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Posts Tagged ‘Engineering’

Barbie’s New Robotics Engineer Doll is the Hero Our Girls Need

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She’s also releasing an e-book.

Since 1959, Barbie has held many different careers, from paratrooper and pet stylist to ballerina and surgeon, but this latest incarnation feels especially relevant nowadays—considering how quickly our technology is advancing.

Today, the brand behind the iconic doll launched Robotics Engineer Barbie as the official “Career of the Year” doll, in order to promote young girls’ interest in the STEM fields.

Currently, only 24 percent of STEM jobs are held by females, which is a shame considering there are so many talented young women out there who would totally slay in these fields.

Now, with the help of Barbie, that will hopefully soon change, and pique more girls’ interest in holding careers in science, tech, engineering or math.

In addition to releasing the doll, which will come in four different skin tones, and will retail for $14, the Barbie brand will also help teach girls how to code. As part of their multi-year partnership with game-based platform Tynker, they’ve launched six free Barbie-inspired coding lessons, available starting today on tynker.com/BarbieYCBA, that teach logic, problem-solving and the fundamentals of coding. They’ll also be introducing seven more lessons with Tynker throughout the year.

“For almost 60 years, Barbie has exposed girls to roles where women are underrepresented to show them that they can be anything,” said Lisa McKnight, General Manager and Senior Vice President, Barbie, in a press release. “By playing with Robotics Engineer Barbie on and offline, we are giving girls a new platform for play in their imaginary world and teaching them important skills for their real world.”

What’s more, the brand is giving a grant to Black Girls Code, a nonprofit that provides technology education for African-American girls, and gifting dolls to youngsters at their robotics workshops. Barbie will also be releasing the kid-friendly beginner coding e-book, Code Camp for Barbie and Friends, which will be available on Amazon. To create the book, the brand collaborated with Information Science Professor and coder Casey Fiesler, Ph.D.

They also released the video below, which has little girls mentioning the types of jobs where women are underrepresented.

Although Barbie is no stranger to the STEM fields, since she’s already been an astronaut, scientist, video game developer and computer engineer, it’s still refreshing to see the iconic doll in another job that many girls wouldn’t automatically associate with women. As the little girls in the video asked, “If girls can’t see women doing these jobs, how will we know we can?”

 

This article was written by Maricar Santos from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Three Easy Science Experiments Your Child is Sure to Love

IMG_2672_philly_00429Children have a natural curiosity in STEAM subjects (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics). You can encourage your little scientist’s interests by conducting the following easy experiments at home.

Milk Fireworks: Pour whole milk into a baking pan. Add drops of red and blue food coloring. Add a “squirt” or two of dishwashing liquid, and watch the colors burst and swirl! When the “fireworks” slow down, add another couple of drops of dishwashing liquid to get them going again. Explanation: The soap separates the fat from the other liquids in the milk, causing patterns to appear.

Dancing Raisins: Put raisins (or dried corn or macaroni) in a clear cup. Fill the cup with lemon-lime soda. Watch how the raisins bob and sink in the cup. Ask your child what makes the raisins do this. Explanation: The gas bubbles in the soda lift each raisin up, and when the bubbles reach the surface and pop, the raisins sink.

Salt & Vinegar Pennies: Put ¼ cup of white vinegar into a clear plastic or glass bowl. Add one teaspoon of table salt and stir until the salt dissolves. Dip a dull, dirty penny halfway into the liquid, holding it there for 10 to 20 seconds. Remove the penny from the liquid. What does your child see? Explanation: Salt and vinegar create a weak acid that dissolves copper oxide, which is the tarnish on a dull penny.

*An adult should oversee all activities. Activities may not be appropriate for all ages.