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Posts Tagged ‘Dads’

Celebrating Moms, Dads, Grandparents and All Who Raise Children! – Lee Scott

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Lee Scott, Chair of The Goddard School’s Education Advisory Board and early education programming expert talks about celebrating Moms, Dads, Grandparents and All Who Raise Children!

It is spring and a great time to celebrate all those who parent children, whether they be moms, dads, stepparents, aunts, uncles, grandparents or others.

Families today come in all forms. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2016 report, the majority of America’s children live in families with two parents (69 percent). The report does not distinguish parent types such as biological parents, same-sex parents, or stepparents. Single parents comprise 23 percent of households with children followed by those headed by grandparents, other relatives, or foster parents.

Children learn about Mother’s and Father’s Day celebrations through their school, television programs and advertisements, and/or friends. It may be confusing or awkward for some children if their parents are not the stereotypical mom and dad. We can support these celebrations by broadening our appreciation for all parents. We then shift the focus of the celebration to parenting and not on the type of parent.

There are many fun ways to celebrate these special days. Try the classic homemade card expressing appreciation for the parents or a special breakfast prepared by the children. These gifts still work today as they did in the early 1900s when the days became official. Neither has to be elaborate. The fun is watching the children make and share their creations.

Another wonderful way to share appreciation for parents is through storytelling. Spend time as a family sharing stories of the past and present, which provide children with a sense of belonging and connecting to family and the world around them. You can also read books about parents and families. Here are five of my favorites that celebrate all parents:

  1. Oh My Baby, Little One, Kathi Appelt and Jane Dyer

A mother’s love is carried throughout a young child’s day, ending with the celebration of being together again. The story helps children and parents with separation anxiety.

  1. Who’s in My Family?: All About Our Families, Robie H. Harris and Nadine Bernard Westcott

A trip to the zoo helps two children learn about all types of families. They explore not only the animals but also all the families visiting the zoo.

  1. Mommy, Mama, and Me, Leslea Newman and Carol Thompson

This book is fun because it goes through daily routines in a playful, rhyming manner. Great for young ones! There is also one titled Daddy, Papa, and Me.

  1. The Family Book, Todd Parr

The book focuses on how families, although often very different, are alike in love and caring for each other. This is my go-to book for beginning conversations about families, and I love the fun illustrations.

  1. Molly’s Family, Nancy Garden and Sharon Wooding

A young girl learns how to talk about her two-mom family in school. At first it is difficult, but her teacher helps along the way. Very helpful for giving children ways to answer the question: why do you have two mommies (or daddies)?

 

No matter what type of family you have, you can celebrate who you are on these special spring days.

Diving into Dad Duties: Five Tips For New Dads

Fatherhood is a profound, wonderful journey full of moments that you will cherish for a lifetime. Here are five tips for dads who are new to the experience.

  1. Master the art of diapering. Diapering is part of Fatherhood 101. Changing a diaper is a simple Get%20Set%20Girl%20and%20Father_jpgway to help keep your baby happy while bonding with your baby.
  2. Work as a team to handle baby duties. You and your spouse are a team, so try to share all the responsibilities. Make sure to help out when your partner is tired or busy.
  3. Communicate, communicate, communicate. When you’re part of a team, communication is key. If you’re going to be late coming home from work, call your partner. If you’re not sure how to handle a baby-related task, ask someone. Opening the lines of communication can work wonders.
  4. Be patient. Fatherhood isn’t an exact science, so remember that becoming the best dad you can be takes time. Enjoy those moments when you’re still figuring things out and remember to laugh.
  5. Take care of yourself. Being a good dad means being there for your child. Make sure you are staying healthy and avoiding unnecessary risks. Exercise, watch your diet and drive carefully.