{     Offering the Best Childhood Preparation for Social and Academic Success.     }

Posts Tagged ‘Education’

6 Scientifically Proven Ways To Raise Smarter Kids

Zz04ZDhiM2Y0ZWJkMGRkZmUzYTdlYjRjMzU1YWY3NjE1Zg==.jpg

These simple activities can improve your child’s intellectual development.

Setting children up for intellectual success later in life is high on the list of concerns for many parents, but amidst the everyday pressures of parenting, broad goals like “making your child smarter” can feel overwhelming and impractical. Fortunately, encouraging cognitive development doesn’t have to be complicated. Add a few of these proven activities to your child’s routine, and you’ll foster intelligence in manageable, positive ways.

1. Encourage playing outside.

Structured sports are wonderful for children, but making time for unstructured play is just as important, if not more so. Research has proven that unstructured play has an integral role in the development of social intelligence. As schools eliminate recess time, making sure your young ones have time to themselves outdoors is critical. Whether you usher them out the door to build an elaborate sledding hill, play hours of tag with their friends or head to the park for supervised play doesn’t matter; leaving them to set their own boundaries and interact with children their own age facilitates crucial prefrontal cortex development that they’ll draw upon in social situations for the rest of their lives.

2. Let them play video games.

When your kids do come inside, whether on a rainy day or a dark winter evening after school, don’t worry if they race straight to their gaming console. Moderating screen time is important, but as Cheryl Olson, Sc.D., asserts, video games—even those not made to be educational—offer myriad benefits to kids. From problem-solving to creative expression to social interaction with friends, video games challenge children and give them a rare sense of autonomy. After age 10, kids’ interpretations of complex games deepens and expands, but children under 10 aren’t exempt from the benefits of simpler games.

3. Make sleep a family priority.

If you need more motivation to set a sleep schedule and stick to it, let your kids be your inspiration. After the regimented sleep schedules of babyhood and the toddler years, letting bedtimes slacken when your kids reach school age is understandable. However, if those looser sleep schedules turn into patterns of insufficient sleep, your child will suffer, and unfortunately, many already do. Right now, as many as 20 to 25 percent of school-age children don’t get enough sleep.

That lack of rest affects their alertness, their attention spans, and their ability to concentrate in the classroom, which can have long-lasting effects on grades. According to the National Sleep Foundation, kids between the ages of 6 and 13 need nine to 11 hours, with older teens functioning best with eight to 10 hours each night. Consider limiting use of electronics before bedtime and creating a new nighttime routine with your child that takes their burgeoning independence and new hobbies into consideration.

4. Try music lessons.

Has your child ever expressed interest in music? If not, you may want to gently encourage it. Researchers at Northwestern University have found evidence of a link between music and literacy. The key, according to researchers, is that kids need to be active participants in music lessons. If children aren’t engaged with and creating music, they miss out on many of its benefits. Try talking to your child about enrolling in their school’s band or orchestra, or consider private lessons if they express interest.

Kids who do embrace making and learning music will gain “neurophysiological distinction” as they decipher differences between specific sounds. This heightened awareness of sounds carries over to improved literacy for many children, which is an indicator of intelligence both in the classroom and on standardized tests they’ll take later on.

5. Emphasize effort and hard work.

Decades of research on motivation and intelligence have led Stanford University’s Carol S. Dweck to conclude that for kids, an emphasis on effort and hard work has long-lasting, positive effects on intelligence. She asserts that praising children for being “gifted” or “talented” connotes an entitlement to success, leaving them lacking the motivation needed when concepts or good grades stop coming easily. Instead, recognizing your children for finding ways to solve problems or for following through on a difficult assignment teaches them that perseverance leads to positive results, and that success rarely comes easily—knowledge that will serve them well as they grow.

With a bit of strategy, you can introduce changes to your child’s routine that promote learning, problem solving, social skills and hard work—without replacing precious free time with flashcards and regimented learning. You’ll probably even find that many of these suggestions bring benefits to your child that go far beyond the classroom. Find an approach that works for you and your child, and remember that IQ is not the only indicator of future success.

—Kelsey Down

This story originally appeared on fairygodboss.com.


Kelsey Down is a freelance writer in Salt Lake City who has been featured on publications including Elite Daily, VentureBeat and SUCCESS. She’s covered fun stuff like why TV reboots need to stop and how to hack sleep as a workout, and she also writes about personal and family wellness. Follow her on Twitter @kladown23.

 

This article was written by Fairygodboss from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Five Tips for Developing Healthy Learning Habits

  • Encourage play. Playing alone and with others not only builds brain development, it also helps children develop social skills and a sense of ethics. The most effective play is free of evaluation and correction (after all, throwing a ball shouldn’t be “right” or “wrong”), while promoting autonomy.
  • Play together. In addition to their ABCs and 123s, preschool children are learning and developing life skills that will shape who they grow into as adults.  One of these building blocks is learning to play well with others and accepting one another’s differences.
  • Get adequate sleep and proper nutrition. Your child will do their best if they get to sleep early and eat a healthy breakfast each day before school. A daily diet of junk food is not compatible with learning. It can cause listlessness and hyperactivity, which can impair a child’s ability to learn. Skipping breakfast, especially, is a detriment to a child’s education.
  • Continue year-long education. Routine provides structure, which is often lacking during the summer months when children all too quickly become detached from the lessons they learned throughout the school year.  Maintaining a schedule throughout the summer supports an environment that is less of a contrast to the classroom and provides a healthy balance between building skills, play and rest.
  • Turn off the screens. The American Academy of Pediatrics urges parents to avoid television and other electronic media for children two years of age and younger. Time spent in front of a computer, TV, video game or other similar devices can interfere with schoolwork, physical activity, curious exploration, social interaction and play.

Goddard Systems, Inc.® Welcomes Dr. Craig Bach to Serve Inaugural Role of Vice President for Education

Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI), franchisor of The Goddard School®, a leader in franchised educational childcare for 25 years, is pleased to announce Dr. Craig Bach to serve as its first Vice President for Education.

Dr. Bach, an educational researcher with more than 15 years of experience in both K-12 and postsecondary education, will be responsible for overseeing licensing and compliance, accreditation, quality assurance, training, and curriculum on behalf of the nearly 400 Goddard School locations across the nation. He will serve as part of the company’s senior leadership team and will report to GSI Chief Operating Officer (COO) Dzana Homan.

“In this new role, Dr. Bach will focus on not only continuing to build and retain a network of quality educators, but also to develop metrics to ensure high-quality education is consistently delivered and achieved throughout the system,” said Dzana Homan.

“Part of my role will be to translate the value of the educational work we do to the business side of our organization — positive educational outcomes are not only good for our children, they are good for our business as well,” said Dr. Bach.

Longer term, Dr. Bach will lead a research team to study the impact a Goddard education has at the first, second and third grade levels.

“Assessment and evaluation will be fundamental to everything my team implements at GSI,” said Dr. Bach. “Studies continue to show the importance of early education in building a solid foundation for a child’s academic success. We want to make sure that we build on that research and demonstrate that our educationally rich programs continue to provide children with a foundation for a successful future.”

Prior to joining GSI, Dr. Bach served as the Vice Provost for Institutional Research, Assessment, and Effectiveness and Teaching Professor in the School of Education for Drexel University. During his time with Drexel in the School of Education, he served as Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigator on over $5 million in funded projects, including a NASA funded project to use instructional technologies to teach fractal geometry to high school students, the Pennsylvania Department of Education funded Drexel Tech Prep Consortium and a NSF funded grant to develop online mathematics mentoring with the Math Forum.

Dr. Bach also has experience in the for-profit space. He served as the Vice President of the Office of Institutional Effectiveness at Kaplan Higher Education where he managed five teams working on assessment, research, analytics, data management, and performance measurement. Additionally, he worked as an instructional designer for Futurekids — a pre-K to Grade 6 franchise business.

“Our appointment of Dr. Bach comes at an important time in our nation’s emphasis on early childhood education,” said Dzana Homan. “We are impressed with Dr. Bach’s well-rounded experience in the field of education and eager to build on our successful program with his fresh perspective and insights.”

For more information, visit www.goddardschool.com.