a particular food, she says.

But you don’t want to force foods upon your child. Keep meals an enjoyable experience, Ms. Hyland says. One strategy is for parents to ask their children to take no-thank-you bites – which means they can say, “no thank you,” but they have to at least try the food. This leads to continued exposure, and over time, it’s hoped they will learn to develop a taste for these foods.

At meal time, Ms. Hyland says, it’s helpful to have at least one food on the plate that you know your child will eat. Also, but be sure to give everyone at the table the same foods.

“Try your best to cook the same meal for the whole family,” she says. “The child may not eat all of it, but it’s important that you encourage them to at least try, and that you set an example of trying these foods yourself, so that over time, they will learn to eat these foods.”

It begins during toddlerhood

It’s typical for picky eating to start during the toddler years, Ms. Hyland says.

“Normal picky-eating can start anywhere as early as age 2 or 3,” she says. “Usually during infancy, children are adventurous eaters and they’re trying new things. The picky eating really creeps up around the time they become toddlers. Parents will say, ‘My kid ate vegetables and they liked this and they liked that and now they don’t eat anything.’ We see that pretty frequently.” 

Should parents worry about a picky eater? If your child is underweight, you might be worried that your child isn’t getting enough nutrition. This results in parents giving their children whatever they want to eat to make sure they’re getting enough calories.

If this is you, it’s a  good time to meet with a registered dietitian or physician, because there are ways to combat that problem, while still improving the picky eating habits, Ms. Hyland says.

The most important thing a parent can do with a choosy eater is be consistent and not give up, Ms. Hyland says.

However, if a child has chewing or swallowing issues, or shows severe anxiety about trying new foods,  talk to a doctor, because you child may need the help of a behavioral specialist or multidisciplinary feeding program.

Complete results of the study can be found in the Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics.

 

 

This article was written by Children’s Health Team from Cleveland Clinic and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Five Benefits of Teaching Children to Cook

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Cooking is as important a life skill as swimming or riding a bike; however, like those other skills, cooking is not generally taught in school. Parents are usually responsible for teaching their children to cook. Here are five benefits of teaching children this valuable skill.

  1. It’s a great bonding experience. If you teach your child how to make a favorite family recipe, she will have a memory that can last a lifetime.
  2. It leads to healthy eating habits. By purchasing fresh, healthy ingredients and using them to prepare a meal at home with your child, you will give him a better understanding of what healthy eating looks and tastes like.
  3. It helps build math skills. Cooking involves math, such as measuring out a cup of milk, counting eggs or doubling a recipe. Using math practically in the kitchen helps bolster those skills.
  4. It helps boost confidence. If you serve spaghetti and meatballs and announce to the rest of your family that your child helped prepare the meal, it may give him a sense of accomplishment, which will increase his self-esteem.
  5. It encourages the development of communication and collaboration skills. If you and your child are baking a cake, you have to talk about what you are doing, such as measuring flour or stirring batter. You must also work together to assemble the cake.