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Posts Tagged ‘Father’s Day’

Celebrating Moms, Dads, Grandparents and All Who Raise Children! – Lee Scott

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Lee Scott, Chair of The Goddard School’s Education Advisory Board and early education programming expert talks about celebrating Moms, Dads, Grandparents and All Who Raise Children!

It is spring and a great time to celebrate all those who parent children, whether they be moms, dads, stepparents, aunts, uncles, grandparents or others.

Families today come in all forms. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2016 report, the majority of America’s children live in families with two parents (69 percent). The report does not distinguish parent types such as biological parents, same-sex parents, or stepparents. Single parents comprise 23 percent of households with children followed by those headed by grandparents, other relatives, or foster parents.

Children learn about Mother’s and Father’s Day celebrations through their school, television programs and advertisements, and/or friends. It may be confusing or awkward for some children if their parents are not the stereotypical mom and dad. We can support these celebrations by broadening our appreciation for all parents. We then shift the focus of the celebration to parenting and not on the type of parent.

There are many fun ways to celebrate these special days. Try the classic homemade card expressing appreciation for the parents or a special breakfast prepared by the children. These gifts still work today as they did in the early 1900s when the days became official. Neither has to be elaborate. The fun is watching the children make and share their creations.

Another wonderful way to share appreciation for parents is through storytelling. Spend time as a family sharing stories of the past and present, which provide children with a sense of belonging and connecting to family and the world around them. You can also read books about parents and families. Here are five of my favorites that celebrate all parents:

  1. Oh My Baby, Little One, Kathi Appelt and Jane Dyer

A mother’s love is carried throughout a young child’s day, ending with the celebration of being together again. The story helps children and parents with separation anxiety.

  1. Who’s in My Family?: All About Our Families, Robie H. Harris and Nadine Bernard Westcott

A trip to the zoo helps two children learn about all types of families. They explore not only the animals but also all the families visiting the zoo.

  1. Mommy, Mama, and Me, Leslea Newman and Carol Thompson

This book is fun because it goes through daily routines in a playful, rhyming manner. Great for young ones! There is also one titled Daddy, Papa, and Me.

  1. The Family Book, Todd Parr

The book focuses on how families, although often very different, are alike in love and caring for each other. This is my go-to book for beginning conversations about families, and I love the fun illustrations.

  1. Molly’s Family, Nancy Garden and Sharon Wooding

A young girl learns how to talk about her two-mom family in school. At first it is difficult, but her teacher helps along the way. Very helpful for giving children ways to answer the question: why do you have two mommies (or daddies)?

 

No matter what type of family you have, you can celebrate who you are on these special spring days.

Three Cute Craft Ideas for Father’s Day

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When you hear the term Father’s Day, what is the first thing you think of? Does “new tie” come to mind? That is one of the most common gifts and has become a traditional purchase around Father’s Day. Instead of going with the same old gift though, enlist the help of your favorite artist – your preschooler! Dad will be more excited to have a hand-crafted gift from his little pride and joy rather than a store-bought present. Here are three cute DIY gift ideas for Dad.

  1. Pencil holder

Gather a clean can or jar and some construction paper. Assist your child in cutting the construction paper to fit around the can and then help him glue the paper to the can. After the glue has dried, ask your child to draw pictures or place stickers on the can, encouraging his creativity. This is a great gift for Dad’s desk at work or at home.

  1. Stick photo frame

For this activity, you will need wooden craft sticks and a lively photo of your little one with Dad. Glue the sticks in the shape of a square (this step should be assisted by an adult), leaving a large enough space for the photo in the center. Once the glue has dried, encourage your child to decorate the frame with stickers or a message such as “I love you, Dad!” Then tape the photo face-down to the back side of the frame and it is complete!

  1. Create a book about Dad

On blank sheets of paper, write a statement about Dad on each page and ask your child to fill in the blanks. Depending on age, you can help your child with the writing portion of this step. Encourage your child to draw a picture that goes with the sentence on each page. Statements can include:

“This is what my dad looks like”

“The greatest thing about my dad is ________.”

“My dad is best at _______.”

“My dad’s favorite food is ______.”

“My favorite thing to do with my dad is _______.”

Bind the pages with staples or use a hole punch and bind the pages together by lacing ribbon through the holes.

*An adult should oversee all activities. Activities may not be appropriate for all ages.

 

The Importance of Father’s Day

Each year, the third Sunday in June is a day dedicated to showing our dads just how important they are. We should twenty20_0ebc9527-d7cb-434a-86e1-6d4a3039c5a8remember to appreciate our fathers for everything they do for us year-round, but Father’s Day is a great opportunity to make sure they know how much we love them. While it is important to spend this day with Dad, however, don’t forget to show Grandpa and your uncle some love, too. This can be done with a phone call or by sending a card or small gift.

If you cannot be with Grandpa or your uncle on Father’s Day, plan a trip to make up for it. Fishing and camping trips are wonderful ways to step away from reality and focus on family bonding. As for Dad, ask him how he would like to spend Father’s Day with the family. Some ideas include mini golfing, a child-friendly construction activity such as building a bird house or simply playing catch in the backyard. And lastly, be sure to tell Dad how much you love and appreciate him and everything he has done for you.

What are some activities your family does to celebrate Father’s Day?

Popsicle Stick Puzzle

With Father’s Day right around the corner, here is a craft that is not only fun for children, but fun for dads, too!

Puzzle Collage

Materials

  • 8-10 large Popsicle sticks
  • White glue
  • Tape
  • Small utility knife (for the adult helper’s use only!)
  • A copy of a favorite photo of daddy

Instructions

  1. Lay the Popsicle sticks side by side so they align at the top and bottom.
  2. Place pieces of tape along the top and bottom of all the sticks to hold them together.
  3. Flip the sticks over, center the photo and stick it to the Popsicle sticks using white glue.
  4. Place a few heavy books on top and let it dry completely.
  5. When dry, remove the tape on the back and have the adult helper use the utility knife to separate the Popsicle sticks and cut through the photo.
  6. Mix the sticks up and wrap them or bundle them together and tie a ribbon around them and give to Dad on Father’s Day!

*An adult should oversee all activities. Activities may not be appropriate for all ages.

Father’s Day Craft: Popsicle Stick Puzzle

With Father’s Day right around the corner, here is a craft that is not only fun for the children, but fun for dads, too!

Materials

  • 8-10 large Popsicle sticks
  • White glue
  • Tape
  • Small utility knife (for the adult helper’s use only!)
  • A copy of a favorite photo of daddy

 

Instructions

  1. Lay the Popsicle sticks side-by-side so they align at the top and bottom.
  2. Place pieces of tape along the top and bottom of all the sticks to hold them together.
  3. Flip the sticks over, center the photo and stick it to the Popsicle sticks using white glue.
  4. Place a few heavy books on top and let it dry completely.
  5. When dry, remove the tape on the back and have the adult helper use the utility knife to separate the Popsicle sticks and cut through the photo.
  6. Mix the sticks up and wrap them or bundle them together and tie a ribbon around them and give to dad on Father’s Day!

 

*An adult should oversee all activities.  Activities may not be appropriate for all ages.

Beyond the Tie: Celebrating Father’s Day

Tired of the traditional breakfast in bed? Over the cliché shirt and tie combo? Make Dad’s Day a little more rad.

  • Have a picnic, take a walk or just relax outdoors—let Dad choose how he would most enjoy relaxing with the family.
  • Plan a day of not planning. Make today the day to put aside all errands, chores and projects—help Dad to enjoy a pressure-free day.
  • Father’s Day is not only for your children to celebrate Dad—let him know just how impressed you are with how amazing a father he is to your children.
  • Give Dad the gift of a few hours by himself! We all need time to ourselves to refocus now and then. Dad may be thrilled to schedule an unexpected tee time, or to curl up with that new bestseller he’s been eyeing up.
  • Don’t limit the father festivities to just your children’s dad; encourage your little ones to call their grandpas and other special male role models, too.
  • Most importantly, let Dad know how appreciated he is. Help your children to write (or color) a thank you note, encourage them to create a special song or lend them a hand in whipping up a special treat. Homemade gifts or projects can sometimes be the best at conveying your child’s love and appreciation for Dad.

Happy Father’s Day: Goodies for Daddy Snack!

This Father’s Day, surprise dad with his own special snack mix! With help from an adult, little ones can mix up their own special creation for dad using a combination of the snack items below (and anything else you think dad might like). Then, decorate a disposable food container with markers, paint and craft supplies to store dad’s special treat!

  • Nuts (peanuts, cashews, almonds, etc.)
  • Raisins
  • M&M’s®
  • Cheerios®
  • Chex® cereal
  • Small pretzels
  • Teddy Grahams®
  • Small cheese snack crackers
  • Goldfish® crackers

 

When complete, consider writing a little ingredients list for dad to attach to the package, such as: “Ingredients: peanuts (because I’m your peanut), raisins (because you’re so good at raisin’ me), Teddy Grahams (for a big bear hug) and M&M’s (because you’re so sweet).”

The Evolution of the Role of Fathers

Dr. Kyle Pruett AAs I look back on my experiences as a father across a few decades, it is evident that the role of fathers and expectations in society has significantly changed.  More men today are physically and emotionally engaged with their children than before the industrial revolution, especially the younger ones. Co-parenting is the expectation among most newly marrying couples; the women want the help, and the men want to be closer to their kids than they were to their fathers. With support from women and society, increasingly active fathering is crossing many social and economic barriers.

And this is quite a good thing – for the men, the women, but most especially their children. Most men figure parenting out on the job (just like women) but they do it best when they don’t try to mother (which of course they really can’t) – comforting, disciplining, problem-solving, rough-housing, teasing in their own fashion. The science to date reassures these men – and maybe more importantly their spouses – that children respond positively to these differences, wind up able to manage and enjoy life better when they have a positively engaged dad or trusted fathering figure in their lives – the earlier the better.

Enjoy fatherhood — and know you are making a world of a difference.