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Posts Tagged ‘Halloween’

Socially Safe Halloween Masks Craft

Your Halloween celebrations might be physically distanced this year, but wearing a face covering for the festivities doesn’t mean your child has to compromise on a cool costume. Here’s how you can make your child’s face mask part of their trick-or-treating gear. 

 Materials 

  • Non-toxic foam sheets 
  • Washable glue sticks  
  • Hot glue gun 
  • Disposable paper masks 
  • Paper straws 

 Directions 

  1. Talk with your child to decide what kind of mask you should make. The possibilities are endless. If you need a little inspiration, take a look at this video for some ideas!
  2. To create an eye mask, help your child cut out a basic mask shape from a sheet of foam. Cut out foam shapes for your child to glue onto the mask with a glue stick.  
  3. Use the glue gun to attach a paper straw to the side of the eye mask as a handle. Only adults should use the glue gun. 
  4. Cut additional foam pieces to create a mouth for the face covering, and glue them in place with the glue gun.  

Now, your child is ready for a fun and healthy Halloween!  

Are you looking for more safe and spooktacular Halloween ideas? Check out this article on the Goddard School blog featuring some fun activities beyond trick-or-treating! 

Tricks, Treats and Spooky Sweets – 10 Creative Ideas for a Physically Distanced Halloween

mom with two toddlers with halloween bucket and decorcations

Halloween is going to look a little different this year as we follow physical distancing practices. Though children may not be trick-or-treating in your community, you can try the creative activities below to get your family into the Halloween spirit.  

  1. Mystery Bowls – Set up a spooky sensory experience for your children by filling bowls with cold spaghetti, grapes, gelatin and more. Blindfold your children and have them guess the foods as they feel them. For each correct guess, give your children a treat, such as pieces of candy, stickers or other fun items. 
  2. Monster Footprints – Cut out monster-shaped footprints from construction paper, and lay them out in a path throughout your house or yard. Have your children go on a monster hunt that leads to a special Halloween treat at the end of the path.  
  3. Ghost Toast – This deliciously spooky recipe is perfect for breakfast or a snack. Use a ghost-shaped cookie cutter to cut out a few pieces of bread, coat one side with butter and cinnamon sugar, and then toast them in the oven. Add miniature chocolate chips to make eyes and a mouth as a finishing touch, and enjoy!  
  4. “Boo” Someone – Help your children spread some Halloween fun! Leave an anonymous ghost-shaped note and a treat for your children telling them that they’ve been “boo-ed” with instructions to pass it on and “boo” three other friends or family members. 
  5. Bat Snacks – This Halloween snack is perfect for little fruit bats! Trace a bat-shaped cookie cutter on a piece of black construction paper, cut the bat shapes out and tape them to the end of wooden skewers. Help your children put cut-up fruit pieces onto the skewer, and enjoy the healthy treat. 
  6. Want My Mummy Game – This is a perfect way to get the whole family involved in Halloween fun! Group your household into two teams, and provide each with a roll of toilet paper. When you say go, each team will wrap a team member up like a mummy. The first team to finish the roll and wrap the mummy wins! 
  7. Monster Mash Freeze Dance – For active little ones, you can turn on the Monster Mash and have them freeze in monster poses whenever the music stops. 
  8. Spider Dance Game – This game is great for developing balance, especially in toddlers. Use painter’s tape to create a spider web on the floor, and sprinkle toy spiders in the holes of the web. Let your children walk on the web and pick up as many spiders as they can without losing their balance and stepping off the lines. 
  9. Halloween Car Parade – Try holding this physically distanced alternative to trunk or treat by coordinating with your neighbors and organizing a special Halloween car parade. Decorate your car, dress your children up in their costumes, buckle them in and drive around your neighborhood so everyone can enjoy the festivities. Take it a step further by organizing a contest with a prize for the best-decorated car! 
  10. Halloween Scavenger Hunt – Create a competition among your friends and family with this spooky scavenger hunt. Have your children dress up and take a family walk around the neighborhood as you take pictures or videos to record what you find from this list: 
  • Pretend spider webs 
  • A graveyard scene 
  • A ghost that looks like it’s flying 
  • A decoration that makes noise 
  • A real haystack 
  • A black cat 
  • Two scary skeletons 
  • A witch’s hat or broom 
  • A Halloween treat 
  • Black and orange lights 
  • A funny costume 
  • Two of the same costume 
  • A scary carved pumpkin 
  • A silly carved pumpkin 
  • A strobe light 
  • A pretend bat 
  • A spooky sign 
  • Something sparkly 
  • Three pieces of candy corn 
  • A skull 

Even though the Halloween celebrations will be physically distanced, your children can still have a blast! 

 

Six Ridiculously Cute Halloween Costumes on Amazon that Won’t Break the Bank

 

Six Ridiculously Cute Halloween Costumes on Amazon that Won’t Break the Bank

Are you looking for a Halloween costume for your child but don’t want to break the bank, or have time to run to the store? We’ve rounded up our top six costumes on Amazon for 2019 for your little one. Trust us, with a few clicks your cart (and heart) will be full after browsing these unique costume options.

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1. Future Golfer: We’ve got a future golfer on our hands. Watch out, Tiger! And yes, the adorable matching hat and golf bag with clubs are included.

mouse

2. Mouse. Stay cute and cozy during a chilly Halloween night of trick-or-treating in this adorable mouse ensemble.

princess

3. Unicorn Princess. Try to refrain your little one from wanting to wear this outfit even after Halloween has passed. Why wouldn’t you want to be a magical unicorn princess every day?

yoda

4. Yoda: Any excuse to go out of the house in a fuzzy robe and large green ears is a win in our book!

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5. A League of Their Own. There’s no crying on Halloween in this timeless costume. The best part is, your whole family can dress up, too. Explore matching costume pieces for men and women.

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6. Pilot: Take your child’s imagination to new heights with this pilot costume and watch their creativity soar!

Banana Ghosts and Clementine Pumpkins

These spooky, healthy snacks are great for serving at your child’s Halloween party, and they make tasty afterschool treats. 

Banana Ghosts 

Ingredients 

  • Bananas 
  • Chocolate chips 
  • Chocolate-covered raisins 

Instructions 

  1. Peel a banana and cut it in half.  
  2. Place it on a plate with the pointed end facing up, and add two chocolate chips to each half for eyes. 
  3. Add a chocolate-covered raisin to each half for a mouth. 
  4. Repeat steps one through three to create a group of tasty ghosts. 

Clementine Pumpkins 

Ingredients 

  • Clementines 
  • Celery 

Instructions 

  1. Peel a clementine.
  2. Cut a small celery stick into one-inch pieces.
  3. Press celery stick into the top of the clementine to create the pumpkin stem. 
  4. Repeat steps one through three to create an entire pumpkin patch. 

Spooky Science Fun

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By Lee Scott

Contributing Writer and Goddard School Educational Advisory Board Member

Fall has certainly arrived, and pumpkins are everywhere. Families are planning costumes for Halloween parties and decorating their homes. We thought it would be fun to provide a couple of spooky science experiments that are easy to do at home in keeping with the “spirit” of the occasion. Children love to get messy, and these hands-on activities will tap into their curiosity while they are learning.

Spooky Volcano – You will need a soda can or bottle, modeling clay, paper, vinegar, dark food coloring, dish soap and baking soda.

  1. Cover the bottle with the paper and the clay. Leave a hole at the top. Let it dry.
  2. Add one cup of vinegar, a few drops of the food coloring and a tablespoon of dish soap to the bottle.
  3. Put a tablespoon of baking soda in a bit of paper towel and push it into the can. The spooky volcano will erupt once the paper breaks down. Spooky!

Magic Images – You’ll need white paper, watercolor paints, paintbrushes and a white crayon.

  1. Your children can draw a scary face or pumpkins on the paper with the crayon.
  2. You can make a few more by drawing a witch or a ghost.
  3. Swap drawings, and have the other person paint over the paper with watercolors.
  4. The scary images will appear!

Ask questions while trying out these experiments.

  • What did we see?
  • What do you think will happen?
  • How can we experiment with the volcano or the paint?
  • What happened in our experiment?

Asking these questions while you experiment will support your children’s scientific-thinking skills.

 

Tips For Having a Safe, Happy and Healthy Halloween

how-to-have-a-safe-healthy-and-happy-halloween

By Jack Maypole, MD
Contributing Writer and Goddard School Educational Advisory Board Member

Soon those goblins, NFL stars, witches and princesses will be trotting up the front walks of the neighborhood to ring doorbells for the goodies within on Halloween. While I suspect that it is far more likely children will get the treat than try a trick, there are some things you can do this year (and every year) to make the holiday a safe and enjoyable one.

For most children, costumes are a chance for joyful creativity and play. Have fun with your expressions but keep some key ideas in mind as you craft your own or grab something at the pop-up store. Check labels, looking for nontoxic makeup (keep it out of those eyes – it stings!) and materials that are clearly noted to be nonflammable.

Materials for those getups should allow the child to see clearly when crossing streets or navigating dark stairs – and to be seen. Finding a way to add reflective material to a treat bag, flashlight or another aspect of the costume is just a good idea. To help them make their way through the gloom of a nearly moonless night (a teensy waxing crescent moon this year), add a glow stick or a flashlight with fresh batteries. Thus equipped, children are ready to go haunting.

For younger children, going out in the late afternoon may be the right move. It prevents the disruption (and derangement) of a missed bedtime. Alternatively, check your local calendar, as many communities are moving toward having child-friendly trick-or-treats in some streets or business districts. For children of preschool or young elementary school age, chaperoning is a must. Depending on your children’s ages and stages, it isn’t a bad idea to quiz them on your phone number (if they know it) or to give them an easy-to-find slip of paper with your phone number on it in case they get lost in the crowds after dark. Hey, it gets crazy out there.

When the bags are full or when the little ones’ feet get tired, it is time to go home and count their booty. I recommend having an adult help the children sort their loot while making a game of it. Count items and put different candies in different piles while a grownup looks for items that might be spoiled, have damaged packaging or potentially be a concern for a child with food allergies. After that, it is a matter of style as to what parents do next. I am agnostic on this part. My dental colleagues mostly object on all counts, and I respect them for that.

Some families subscribe to the “binge now and be done” philosophy, where children live large for the evening, eat their fill and are mostly done with the bounty. Other families might allow a limited indulgence, letting children eat a few choice items and then storing the goods somewhere safe (meaning secret) for their later enjoyment. Whatever your approach, most often children haul in more than they can ever reasonably eat. I recommend setting aside a ration for the child and donating the rest to a worthwhile cause like Operation Gratitude, which sends care packages to our troops.

Keep an eye on the children who eat with gusto, as no one needs a bellyache from overdoing it on All Hallows’ Eve. Happy haunting!

 

Three Simple Ways to Manage Sweets at Home

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What do birthday parties, Halloween and school functions have in common? The answer is food, particularly sweet treats. These events often come with a side of cake, cookies, candy and soda, which are all sugar-rich foods that many families try hard to limit at home.

Try as you might, children eventually find a way to consume them; we’re all born predisposed to desire sweets (De Cosmi, Scaglioni & Agnostoni, 2017).

Restricting foods and labeling them as good or bad can be problematic, but how can you ensure that your children are eating nutritious meals and not gorging themselves on sweets?

1. Change the labels.

There is no such thing as good food or bad food. Repeat this mantra.

Study after study has found that when foods are labeled this way, we respond with detrimental behaviors. Stigmatizing food can lead to eating disorders, shame, secret eating, depression and more (Rollin, 2015).

Jill Castle, a pediatric nutritionist, recommends using the terms “nourishing” and “fun” instead of good and bad or healthy and unhealthy.

Examples of nourishing foods include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and dairy products. Examples of fun foods include fried foods, chips, soda, cake and sugary beverages.

2. Implement the 90-10 rule.

Castle also recommends following the 90-10 rule, meaning 90% of your children’s meals will be nourishing foods and 10% will be fun foods (Castle, 2018). Let your children be part of this process. Explain what fun foods are, then help them identify some.

Only give your children two servings of fun foods a day.

3. Let your children choose.

Allow your children to choose the fun foods they’d like to eat whenever possible. This freedom is hugely important as children seek to exert their independence. Additionally, Castle says that this choice will help teach children how to self-regulate and use their decision-making skills.

Castle says, “The goal is to help your child pause and think through what she will eat during the day, and give her an opportunity to think ahead and practice decision-making skills with eating” (Castle, 2018).

What methods do you use to manage fun foods at home?

References

Castle, J. (2018). The 90-10 rule for managing treats. Retrieved from https://jillcastle.com/childhood-nutrition/fun-food-90-10-rule/

De Cosmi, V., Scaglioni, S. & Agnostoni, C. (2017). Early taste experiences and later food choices. Nutrients, 9(2):107.

Rollin, J. (2015). How the idea of “healthy eating” can be harmful. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/mindful-musings/201512/how-the-idea-healthy-eating-can-be-harmful?destination=node/1082948

Cotton Ball Ghosts Craft

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This simple craft is great for children of all ages. It’s a fun, sensory Halloween experience that only requires a few supplies.

WHAT YOU NEED

* Cotton balls

* Black construction paper

* Chalk

* Glue (glue sticks or regular glue)

* Black buttons (the size found on peacoats)

DIRECTIONS

1. Draw a ghost shape with chalk on the black construction paper. Depending on the age of the children, you may need to draw this for them.

2.  Cover the ghost with glue.

3. Pull and stretch the cotton balls to make them thin and wispy.

4. Place the stretched-out cotton balls on the glue ghost outline. Repeat until the ghost is covered.

5. Glue on two black buttons for eyes and enjoy your spooky ghost art.

What other Halloween crafts do you plan to make with your children?

16 Last-Minute Halloween Costumes for Busy Moms and Kids

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Easy outfits you can create with stuff you probably already have in your home.

Whether your child or you had a change of heart about your initial Halloween attire, or you just haven’t thought about costume ideas until now, no worries—it’s going to be all right. With limited time and supplies, you just need to get creative with what you’ve got. And you know what? Sometimes DIY costumes look better than their in-store equivalents (even if they did only take 10 minutes and a few dollars to make). We’ve gathered 16 adorbs Halloween costume ideas for both your kids and yourself to make last-minute, using clothes and materials you already have at home (well, maybe just a few supplies from your local crafts store).

The Aerobics Instructor

Even your baby can get in on dressing up for Halloween by going as a rad, retro aerobics instructor. So cute! The recipe for this costume is super simple: put your baby’s pants on before putting on the bodysuit, and then add DIY legwarmers and a headband. Make sure, of course, to keep the color scheme fun, neon or bright. To get even more festive, create a felt boombox—it’ll make your already adorable Halloween pics of your baby even better.

You’ll Need:
Neon-colored baby suit or Primary The Baby Suit ($8, or $7 for 3+, primary.com)
Neon-colored babypants or Primary The Babypants ($10, or $9 each for 3+, primary.com)
Headband
Old socks to be cut into leg warmers
Scissors

Directions:
For the headband: Any soft headband will work here. Fun colors and patterns are the best!

For the legwarmers: Cut the feet off of old socks for instant baby leg warmers.

Pro tip: Make sure the baby pants are UNDER the babysuit for the full effect!

To dress up your kid or yourself, wear a tank or t-shirt in a neon color and shorts layered over funky patterned leggings. Complete the look with legwarmers created from old socks, a headband and sneakers.

The Scarecrow

 

Scarecrow Halloween Costume

 

Dressing up as a scarecrow never fails.

Photo: iStock

Scarecrows are supposed to be frightening, but on Halloween, they’re totally cute! For this unisex costume that works for adults or kids, pair jeans with a flannel plaid button down, boots and a floppy hat. Tie a bandana around the neck, draw on some scarecrow makeup, and, if you can, have cornhusks stick out from your hat, sleeves and jeans.

You’ll Need:
Plaid shirt
Jeans
Boots
Floppy hat
Corn husks
Black eyeliner

Rosie the Riveter

 

Rosie the Riveter Halloween Costume

 

Girl power!

Photo: iStock

To represent this cultural icon on Halloween, it’s all about the blue button down (chambray, preferred, and with sleeves rolled up) paired with black or denim pants and work boots. Then tie a small red bandana or red and white polka dot scarf around your head like a headband. The finishing touch: a swipe of bright red lipstick. And don’t forget to flex those muscles for every photo op!

You’ll Need:
Chambray or denim button down
Black pants
Work boots
Red scarf
Red lipstick

The Crayons

 

Primary Crayons Halloween Costume

 

For a group costume, have every person in your family dress up as a different colored crayon.

Courtesy of Primary

Here’s another costume idea requiring clothes you can easily use for another purpose outside of Halloween, or clothes your kid already has in his closet. All you have to do is create a hat and anklet.

You’ll Need:
Regular long sleeve solid-colored pajama top or Primary The Long Sleeve PJ Top ($12, or $11 each for 3+, primary.com)
Regular solid-colored pajama bottom or Primary The PJ Pant ($12 or $11 each for 3+, primary.com)
Sturdy paper to match the PJs
Scissors
Ribbon in color matching the PJs (about 40 inches)
Glue Black felt (long enough to wrap around both ankles)
Double-sided fabric tape

Directions:
For the hat: Find sturdy paper the same color as your PJs and form a cone. Trim the top of the cone to create a blunt, flat top. Cut out a circle for the brim of the crayon and place it over the cone and trace cone in the center. Cut out the center circle, leaving a ring that will become the brim. In the opening of the cone, make a series of 1-inch cuts around the open edge of the cone and fold them outward to create tabs. Fit the brim ring over the top of the cone and attach the tabs to the brim using glue or tape. Cut a series of 1-inch strips of paper and join them to make one long strip. Wrap the strip around the brim of the hat and use a few pieces of masking tape to fit it snugly. Then glue the seam together and allow to dry completely before removing the tape. Finally, glue two ribbons (about 20 inches on each side of the brim) to tie under the neck.

For the anklets: Cut a zig-zag pattern out of a strip of black felt and attach to ankles using double-sided fabric tape.

The Skeleton

 

Fiskars Halloween Skeleton Costume

 

If there’s time, draw skeleton makeup on your child’s face, or buy a skeleton mask.

Courtesy of Fiskars

Does your kid have an old black shirt your kid he never wears anymore? Flip it inside out, and use it to create this creepy skeleton costume. Be aware though: you’re going to have to cut it up!

You’ll Need:
Fiskars RazorEdge™ Easy Action™ Fabric Shears for Tabletop Cutting or other scissors
Black t-shirt
White t-shirt
Marker
Freezer paper

Directions:
Trim a piece of freezer paper to approximately the size of the front of the black t-shirt. Use a marker to draw a rib cage design on the freezer paper and iron it to the front of the black t-shirt. Use the shears to carefully cut out the rib cage design. Cut through the fabric of the t-shirt and the freezer paper together. Remove the freezer paper. Wear the cut black t-shirt with a white t-shirt underneath for a quick spooky homemade costume idea. Add any skeleton mask for added eeriness.

Audrey Hepburn

 

Audrey Hepburn Halloween Costume

 

To make yourself look even more like Audrey, fill in and define your brows with brow powder or pencil.

Photo: iStock

For this elegant retro look, now is the time to bust out your favorite little black dress and pearl necklaces so you resemble Audrey Hepburn’s character Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Put your hair in a bun, wear heels, add some long black gloves, and you’re done.

You’ll Need:
Little black dress
Black heels
Long black gloves
Pearl necklace
Optional: Tiara

The Clown

 

Primary Halloween Clown Costume

 

Bright red wig not required.

Courtesy of Primary

Dress up PJs in with pom-poms and a paper collar for a fun and cute kid’s clown costume.

You’ll Need:
Solid-colored long sleeve pajama top or Primary The Long Sleeve PJ Top ($12, or $11 each for 3+, primary.com)
Solid-colored pajama pant or Primary the PJ Pant ($12, or $11 each for 3+, primary.com)
Sturdy cardstock
Pom-poms
Scissors
Glue
Double-sided fabric tape
Optional: clown nose and clown makeup

Directions:
For the hat: Glue a pom-pom on top of a simple paper party hat. Easy peasy.

For the collar: Use sturdy cardstock to fold into a fan and attach it to a paper collar, measured for the child’s neck. Secure the collar with sturdy tape or a paper clip.

For the clown suit: Use double-sided fabric tape to attach two or three big pom-poms down the torso.

The Ballerina

 

Halloween the Leotard Boutique Ballerina Costume

 

Adding glitter is totally optional.

Courtesy of the Leotard Boutique

For this kid costume, you can use an actual leotard and tutu, or substitute in a short-sleeve top and flutter skirt. Add in tights and ballet flats, put your kid’s hair in a bun, and you’re good to go.

You’ll Need
Pastel-colored short sleeve top or The Leotard Boutique Short Sleeve Leotard ($15, theleotardboutique.com) Tutu skirt or The Leotard Boutique Flutter Ballet Dance Skirt ($13, theleotardboutique.com)
Tights
Ballet flats

The Unicorn

 

Primary Halloween Unicorn Costume

 

Again, glittery is totally optional, but very preferred.

Courtesy of Primary

What child doesn’t own a hoodie and pj pants? The key here is choosing a pastel color for these pieces that’s reminiscent of the shades you’d find in My Little Pony—and of course, DIYing a horn, ears, mane and tail.

You’ll Need:
Plain, pastel-colored hoodie or Primary The New Hoodie ($20, or $18 each for 3+, primary.com)
Plain, pastel-colored pants or Primary The PJ Pant ($12, or $11 each for 3+, primary.com)
White felt
Pink felt
Gold metallic cord
Headband
Glue gun
Scissors

Directions:
For the horn and ears: With white felt, create a tall cone, then wrap it in gold metallic cord and hot glue it to the cone. Cut a small circle of white felt and glue to the bottom of the cone to close the hole. Tape or glue the horn to a headband. Next, cut 2 large tear-drop shapes from the white felt and 2 smaller tear-drop shapes from the pink felt. Glue the pink felt on top of the white felt, then use a drop of hot glue and pinch the bottoms together creating an ear shape. Add the ears to the headband on either side.

For the mane: Cut 1×4 inch strips of white felt and adhere in a straight line down the center, from tip of the hood down to the hem.

For the tail: Cut a handful of 1×10 inch strips of white felt for the tail. Knot them together and adhere to the seat with a safety pin.

The Witch

 

Witch Costume for Halloween

 

The Halloween costume that never goes out of style.

Photo: iStock

Ahh—one of the most classic costumes of all: the witch. For this extremely simple costume, all you have to do is buy a witch hat, wear all black, put on some very dark red lipstick, and call it a day.

You’ll Need:
Witch hat
Head-to-toe black clothing
Optional: dark lipstick, broom

Bubbles

 

DIY bubble costume

 

Just make sure your kid is careful wearing this costume!

primary.com

Your child will get all the fun of a bubble bath, minus the soapy suds with this quick-to-make Halloween costume. Add some toys from your bathtub at home and you’re done!

You’ll Need:
Plain white long sleeve shirt or Primary The Long Sleeve Pajama Top ($12, primary.com)
Plain white leggings or Primary The Legging ($14, $13 each for 3+, primary.com)
Plain white shower cap
White balloons
Clear balloons
Bath toys or a rubber duck
Tape or safety pins

Directions:
Blow up enough white and clear balloons to cover the shirt. Tie the balloons closed securely, and use safety pins or tape to attach the balloons to the shirt. Attach the mix of white and clear balloons randomly to the shirt to look like suds.

The Cat

 

Cat face paint

 

Another Halloween outfit idea that’s classic.

iStock

Meow! No one can resist an adorable cat on Halloween. This look requires stuff you already have at home, allowing you to put this costume together in record time.

You’ll Need:
An all-black outfit
Black face paint or black eyeliner
Optional: cat-ear headband

Directions
Using the face paint or eyeliner, draw a nose and whiskers on your child’s face. Add the optional cat-ear headband and you’re set!

The Mummy

 

Mummy costume

 

For a secure fit, strategically add safety pins.

iStock

Halloween is the perfect time to dress up as the living dead—especially if the costume is as easy to make as this one!

You’ll need:
A plain white bed sheet or a yard of plain white fabric
An all-white outfit
Scissors
Optional: Coffee or tea water and large pot or container

Directions:
Cut the white sheet or fabric into long strips. If you and your child want an older-looking mummy costume, use coffee or tea water. Make the colored water by either brewing coffee and watering it down to the desired shade of brown or by using tea to do the same. Then put the liquid in a large pot or container and soak the strips for about two hours. Rinse the strips and let them air dry. Once the strips are done, simply tie them one-by-one around your child, attaching the end of one strip to the beginning of another.

The Nerd

 

Nerd.

 

You can also apply gel to flatten your child’s hairstyle for geek-chic effect.

iStock

Hey, who said being smart wasn’t cool? This DIY nerd costume will bring out the brainiac in any kid, and the best part is, you probably have all the materials already.

You’ll Need:
Glasses with or without lenses
Sweater Vest
Dress pants
Bow tie
Optional: math or science textbook; pencil

Pro Tip: The 3D glasses you took home from the movies make for awesome nerd glasses! Tuck a pencil behind your child’s ear for an added smarty-pants effect.

Emoji

 

Emoji Costume

 

Add another expression to the back of your emoji, so you can “change moods” throughout the day.

Photo: iStock

We all know and love emojis, so why not honor them on Halloween too? Cut out a large circle from poster board, paint it yellow, and paint on some expressions. To make carrying it around easier, glue a paint stirrer to the back to create a handle. You can wear it with yellow clothing to further emphasize your costume.

You’ll Need:
Poster board
Yellow, black, brown or blue paint (depending on the expression)
Scissors Paint brush Optional: paint stirrer

Mime Costume

 

Mime Costume

 

You can add a beret if you want to go more traditional.

Photo: iStock

Pair a black-and-white striped shirt with black pants, and then put white face paint all over your face. Apply black eyeliner to eyelids, and use the eyeliner to draw thin lines for brows. Finish with a coat of bright red lipstick.

You’ll Need:
Black-and-white striped shirt
Black pants
White face paint Bright red lipstick Optional: striped or red scarf, white gloves

Updated on

October 17th, 2018 at 10:30am

This article was written by Maricar Santos from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Pumpkin Lanterns! Skeleton Flamingos! Here Are the Top Decor Trends for Halloween

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Time to scoop up some pumpkins and bust out ye olde witch garb, friends: All Hallows’ Eve is comin’ up fast. Looking for some spooky inspiration for this year’s decor? Below, the freshest, most-buzzed-about Halloween hooks—according to Pinterest’s 2018 Pinfrights report.

Courtesy of Polka Dot Chair

FLOATING WITCH HAT LIGHTS

We love this one: Use a fishing line and LED clip-on lights to turn witches hats into front porch phantoms.

Get the tutorial on Polka Dot Chair

Courtesy of Modern Parents, Messy Kids

Spider Eggs

This yarn, glue and water project couldn’t be simpler. (We love the idea of filling a cauldron with them—or suspending from a lighting fixture.)

Get the tutorial on Modern Parents Messy Kids

PHOTO: GIEVES ANDERSON/STYLING: REBEKAH MACKAY

Drip candlestick holders

Psst: These chic vessels will get eerier and eerier as the wax melts down.

Get the tutorial on PureWow

Courtesy of Melo-Drama

Skeleton flamingos

Skeletons are spooky—but we think these little flamingo versions are pretty darn cute.

Get the tutorial on Melo-Drama

Courtesy of Design Love Fest

Pumpkin lanterns

The prettiest and most festive of DIYs: Drill bit, pumpkins, done.

Get the tutorial on Design Love Fest

 

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