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Posts Tagged ‘Dentist’

Afraid of the Dentist? 6 Tips for Helping a Fearful Child

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Make your child’s next trip to the dentist a fun experience with these insider tips.

Taking a child to the dentist is rarely simple. Dentist anxiety and phobia are problems for about 30 million to 40 million people in the United States, according to Colgate. And in many instances, these challenges prevent people from getting the dental care they need to maintain clean, healthy and beautiful smiles.

If your child is scared of the dentist, it is a good idea to address his or her fear as soon as you can. That way, you can show your son or daughter that the dentist is here to help, not harm. You may even reach a point where your child actually enjoys going to the dentist—really!

Below are five tips to help your child overcome his or her fear of the dentist and put them on track for a lifetime of strong oral health.

1. Arrange a Pre-Appointment Meeting

A quick meet-and-greet with your child’s dentist can go a long way toward easing his or her fear or anxiety. This meeting will give your child an opportunity to get acquainted with a dental office and staff. It also gives the dentist a chance to learn about your child, build a rapport with him or her and take the first step toward fostering a long-lasting relationship.

2. Watch Your Language

When you talk about a dental appointment with your son or daughter, try not to use negative words like “hurt,” “pain” and “shot.” Instead, focus on positive words like “clean” and “healthy.” You can also use kid-friendly terms to describe various dental issues, procedures and tools. Rather than say “cavities” or “tooth decay,” for example, you may want to use “sugar bugs” to describe these oral health problems. Kid-friendly terms are not intended to fool a child; conversely, they can be used to set the stage for a positive experience during your child’s next dental visit.

3. Keep Things Simple

Your child might want to know a lot in the weeks and days leading up to a dental appointment. If you get bombarded with questions, try to keep things as simple as possible. Maintain a positive attitude, but don’t tell your child that everything will be fine. If you do and a dentist ultimately discovers that your child is dealing with severe oral health problems, your son or daughter may lose trust in both you and your dentist.

4. Host a Pretend Dental Visit

Practice makes perfect, particularly when it comes to helping your child alleviate his or her fear of the dentist. By hosting your very own practice dental office visit at home, you can help your child prepare for an upcoming dental appointment. During a pretend dental visit, you can count your child’s teeth and hold up a mirror to show him or her how a dentist evaluates the teeth. Of course, it is important to avoid simulating drilling sounds or any other dental office noises that might otherwise make your child’s fear or anxiety levels rise.

5. Provide Positive Reinforcement

Give your child something to look forward to following a dental appointment—you will be happy you did. For instance, you can reward the little patient for good behavior during a dental appointment by visiting a playground afterward. Remember, if your child feels good following a dental appointment, he or she may be more likely to respond positively to the dentist in the future.

6. Take Your Children to a Specialist in Pediatric Dentistry

Make your child feel at ease by taking them to a pediatric dentist. They’re specifically trained to treat children and have a great understanding of child behavior. Their offices are also designed to accommodate small children and make the visits fun.

Lastly, if you want your child to feel comfortable going to the dentist, it typically helps to start dental appointments at a young age. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommends a child visit the dentist for the first time no later than age 1 or within six months of his or her first tooth erupting. If your child gets accustomed to dental appointments early, he or she can avoid dental fear and anxiety. Encouraging great oral hygiene habits from a young age can also help mitigate any serious future dental issues.

As the top awarded pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, and parent dentistry practice in the greater San Diego area, The Super Dentists are dedicated to providing an exceptional dental experience for both kids and parents. Since 1996, The Super Dentists strive to continue to empower parents with the knowledge they need to make well-informed decisions about their children’s dental health.

 

This article was written by The Super Dentists from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Tips for a Child to Overcome Dental Phobia

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Even though this article was originally written with working mothers in mind, this is great information for all parents!

If you are out of the house for more than 8 hours a day, it can be quite difficult for you to control your kids’ dental anxiety, fear or phobia. TV, YouTube and conversation with other kids can be prospective sources of such phobias. However, it is very important for you to remove such apprehensions of the child for their own good. There are many emergency dental specialists in Brisbane, who can cure oral health issues among kids with anxiety without causing them any additional pain.

Dental anxiety can happen for a variety of reasons. Some children are afraid of their first visit to the dentist mainly due to a fear of the unknown. For others, a past experience can be responsible for a child’s refusal to visit the dentist’s clinic. However, there are a few steps you can do that can help your child.

Recognize the Fear: Talk to your child and observe its behaviour. Note down the causes of phobia you see. Once you understand them, it will be easier to find ways to get out of them.

Find a Good Dentist: While looking for the right dentist focus your search on a person who is specialised in treating anxious patients. Call them first and try to understand whether the communicator on the other side is accommodating or dismissive. The moment you are assured of the doctor’s attitude, you can decide to pay a visit along with the child.

Discuss the Cause of Anxiety: If your doubts are not completely gone after calling the clinic, it is time for you to talk them over with the doctor. Try giving the dentist a direct call to clarify all your suspicions. Confirm an appointment, only if you are completely convinced that the treatment procedure is tailored for children. Pain is the reason most children are afraid of the dentist as cartoon and TV have shown the dentist as a person who is always drilling teeth which is only a small part of what a dentist does.

Accompany Your Child for The Visit: Never send an apprehensive child for a dental appointment alone. Always accompany them. If possible, get the appointment at a time favourable for you to be with them. The child will be more confident if a parent is around.

Resort to Relaxation Exercises: Controlled breathing and different other exercises can help the child remain calm during the treatment. You can find the relaxation exercises on different relevant websites. Distractions can also be helpful in keeping the children relaxed during the treatment. As an accompanying parent, you can try and distract the kid. Note that most experienced dentist will know how to distract the child and make them feel comfortable.

It is always a tough exercise for a working mother to juggle between work and understanding child psychology. Hope the tips offered in this post will be of much help to the parents.The dentist is one of those things that your child might never enjoy as people rarely do. This hygiene will allow them to have a great smile and avoid costly dental procedures later in life.

 

This article was written by Emily Green from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Meeting the Dentist

Your baby’s teeth are just as vital as your adult teeth. Primary teeth create space for permanent teeth. They also help your little one when she begins speaking and chewing food. According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, a child’s first dental visit should be after her first tooth arrives, and it should occur before her first birthday, whichever exciting event happens first.

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It is important to schedule a visit early. This will allow your dentist to check for any signs of dental problems, like tooth decay or issues from extended thumb sucking, before they become severe. The dentist can also show you the best way to clean your child’s teeth, recommend oral care products and answer any questions you may have about the growth of your child’s teeth. After assessing your child’s teeth, gums and jaw, your dentist can recommend when to schedule a second visit.

Five Ways to Encourage Good Dental Hygiene

Getting children to take care of their teeth can be challenging. Here are five ways to encourage good dental health.

  1. Start routines early. Establishing a daily brushing and flossing routine for your child early on may help him adopt the routine and stick to it.twenty20_97663680-2916-4268-914b-ef8dbfd2ed4f
  2. Limit the consumption of sugary foods and drinks. This includes fruit juice, which contains more sugar than you might think. If your child drinks juice, diluting it with water can reduce the sugar content in each serving.
  3. Be a good example. Make brushing and flossing a family affair; brush and floss at the same time as your child. Show him that you make dental hygiene a priority.
  4. Go shopping for dental supplies with your child. Ask her to pick out her own toothbrush, toothpaste and floss. Having her own special supplies may inspire her to use them.
  5. Schedule regular dental check-ups and cleanings. A child-friendly dentist can reinforce good dental habits and provide advice on brushing and flossing techniques.

Going to the Dentist

Many new parents wonder, “When should I take my child to the dentist for the first time?” According to the American Dental Association, your child should have their first dental visit by their first birthday, or sometime within six months of when they get their first tooth.

When looking for a dentist for your child, you may choose to go to your regular family dentist or a pediatric dentist. There are advantages to both, such as familiarity with your family dentist and specialized training for children with the pediatric dentist. The most important aspect to consider is that you and your child are comfortable with your choice. If you choose to find a pediatric dentist, it’s best to ask your family dentist for a recommendation or visit the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Web site for a list of pediatric dentists in your area.

During your child’s first visit, the dentist will speak with you in depth about your child’s overall health history, their oral health history (including teething, biting, thumb-sucking and feeding) and answer any questions you may have. Then, the dentist will examine your child’s teeth, gums, jaw and oral tissues. The dentist may also demonstrate the best way to clean your child’s teeth at home, provide information on what to expect as your child grows and offer suggestions for your child’s optimal oral health. Most dentists will wait until follow-up visits (within the next six months) to professionally clean and polish your child’s teeth, take x-rays and give a fluoride treatment.