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Posts Tagged ‘Mathematics’

This Mom’s Clever Hack May be the Perfect Way to Teach Your Kids About Money

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It’s never too early to learn about financial responsibility.

Working moms already do a great job in leading by example and teaching their kids about the value of hard work, but one mom took things a bit further by actually giving her daughter imaginary bills and checks to teach her some key financial lessons.

Lynn Brooks, a working mom of two from Birmingham, AL, posted her parenting hack on Facebook where it has since been shared more than 150,000 times. In the post, she says wanted to teach her child important life skills. “Not only is my daughter learning responsibilities, she’s also learning her math in the process,” she wrote.

Every week her daughter Londyn is given a paycheck for all of her “work,” such as going to school, and even gets a bonus for good grades. The official paycheck is of course signed off by Mom.

However, Londyn also has some “bills” she is responsible for paying. She is billed every week for using water, power and Internet. Lynn puts all of the money her daughter pays into a savings account for her.

Londyn’s mom even creates a work and payment schedule every week to help her keep track of everything.

The money that Londyn earns is kept at the “bank” for safekeeping. Londyn has to fill out withdrawal and deposit slips, which also double as extra math lessons.

She can even shop at a little store her mom set up, where treats can be purchased using the saved wages.

In her original post, Lynn encourages other parents to do something similar with their own kids—especially since they may not be receiving these types of lessons in school. “Schools are not teaching this much-needed aspect of life,” she wrote. “[There are] so many kids—even young adults and teens—that only know how to use a debit card. So parents, guardians, friends and family, by all means find your structure and create saving magic.”

Lynn also added that her daughter is definitely learning some serious financial responsibility because of it. “My daughter is confident, learning and is improving,” Lynn wrote. “It’s borderline bribery, however, we ALL feel great when we get rewarded and being acknowledged for doing a great job. Make this project your own. It’s fun.”

 

This article was written by Joseph Barberio from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Three Easy Science Experiments Your Child is Sure to Love

IMG_2672_philly_00429Children have a natural curiosity in STEAM subjects (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics). You can encourage your little scientist’s interests by conducting the following easy experiments at home.

Milk Fireworks: Pour whole milk into a baking pan. Add drops of red and blue food coloring. Add a “squirt” or two of dishwashing liquid, and watch the colors burst and swirl! When the “fireworks” slow down, add another couple of drops of dishwashing liquid to get them going again. Explanation: The soap separates the fat from the other liquids in the milk, causing patterns to appear.

Dancing Raisins: Put raisins (or dried corn or macaroni) in a clear cup. Fill the cup with lemon-lime soda. Watch how the raisins bob and sink in the cup. Ask your child what makes the raisins do this. Explanation: The gas bubbles in the soda lift each raisin up, and when the bubbles reach the surface and pop, the raisins sink.

Salt & Vinegar Pennies: Put ¼ cup of white vinegar into a clear plastic or glass bowl. Add one teaspoon of table salt and stir until the salt dissolves. Dip a dull, dirty penny halfway into the liquid, holding it there for 10 to 20 seconds. Remove the penny from the liquid. What does your child see? Explanation: Salt and vinegar create a weak acid that dissolves copper oxide, which is the tarnish on a dull penny.

*An adult should oversee all activities. Activities may not be appropriate for all ages.

Measuring Up

The Goddard SchoolWords like ‘measurement’ and ‘data’ may connote Excel spreadsheets and pie charts, but for a young child, sorting, measuring and collecting is fun.  Measuring and collecting data teaches young children to make logical connections, observe patterns and changes and analyze information. These processes encourage critical thinking skills that are necessary for success in school and life. Early mastery of these skills lays the foundation for positive math experiences throughout a child’s life.

At The Goddard School, children use early math skills throughout their daily routines and activities. Try these activities with your child to encourage early math skills:

  • Play with shape sorters. Describe the colors and shapes, and then match the shapes to items in the room;
  • Sort the laundry together;
  • Have your child help you measure the ingredients for cookies;
  • Weigh produce at the grocery store;
  • Measure items around the house with a ruler, a measuring stick or a piece of string;
  • Use a chore chart to track simple chores;
  • Make a graph of family favorites, such as favorite foods, favorite colors and favorite activities;
  • Cut a pizza into eight equal pieces. 

Want more ideas?  Check out “Helping Your Child Learn Mathematics” from the U.S. Department of Education.