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Posts Tagged ‘healthy food’

7 Healthy Lunches Your Kids Will Actually Eat (That Aren’t PB&J)

Truth: Your kids are just as sick of eating the same old turkey-and-cucumber sandwich as you are of making it. Win the Best Mom Ever award and pack some of these exciting but totally practical (read: neat, portable and edible at room temp) lunch-box goodies instead. BLT pasta salad FTW.

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Rainbow Collard Wraps with Peanut Butter Dipping Sauce

Finally, a sandwich you can make ahead (because it won’t get soggy).

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

BLT Pasta Salad

It’s impossible to resist this crunchy-and-creamy combo.

Get the recipe

 

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Italian Deli Pinwheel Sandwiches

Anything but a sad lunch wrap.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Greek Yogurt Chicken Salad Stuffed Peppers

Your kiddo will devour these healthy, colorful boats.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Mini Chicken Shawarma

Tip: Wrap these guys up in waxed paper to keep them extra fresh.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Lunch Kebabs with Mortadella, Artichoke and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

Psst: Your little ones can totally help assemble these the night before.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Vegetarian Sushi Cups

Finger food is the best food.

Get the recipe

 

This article was from PureWow and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

10 Super Quick, Super Healthy Kid-Friendly Dinners

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Easy recipes to get your whole family eating well.

Eating well should not be an unattainable fantasy for you and your family. These recipes from the Trim Healthy Table cookbook take the traditional meals you and your family already love, and make them healthier. They will help you reach your goal of staying fit as well as improve the overall well-being of your family. Never assume you are too busy to make health a priority. The tips and tricks in these meals make it simple, and help you take baby steps to living a healthier lifestyle.

Deconstructed Fajitas

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

This is such a quick no-brainer for busy nights when you need dinner on the table in ten minutes. We enjoy this on dinner plates over a bunch of cut lettuce, but if you prefer you can stuff into low-carb tortillas.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons coconut oil or butter 1 large onion and 2 to 3 green or red peppers, sliced
4 to 6 cups sliced precooked chicken breast
2 teaspoons chili powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional for heat lovers)

1 teaspoon Mineral Salt
1 teaspoon paprika (smoked or regular)
2 fresh tomatoes, sliced, or 1 (14.5-ounce) can diced, re-roasted tomatoes, drained Lots of cut lettuce (e.g., a couple hearts of romaine at least) 
Greek yogurt Sour cream
 Sliced avocado Grated cheese Brown rice or quinoa

Directions

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add the coconut oil. Add the peppers and onions, tossing frequently for a few minutes until they begin to soften. Add the chicken, sprinkle on the chili powder, onion powder, cumin, cayenne (if using), salt, and paprika, and toss with the veggies for a couple more minutes. Add the tomatoes. Cook for 2 to 3 more minutes.

  2. Serve on generous beds of lettuce and add toppings according to which fuel you decide on.

Black Pepper Chicken

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Who wouldn’t love healthy Chinese takeout?

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

Think Chinese takeout, but ultra-healthy and made in a jiffy! Here’s a time-saving tip—the night before, or the morning of, you can put the chicken in the marinade in a gallon-size baggie and refrigerate so it is all ready to go right before dinnertime. While you are at it, you may want to make double the amount of chicken and marinade. Put one of the bags in the freezer for a no-think, no-fuss dinner another night.

Ingredients

2 1⁄2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts or thighs, thawed if frozen, cut into 1⁄2-inch pieces (easily done with kitchen scissors)
1⁄4 cup plus 2 tablespoons soy sauce
1⁄2 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon garlic powder
21⁄2 teaspoons black pepper, or
 3 teaspoons if you like more heat
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
4 tablespoons coconut oil

1 onion, sliced
 6 celery stalks, finely sliced

1⁄2 large head cabbage, finely sliced, or 1 (16-ounce) bag pre-sliced cabbage or coleslaw

Directions

  1. Place the chicken pieces in a bowl and add 1⁄4 cup of the soy sauce, the ginger, onion powder, garlic powder, pepper, and vinegar. Allow to marinate for 10 minutes or so while you chop the vegetables (or do as described above and start marinating the night before or in the morning).

  2. Melt 2 tablespoons of the coconut oil in a large skillet over high heat. Once hot, add the marinated chicken. Allow the chicken to cook for a couple minutes on one side, then toss periodically in the hot oil for 3 to 4 more minutes or until just done. Transfer the chicken to a plate.

  3. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons coconut oil and all the veggies to the skillet. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce and toss the veggies for 3 to 4 minutes, or until slightly wilted but still a bit crispy. Return the chicken to the pan, toss through and serve.

World’s Laziest Lasagna Skillet

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Any recipe with ‘lazy’ in the title is bound to be perfect for busy weeknights.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half)

We gave you Lazy Lasagna, one of the most popular recipes in Trim Healthy Mama cookbook, but now we have an even lazier version. No baking time—just throw it all in your skillet, then scoop into your mouth. Kids love this, too, and it makes sure they get a good dose of healthy greens in their dinner!

Ingredients

2 pounds ground beef, turkey, or venison, thawed if frozen
20 ounces no-sugar-added pizza or spaghetti sauce
11⁄2 tablespoons dried oregano
1⁄2 teaspoon Mineral Salt

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon garlic powder
1⁄8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 to 2 doonks Pure Stevia Extract Powder
16 ounces fresh spinach

1 (8-ounce) package 1⁄3 less fat cream cheese

1 (14-ounce) container 1% cottage cheese

8 ounces part-skim mozzarella cheese, grated

Directions

  1. Brown the meat in a large skillet over medium-high heat, then drain off any excess fat.

  2. Add the pizza sauce, oregano, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne, and stevia powder (if using). Add the spinach (you may need to add half the spinach, stir until it wilts a little, then add the rest). Reduce the heat to medium-low and allow to simmer.

  3. Place the cream cheese and cottage cheese in a food processor and process until smooth. Add to the skillet. Allow all the ingredients to simmer a few more minutes, then you’re done.

  4. Top each plate with grated mozzarella.

Sesame Lo Mein

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Carbs you can feel good about.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, but do not freeze, as Konjac noodles don’t freeze well.)

Load your plate high with scrumptious noodles and slim down! Bet nobody has told you that before. Before you even have time to make a phone call for Chinese takeout, you can have this deliciousness ready for your table within 15 to 20 minutes. You’ll save time and you’ll save your waistline! We use two kinds of noodles in this dish for double the slimming power. It has konjac-based noodles, which are so fat-blasting and wonderful, and zucchini or yellow squash noodles, which we call “Troodles.” If you are not yet a fan of konjac-based noodles, you can use all Troodles, just double up on the zucchini.

Ingredients

2 teaspoons butter or coconut oil
3 to 4 garlic cloves, minced

2 cups of any chopped veggies you have lying around such as onion, red bell peppers, zucchini, radishes, and carrots; you can also include a few tablespoons frozen peas
3 single-serve bags konjac noodles, such as our Trim Healthy Noodles or Not Naughty Noodles, well rinsed and drained
1 to 2 tablespoons Nutritional Yeast (optional)
1⁄4 cup soy sauce, or a few good squirts Bragg liquid aminos or coconut aminos
Red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper to taste
2 to 4 medium zucchini or yellow squash, spiralized into Troodles (zucchini noodles)
4 large eggs
2 to 3 cups precooked or canned meat, such as diced chicken breast, salmon, or ground meat
3 to 4 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
3 to 4 green onions (optional), diced

Directions

  1. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and toss in the butter for about a minute. Add the seasoning blend or chopped veggies and toss for another 2 to 3 minutes, or until softened. If using frozen veggies, toss on high.

  2. Add the Trim Healthy Noodles or Not Naughty Noodles to the pan, increase the heat to high, and stir with a fork as they cook. While they are cooking, add the nutritional yeast (if using), soy sauce, and red pepper flakes. Toss them over high heat for a couple minutes, then add the Troodles and allow to cook for few minutes, tossing well. At first you think there are too many Troodles … have faith, they will wilt.

  3. Push the noodles and veggies to one side of your skillet. Reduce the heat to medium and crack the eggs into the skillet. Stir and cut the eggs with your spatula, flip a few times while they cook, then toss them with all the other ingredients in the skillet. Add your precooked protein, continuing to heat the ingredients until the meat is warmed through. Top with the sesame oil and green onions (if using). Stir and lift the noodles so that they get coated with the sesame oil. Taste, then add more soy sauce, pepper, or other favorite Asian seasoning until it makes you say “Yeah Baby!”

Chicken, Broccoli, Mushroom Stir-Fry

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Make your life easier by preparing the sauce in advance.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

Your house will smell as wondrous as a Japanese restaurant when you make this. Watch your family wolf it down, never knowing there is a healthy secret ingredient in the sauce (so long as you don’t tell!).

Ingredients

1 cup chicken broth

1 cup frozen diced okra

1⁄3 cup soy sauce, or several generous squirts Bragg liquid aminos

21⁄2 teaspoons Pure Stevia Extract Powder
1⁄2 teaspoon Gluccie
2 tablespoons coconut oil or sesame oil

21⁄2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts (thawed if frozen), cut into 1⁄2-inch pieces (quickest with kitchen scissors)
Mineral Salt and black pepper

3 to 4 garlic cloves, minced

1 generous teaspoon finely grated or minced fresh ginger

2 (12-ounce) bags frozen broccoli, or fresh broccoli florets from a large head

8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)

Directions

  1. Prepare the sauce in advance. Put the chicken broth, okra, soy sauce, sweetener, and Gluccie in a blender and blend on high until completely broken down … we mean blend the daylights out of it so no bits of okra are left.

  2. Melt 1 tablespoon of the oil in a skillet over high heat. Season the chicken pieces with salt and pepper, add them to the skillet, and cook for 4 minutes, turning once. Remove them from the pan and set aside.

  3. Reduce the heat to medium. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, the garlic and ginger. Toss in the oil for about 30 seconds, then stir in the frozen broccoli. Increase the heat to medium-high, cover, and cook for about 2 1⁄2 minutes. Stir in the mushrooms, cover, and cook for another 21⁄2 minutes (if using fresh broccoli, add later with the mushrooms and cook without covering for several minutes, tossing often).

  4. Uncover, pour in the sauce, and cook on high for 5 to 6 more minutes, returning the chicken for the last 3 minutes and adding the pepper flakes (if using).

Save My Sanity Chili

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

It’s all in the title of the recipe.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

When life gets chaotic, this meal can come to your rescue. Throw it in the crockpot in the morning and you’ll be able to breathe a sigh of relief knowing that supper is taken care of (or make it in a jiffy in your pressure cooker). This tasty chili is a no-brainer since it saves you a whole prep step. Most chili recipes that call for ground meat ask you to brown the meat and onions first, but we know life can be crazy busy and sometimes that just might be the 10 to 15 minutes you don’t have! We don’t want you giving in and considering picking up drive-thru food because you don’t have time to cook. So no more excuses—extra steps are outta here! Throw all the ingredients in your trusty crockpot and come back in the evening to deliciousness! Now, let’s say your life is extra crazy and you forget to prepare your crockpot meal in the morning but you don’t have an electric pressure cooker. No worries—this can be made in a pot on the stove in about 30 minutes—just brown your meat and onions, add all the other ingredients, and let it bubble away.

Ingredients

2 pounds ultra-lean (96%) ground turkey or venison, thawed if frozen
2 (10- to 12-ounce) bags frozen small-cut vegetables, such as green and red bell peppers
2 (14.5-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
1 (10-ounce) can Rotel-style diced tomatoes and green chilies (hot, medium, or mild)

2 (15-ounce) cans pinto beans, rinsed and drained

2 (15-ounce) cans white beans, such as cannellini or Great Northern, rinsed and drained

1 quart chicken broth

3 tablespoons chili powder

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 teaspoon dried oregano

11⁄2 teaspoons Mineral Salt

1⁄4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional, depending on your heat preference)

Directions

  1. Place the meat in the bottom of a crockpot and break up with a fork to spread around the bottom of the crock. Add all the other ingredients and mix well.

  2. Cover and cook on low for 5 to 7 hours. Once the chili is ready, break up any larger chunks of meat.

ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER DIRECTIONS: Cook the meat on sauté mode, then add all the other ingredients. Seal and cook at low pressure for 10 minutes. Use the quick pressure release.

Slow Cooker Buffalo Chicken

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Original Frank’s hot sauce tastes delicious on anything and everything.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

This is flavorful, hearty and so versatile! Please don’t be scared if you are not a spice lover. Just be sure to buy the original Frank’s hot sauce, not the “hot” kind. And if you’re still timid, pull back the amount of sauce to 1 or even 1⁄2 cup. That will give you a very mild heat level but still lots of flavor.

Ingredients

21⁄2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts or thighs, thawed if frozen
4 tablespoons (1⁄2 stick) butter

11⁄4 cups Frank’s original hot sauce (reduce if you don’t like heat)
1 (10- to 12-ounce) bag frozen small-cut veggies
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 teaspoons dried parsley flakes

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1⁄2 teaspoon garlic powder

1⁄2 teaspoon onion powder

1⁄2 teaspoon Mineral Salt

1⁄2 teaspoon black pepper

1⁄2 cup sour cream (optional)

Directions

  1. Put the seasoning blend at the bottom of a slow cooker. Add all the other ingredients except for the sour cream. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours. Shred the chicken with 2 forks (it will fall apart easily). If using sour cream, stir it in well.

ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER DIRECTIONS: Add all the ingredients except the sour cream to a pressure cooker. Seal and cook at high pressure for 12 minutes. Use natural pressure release for at least 10 minutes, followed by quick pressure release. Stir in the sour cream and shred the chicken.

NOTE: When wrapping or stuffing this into lettuce or tortillas, use a slotted spoon or tongs to remove the chicken from the slow cooker and try not to get too much of the broth so it won’t be too messy.

Succulent Barbacoa Beef

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Bring Chipotle-style bowls to your kitchen table.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, or make full and freeze half.)

We love Chipotle restaurants—so easy to stay on plan there using their bowl option. We love ordering their barbacoa beef or chicken, including the sautéed veggies, and putting it all over lettuce and salsa, then topping with lots of guac and a sprinkle of cheese. Mmmm … Amazing! Or sometimes we add some brown rice and beans. You can make something similar to their succulent beef (our very favorite menu item there) at home. Here is our version.

Ingredients

2 1⁄2 to 3 pounds beef chuck roast, cut into thirds
1 onion, cut into chunks

1 to 3 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce from a can (using 3 is lovely and spicy, but if you don’t like a whole lot of spice, pull back to 1 or 2 and rinse the sauce off a little)
4 to 6 garlic cloves, minced
2 to 3 tablespoons lime juice (fresh or bottled)

3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
3⁄4 cup water or beef broth

1 tablespoon ground cumin

2 teaspoons dried oregano

11⁄2 teaspoons Mineral Salt

1 teaspoon black pepper

Directions

  1. Place the beef in the bottom of a slow cooker. Put all the other ingredients in a blender and blend well. Pour the contents of the blender over the beef. Cover and cook on low for 7 to 8 hours. Break the beef apart once cooked … you don’t have to completely shred, but pulling most of it apart allows it to drink up all the delicious juices.

ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER DIRECTIONS: Coat the pressure cooker pot with coconut oil spray and place all the ingredients in the pot, including the blended sauce. Seal and cook at high pressure for 50 minutes. Use natural pressure release.

Cheesy Chicken Spaghetti Casserole

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

Cheesy noodles without the fat.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 to 8 (Halve if your family is smaller, but do not freeze, as Konjac noodles don’t freeze well.)

This is ooey-gooey, noodley, cheesy goodness. Regular white noodles when mixed with cheese are one of the most fattening and health-destroying foods on this planet. Konjac noodles, such as our Trim Healthy or Not Naughty noodles, allow you to enjoy that oh-so-magnificent combination of cheese and noodles without widening your waistline.

Ingredients

4 single-serve bags of konjac noddles, such as out Trim Healthy Noodles or Not Naughty Noodles, well rinsed and drained
5 cups diced cooked chicken breast, or diced rotisserie chicken
1 (10-ounce can) Rotel-style diced tomatoes and green chilies, drained
11⁄2 (8-ounce) packages 1⁄3 less fat cream cheese
1⁄2 cup chicken broth

11⁄2 teaspoons Mineral Salt

1⁄2 teaspoon black pepper

1 teaspoon paprika

1 teaspoon chili powder

1⁄2 teaspoon onion powder

1⁄2 teaspoon garlic powder

3 cups (12 ounces) grated cheddar cheese

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

  2. Snip the noodles a bit smaller with kitchen scissors so they are not too terribly long. Put the diced chicken, noodles, and diced tomatoes and chilies in a 9 × 13-inch baking dish.

  3. Put the cream cheese, broth, salt, pepper, paprika, chili powder, onion powder, and garlic powder in a blender and blend until smooth. Scrape the mixture into the baking dish using a spatula. Mix in 2 cups of the cheddar. Top with the remaining cheddar and bake for 30 to 35 minutes. Broil for just a couple minutes at the end to make sure all the cheese is golden brown and bubbling, but watch it doesn’t burn.

Flaky Parmesan Tilapia

 

Quick, Healthy, Kid-friendly Dinners

 

An inexpensive way to try something new with your family.

Trim Healthy Table

Feeds 6 To 8 (Halve if your family is smaller)

This is a quick and easy way to include more fish in your life. There is only so much chicken and red meat you can eat, so please make room for fish! It is a wonderful, slimming part of a balanced-protein approach. This recipe is incredibly flaky and full of flavor, and it’s a great way to get your children to start liking fish. It need not be expensive, either. You can buy 2 pounds of frozen tilapia fillets from any landlocked grocery store inexpensively and thaw them before cooking. If you don’t like the idea of using tilapia, use any other thin white fish of your liking.

Ingredients

2 pounds tilapia or other thin white fish fillets, thawed if frozen
4 tablespoons (1⁄2 stick) butter, melted
Black pepper

Red pepper flakes (optional)

3⁄4 cup grated Parmesan cheese 

1⁄4 cup mayonnaise

2 heaping tablespoons Greek yogurt

3⁄4 teaspoon dried dill

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to a high broil.

  2. Rinse the fish and pat it dry. Place it in a single layer (no overlap) in an extra-large baking dish or 2 medium baking dishes. Pour the melted butter over the top and turn each fillet in the butter to coat well on both sides. Sprinkle lightly with black pepper and pepper flakes (if using).

  3. Combine the Parmesan, mayo, yogurt, and dill in a bowl and stir until a paste forms. Set aside.

  4. Put the fish on the second rack from the top of the oven and broil for 3 minutes.

  5. Remove from the oven, turn each piece over, and smear with some Parmesan paste to cover the top of the fish (easily done with a fork). Broil for another 4 to 5 minutes, until it’s bubbling and golden brown on the top and flaky in the middle.

 

This article was written by Serene Allison and Pearl Barrett from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Road Trip Snacks That Won’t Make a Mess in Your Car (and the Snacks to Avoid)

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Keep fueled on your upcoming road trip with these relatively clean, easy-to-eat road trip snacks.

As the summer winds up, there might be a road trip somewhere in your future. Whether it’s just a couple of hours in the car on your way to grandma’s, a weekend away at a lakefront resort, or a week long cross-country journey, you’re surely going to need a backseat full of road trip snacks. And, unfortunately, good road trip snacks probably aren’t the first thing you’re thinking about when you’re planning for your trip—likely, they’re one of the last things you do before heading off, either stopping at the grocery store the night before you leave or, let’s be real, even when you’re already on your way!

But this year, we can all aim to do better and plan ahead to make sure you’ve packed the best road trip snacks possible. Thankfully, we’re here to do the heavy lifting for you (you’re the one that has to lug those heavy suitcases to the car, after all!). Here, we’ve put together a list of dos and don’ts in regards to good road trip snacks (because who wants to come home with a sticky backseat to deal with?), healthy road trip snacks to make, and of course, the best road trip snacks to buy (because you’re probably not going to be all packed the night before). Read on for your road trip survival guide:

Good Road Trip Snacks, Dos and Don’ts

Do: Pack individually portioned treats. The fact that you’re strapped into a moving vehicle makes passing handfuls or ripping off portions a little tenuous. Make things easier for everyone by separating snacks into individual zip-lock baggies or buying pre-portioned snacks in bulk.
Do: Bring two bags. Bring a cooler bag for things that should be kept chilled like sliced cheese, fruit, carrot sticks, sandwiches, drinks, and more. Your pantry bag can be filled with trail mix, cookies, crackers, etc. Keeping the two separate make sure that the dry pantry foods don’t get soggy from condensation or spills.
Do: Focus on dry foods. While you might have the aspirational urge to become a health guru on your road trip, it’s a good idea to stick to self-contained fruits like bananas, apples, and oranges. Although they do leave waste, they’re relatively clean compared to melons and berries, which are prone to dripping and leave behind a wetness that can expand outside of its container.
Don’t: Pack anything that could melt or spoil. It may feel like a no-brainer, but many yummy pre-packaged foods won’t last long without refrigeration. Instead of packing chicken salad or milk for the kids, just plan to make stops to pick up along the way. And while chocolate may seem like a fun treat, it melts quicker than you’d think—so keep it to a rest stop treat unless you want to deal with a sticky mess in your backseat.
Don’t: Pack foods that need utensils. Avoid a last minute lunch meltdown when you realized you forgot to pack forks or spoons and just plan to have everything edible by hand and bite-sized. Since you’re likely to be eating out of the packaging, these foods are logistically easier to eat than those that would need forks and knifes.
Don’t: Pack messy foods. Unless you’re planning on a full car detailing post-trip, stay away from foods like crumbly granola bars, croissants, cheese puffs, and quinoa. “Foods that make you brush off your pants while eating are a no go,” says Food Director, Dawn Perry. Additionally, you might want to stay away from things that come with shells like pistachios or peanuts
Do: Pack food in mason jars. Just because you’re driving doesn’t mean that you have to skip out on the road trip snacks. Fill up a mason jar that easily fits into a cup holder so the person at the wheel (or the trusty, hungry copilot) can snack along too.

Healthy Road Trip Snacks to Make

Trying to stay away from processed foods? Load up your cooler with these homemade healthy road trip snacks. From DIY Kind bars to addictive party mixes, these snacks will help the time roll by.

Kamut-Banana-Walnut Muffins
Break and Bake Kitchen Sink Cookies
Pizza Pretzel Nuggets
Cookies and Cream Crispy Treats
Honey Mustard Snack Mix
Nutty Superfood Breakfast Bites
No-Bake Lemon-Chia Bars

Best Road Trip Snacks to Buy

Planning on taking the “There’s No Way I Can Get Snacks in Order Before I Leave” route? No worries at all! There are plenty of delicious, healthy, and fun snack options to be found at the warehouse club, grocery store, or even gas station! Pick a couple of options from this Real Simple-editor approved list.

Oreos
Nuts
Water
Granola or nut bars
Grapes
Beef jerky (We tested more than 100 and these were our favorite jerkies!)
Cheese and crackers
Popcorn

 

This article was written by Liz Steelman from Real Simple and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

These Simple Tips Can Trick You Into Eating Healthier

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“There’s no shame in buying pre-packed, pre-cut veggies ― riced cauliflower, cut-up broccoli florets, pre-made zucchini noodles, pre-chopped and pre-washed kale,” said Andrea Moss, holistic nutrition coach and founder of Moss Wellness. “Same with frozen veggies. Anything that gets you to eat veggies and makes it easier for you to do so is a win.”

If your schedule doesn’t leave a lot of extra time to prepare those foods, many stores offer fruits and vegetables that are ideal for on-the-go folks. 

Bonus points if you can complete this task on a Sunday and get your food ready for the week. Another food prep hack from Moore: If you prep soup for the week, store in the freezer in a clear bag, making sure it’s flat so it’ll save you space for more goodies. 

“If you have a whole pineapple, you’re less likely to eat it than if you go ahead and cut it up into smaller pieces,” she said.

Marisa Moore, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Atlanta, encourages her clients to wash the fruits and veggies they buy when they get home from grocery shopping and then chop them up into bite-sized pieces.

Do the dirty work first

Making this tip effective at home and keeping those better options to the front means you’re more likely to grab healthy food to munch on for a snack or add that food to a meal you’re already cooking. Plus, since you can have your eye on it, the food is less likely to go bad and you won’t be deterred from buying fruits and vegetables in the future (this is a common annoyance for people trying to eat healthy, according to several of our experts). It’s a win-win. 

“We focus on making it as easy as possible to make great choices by making the most nutritious foods highly visible, while indulgent options are just a little harder to find,” he said. “Because we know hydration is important, water is the first thing you see in our refrigerators. Seasonal fruits are placed in bowls on open counters while packaged snacks and sweets are relegated to drawers or opaque jars.”

To encourage their employees to eat healthy, Google uses a similar strategy. Scott Giambastiani, the company’s global food program chef and operations manager, told HuffPost that the offices offer less healthy options, but they’re tucked away in favor of healthier foods.

″Put healthy food where you can see it [in the fridge] and keep foods you want to cut back on in the fridge drawers,” said Katie Serbinski, the registered dietitian behind Mom to Mom Nutrition. “You can even go a step further and store healthy foods in clear containers or bags, so you can easily see and grab them without having to rinse or wash, assuming that step has been done ahead of time.”

Having healthy snacks ― fruits, vegetables, grains ― visible and within reach can change your snacking habits, according to the food and health experts we interviewed. 

Fruits (and other healthy items) to the front

We chatted with dietitians and nutritionists about simple ways you can arrange your fridge, prepare your food and store your snacks to promote a healthier lifestyle. Here are their tips. 

Looking to eat healthier? With a few subtle changes in your kitchen, you might just be able to trick yourself into making it happen. 

Trinette Reed via Getty Images

We talked to experts about simple ways you can prep, store and arrange your food to get the most out of a healthier lifestyle.

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Preparing food (washing, cutting, etc.) as soon as you get home from the grocery store can encourage you to munch on healthier snacks and put together more well-balanced meals. Also, keep the healthier food in clear containers so you always know what you have in stock.

Dorling Kindersley: Dave King via Getty Images

Divide the fridge into sections (and CLEAN IT.)

Many people keep fruits and vegetables in the crisper drawer of their fridge and fill their pantries with boxed and canned goods, but how many of us really go beyond that? 

Molly Lee, holistic health coach and founder and director of Energizing Nutrition, said that further organizing your fridge and the rest of your kitchen can make it easier when you’re cooking.

“Have different sections for different categories of food,” she said. “It prevents cross contamination, but it also is organized so you can make a well-balanced meal.”

If you have kids who can pack their own lunch or grab their own after-school snack, consider having a drawer in the fridge and/or a section of the pantry just for them, suggests Serbinski. You’re establishing both independence and good eating habits. 

Also don’t forget ― seriously, don’t forget ― to clean your fridge.

“A tidy fridge is an inviting fridge! Throw out those leftovers weekly,” Moss said.

Consider revamping your dishes (and don’t forget about mason jars)

Lee told HuffPost that “organization is the key” when it comes to a kitchen that will help you eat healthier, but having an appealing kitchen can also help. 

“If you have chipped plates or you don’t have the right equipment, it’s not going to be pleasurable to make food,” she said. “A beautiful bowl, plate and mug that you love can really go a long way for making sort of a ritual.”

Don’t sleep on mason jars, either.

“You just stack your favorite ingredients,” Lee said. “You can stack greens, nuts and seeds, chickpeas, tuna or leftover chicken or feta cheese, and it’s easy. Plus, it looks beautiful and you won’t forget about it because it’s clear.”

For those with a sweet tooth, Lee suggested adding organic Greek or plain yogurt to fresh berries and low-sugar granola (make sure it’s naturally sweet, not made with a ton of added sugar).  

Don’t be too hard on yourself when it comes to indulgences

Whether you’ve got a sweet tooth or are always craving something salty, ridding yourself of all your cravings doesn’t always work. For a more realistic balance, Moore suggests having only “one indulgent thing” in your living space at a time and leaving the rest at the store (that midnight snack craving won’t be as difficult to overcome if you’ve only got one option).

Lee sticks to encouraging her clients to eat “the highest quality of your favorite dessert.” Think organic dark chocolate or raw honey, perhaps mixed with another healthy snack.

“It’s more expensive so you really savor it, and it tastes really good because it’s using really good ingredients,” she said. 

However you deal with those cravings, a good rule is to somewhat fool yourself and tuck them away somewhere.

“Maybe you have chips or you have cookies in the back of the bottom shelf,” Moore said.

Out of sight, out of mind, and hopefully out of your healthier lifestyle.

 

This article was written by Taylor Pittman from Huffington Post and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

How I Finally Got My Kids to Eat Their Veggies—and Like It

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I used to stand in front of the blender so they couldn’t see. Sautéed zucchini, red and yellow peppers, spinach—I’d throw it all in there quickly with the tomato sauce and breathe a sigh of relief when the crunching would stop and the swirling would begin. Meanwhile, my boys (4 and 6 at the time) would play with their Legos on the kitchen table none the wiser. Sure, I could openly put some veggies on the table (exactly two: broccoli and carrots), but that never felt like enough.

Then one day, a letter came home from my son’s kindergarten PE teacher announcing a nutrition challenge she called Strive for Five. Based on the National Cancer Institute’s recommendation to eat five servings of fruits or vegetables each day, all kindergarten classes would compete to eat at least three servings (but aim for five) of fruits or vegetables a day to celebrate National Nutrition Month in March. All the parents got a handy calendar so we could keep track. The reward? The kindergarten class with the most servings got to choose an activity for PE.

That night, as my husband and I were munching on potato chips on the couch, I remembered that the letter said that the challenge might help parents eat better, too. That promise that we’d start eating a Mediterranean diet this year hadn’t really been working out.

“What do you think if we all did the challenge?” I said.

After my husband finished his delicate, crispy, so-salty-it-sings potato chip, he wiped his hands and said he was all for it. He reminded me that March is the beginning of Greek lent, when he cuts out meat and dairy for 40 days. If I wanted, I could join him, too. Over breakfast the next day, we told the kids that we’re all going to get in on the competition.

“Even me?” said the four-year-old.

“Yes, even you,” I said.

“But what do we get?” my kindergartner asked. I told the boys that, just like the school reward, we could do an activity of their choice for a day. The outing could be anything they wanted, within reason, like going to the aquarium or the science museum or the arcade (read: family time).

The boys grabbed some magic markers and decorated their calendars with pictures and added their names. I posted them on the fridge at eye level so they could easily mark them up every day. They boys were so excited, they wanted to start that day, but I told them they’d have to wait until March 1.

While the idea seemed perfect for our family, because we’re naturally a little competitive (my husband even told the boys, “I’m going to destroy you!”), I honestly didn’t think my kids would follow through. Take our attempt at chore lists. They got tired of being asked to do a chore and mark up their magnetic chart, and I got tired of asking them. My boys were certainly acting excited about the fruit and veggie challenge, but I thought maybe at the end they’d forgo the veggies and focus only on fruit (they eat fruit like I eat chips). Or they’d give up altogether.

But amazingly, they totally owned it.

“Does this count as a serving?” the boys would ask me, nearly every day. Five broccoli florets, check. Four raw carrots, check. Spinach with garlic, check! Two spoonfuls of sautéed mushrooms, absolutely check! Toward the end, my kindergartner even discovered the joy of salad sprinkled generously with vinegar. The boys totally motivated us, too; my husband and I were finally eating like we were in the Mediterranean. Every time the boys marked up their chart, they grinned, as if they were getting away with something. Little did they know I thought I was getting away with something, too.

It may have worked because they could take care of their own chart. Or maybe they had the arcade in mind, but I also think they had a chance to outshine their parents every day. When do kids get to do that? When my kindergartner was tallying up his servings for the day, he’d also count up everyone else’s. “Ha! I have… 7 and Daddy has only 5!” Every week or so, he’d add up everyone’s total servings for the month so far, just to see who was pulling ahead (math skills!).

My little one, I must admit, fell off the wagon toward the end. In the last week, he started saying “I don’t care if I win,” with chocolate on his cheek. But my kindergartner cared very much, and during the month he started reading nutrition labels on almost everything we ate (“Mom, this orange juice is good for you. It has no sodium!” he even said to me).

On the last day, my kindergartner and my husband were neck and neck. “You’re totally going down!” my husband said to him at breakfast. After our boy left the room, I whispered to my husband that maybe we could let him win, just this once. “He’s come so far, and he totally deserves it,” I said. He just smiled at me.

At the arcade, our boys shot up dinosaurs as my husband and I sipped on our coffee, thinking we were totally owning this parenting thing. My kindergartner’s class won the competition at school, too. Mostly, my kids’ good eating habits stuck around after March. They do eat more veggies than they did before the challenge, but I’m not above mashing sweet potato into pancake batter.

 

This article was written by Cheryl Pappas from Real Simple and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Nutritious and Fun Breakfast: Banana in a Blanket

Perfect for breakfast or shared as a snack, this delicious, hearty little recipe is sure to please!

Ingredients

  • 1 six-inch whole wheat tortilla
  • 1 tablespoon nut or seed butter or cream cheese
  • 1 banana
  • 1 teaspoon honey or maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon granola

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Lay the tortilla on a plate and spread the entire surface evenly with the nut or seed butter or cream cheese.

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Peel the banana and place on one edge of the tortilla.

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Sprinkle with granola.

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Drizzle maple syrup or honey on top.

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Roll the tortilla to wrap the banana in the “blanket.”

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Slice in half, serve and enjoy!

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