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Posts Tagged ‘Halloween’

Encourage Imagination during Halloween

Halloween is the perfect time for your children to go above and beyond with their imaginations. Here are a few ways to help them express themselves.

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  1. Ask your children to create mysterious potions with items found in your kitchen. While the potions are brewing, encourage them to come up with spells that the potions will produce and ask them to elaborate on the outcome of taking the potions.
  2. Inspire your children to dress up as anything they want to be. Try to make them think outside the box. Share some of your favorite old costumes to help them get started.
  3. Create a spooky story with your children. You can begin by starting a sentence and asking them to finish it. You’ll be amazed where their minds will take them. Don’t forget to write the story down for lasting memories. For example, “As I was trick-or-treating on Halloween night, I heard a rustling in the bushes and …”
  4. Bake cookies in the shape of a pumpkin and ask your children to use their artistic skills and imagination to decorate them as a pumpkin family. Ask your children to tell you about each pumpkin family member in the process. You can use bat or ghost cookies for this activity

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What are some of your favorite costumes that your children have worn or will wear for Halloween?

Pumpkin Carving Party

The days are chilly, the leaves are changing and fall is in the air.

A pumpkin carving party is a great way to gather your community together. Bring your own pumpkin (BYOP)!

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Invite families in your community to get slimy with pumpkin goop, spooky with spider webs and creative with jack-o-lanterns.

Decorate your yard or block with fun Halloween decorations and watch this magical land come to life. Your little ones will love getting together with other children in the community.

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Halloween Treats: Spider Snacks!

Looking for a spooktacular twist for your child’s Halloween snack? Try these tasty spider snacks!Spider Snacks 2

Ingredients:

  • Crackers
  • Cream Cheese
  • Pretzel Sticks
  • Candy-coated chocolates
  1. Spread cream cheese on a cracker.
  2. Break  pretzel sticks in half and use as legs on each side of the cracker (two per side).
  3. Use small candy-coated chocolates for eyes and place on the cream cheese.
  4. Enjoy!

Easy Halloween S’mores

S’mores are a delicious treat but they usually require a campfire. These simple s’mores can be made without a campfire and are just as yummy!

Ingredients:

  • Graham crackers
  • Chocolate-hazelnut spread
  • Marshmallow crème
  • Black and orange nonpareils

Spread four graham cracker squares with chocolate-hazelnut spread, and spread fourgraham_crackers graham cracker squares with marshmallow crème. Pair off the marshmallow and chocolate-hazelnut squares and sandwich them together. Place them on a microwave-safe plate and microwave them, uncovered, on high for 30 seconds. Once they’re nice and warm, sprinkle the gooey edges in black and orange nonpareils. Then enjoy!

You can also try a peanut butter variation – just use chocolate graham cracker squares instead of traditional ones, and use peanut butter instead of chocolate-hazelnut spread.

Un-Scary Halloween Costume Ideas

 

Goddard School - Fire Fighter

Halloween for preschoolers should be light and upbeat, not scary. If you plan to celebrate with your little ones, either with trick-or-treating or a party, here are some fun and simple costumes to consider.

  • Superhero – All you need is a long-sleeved t-shirt, a colored hand towel or a rectangle of fabric for a cape; leggings or fitted pants; and felt for making an eye mask, headband and symbol cutout of your children’s choice. They can pick a superhero from a favorite movie or television show, or they can make up their own.
  • Hula Dancers – You will need a grass skirt bought from your local party store or made from the heads of rope mops. You will also need a lei from the party store, or you can make one from fake flowers purchased at the craft store.  Add leggings, fitted pants or tights, too. A toy ukulele can also make a fun prop.
  • Monster Truck – If you have a child who loves trucks, you can make a truck costume with cardboard boxes, some careful cuts (by a parent, of course) and some paint or markers. You will need to add some shoulder straps to the ‘truck’ to make sure your child is properly buckled (and can easily carry it).
  • It’s Raining Cats and Dogs – Most of us have an umbrella, children’s raincoat and rain boots handy at home.  Many of us have some stuffed dogs and cats at home, too. Have your child pick out which stuffed dogs and cats to use, and then you can attach them to the top of a sturdy, inexpensive umbrella with string or safety pins.

The options for fun costumes are endless. If you have other options for easy, fun Halloween costumes, share them with us here or on our Facebook Page at https://www.Facebook.com/GoddardSchool.

 

Mummy-Dogs, Halloweenies and Witch Eyes

Looking for a spooktacular twist for your child’s Halloween lunch?

  • Wrap precooked hot dogs in thin strips of canned roll dough and bake until golden brown for yummy Mummy-Dogs. For a healthier twist, try turkey or tofu dogs!
  • Slice veggie dogs, put in a mini-pita pocket with colorful matchstick veggies and add sweet and sour or BBQ sauce for a delicious Halloweenies sandwich!
  • Whip up devilishly delicious deviled eggs. Top with a round slice of black olive. Serve two egg halves side-by-side for protein-packed Witch Eyes.

Common Preschool Halloween Mistakes

As a child psychiatrist, school consultant, father and grandfather, I’ve seen a lot of All Hallows’ Eve’s involving preschool children – more unsuccessful than not. I’ve come to the conclusion that successful Halloween experiences contain the same traits: the children are old enough, the celebration is short, too much candy is avoided and it isn’t scary.

Parents intend to delight – and delight in – their preschool child’s playful participation in this fall ritual. But less is more when it comes to keeping a preschooler comfortable and entertained. Here are some guidelines:

Age

Halloween is really meant for school-age kids and adults who have no trouble telling fantasy from reality and whom are way past being afraid of the dark and of scary masks. The preschooler is less likely to laugh and more likely to anxiously ask the mask-wearer a question – cute, but neither funny nor entertaining.

Length

Tying Halloween into dinner plans often stretches the evening out beyond your preschooler’s stamina, making all the other strange stuff inherent to the event harder to manage and understand. Plan to stick to your routine, and celebrate well before bedtime so your preschooler has a chance to settle down.

Sweets

Candy is the antithesis of your normal bedtime snack, giving your child a sugar rush. So, keep them away from the candy bowl. You may want to reconsider having them stay home to ‘help hand out the treats,’ tempting though it may be to have them ‘safe’ with you at your own front door.

Scariness

Because the preschool mind is just mastering the difference between reality and fantasy, things that slip back and forth over the edge of that distinction – like Halloween itself – aren’t very comfortable training grounds for this kind of learning. Older children can see the joy in being scared because they understand the difference. A preschooler is not quite ready for this kind of ‘fun.’

For your young ones, then, I suggest you make it a dress-up party without the gore, leave the trick or treating to the grade school professionals, check your favorite parents magazine/Web site for some simple games to play with peers and get them to bed at a reasonable time. Giving them and yourself a few more years to get ready for the delightful weirdness will be deeply appreciated by them and you.