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Posts Tagged ‘Snacks’

Peanut-Free Snacks for School

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A peanut allergy is a serious thing and it’s become increasingly common, so more and more schools are starting to play it safe by prohibiting peanuts in kids’ lunches and snacks. Keeping lunchtime truly safe for all kids requires more than just taking old standbys like PB&J off the menu. But it’s hard to know what’s safe to send, especially when confusing labeling and sometimes unclear manufacturing practices make navigating the murky waters of allergy-safe snack foods especially tricky.

Fortunately, there are tons of yummy lunchbox-friendly packaged snacks on the market that are totally peanut-free, meaning they weren’t made with peanuts OR manufactured in a plant where peanuts have been used.

To make things super easy on you, we’ve taken the guesswork out of figuring out which packaged snacks you can and can’t send into a peanut-free lunchroom, with a monster list of goodies—some tried and true, some brand new—all of which are totally peanut-free and delicious.

Cheesy snacks:

These are so often a hit and the ever-popular Pepperidge Farm Goldfish Crackers, Annie’s Homegrown Cheddar Bunnies, Cheese Nips, and Kraft Handi-snacks are all peanut-free and available in convenient single-serve packages. Another cheesy winner is Pirate Booty, a cheese-dusted puffed rice and corn snack made by Pirate Brands, which also puts out several other yummy nut-free snacks, such as Veggie Booty, Tings, Smart Puffs, and Soy Crisps.

Chips:

While we can’t really endorse snacking on potato chips every day, we also can’t deny that sometimes there’s just nothing better than a salty chip. Several varieties of Utz, Wise, Herr’s, Cape Cod, Pringles, and Ruffles potato chips are peanut-free, including plain/original and BBQ (check the packaging on other flavors).

For an equally delicious and super nutritious chip choice, check out Beanfields bean and rice tortilla chips, available in 1.5 oz single serve bags. They’re full of protein and fiber and come in seven yummy flavors (Sea Salt, Nacho, Pico de Gallo, Barbecue, Ranch, Salt & Pepper, and Unsalted). And no need to worry about peanuts—they’re so careful about contamination at Beanfields they don’t even let their team read Peanuts comics in the break room.

Applesauce and Packaged Fruit:

Of course, we all know that fresh fruit is an ideal choice when it comes to healthy snacking, but there are times when prepackaged produce just works better on the go. Motts individual packages of applesauce, GoGo Squeez pouches, and fruit cups by DelMonte, are all sweet peanut-free options. We also love the convenience, crunch, and fruity deliciousness of Crispy Green freeze-dried fruit. With fun flavors like Asian pear, cantaloupe, and tangerine (as well as the usual suspects, including apple and banana) it’s a fun, peanut-free way to snack.

Pretzels:

A school snack staple, pretzels are a great, safe option for a peanut-free lunchroom. Many popular brands such as Newman’s Own, PepperidgeFarm, Herr’s, Utz, Bachman, and Rold Gold are peanut-free and come in convenient lunch-sized packaging.

For a fun twist (get it?) on pretzel snacking, try Pretzilla soft pretzel bites. Available in a 12.3 oz tub or convenient 4 oz single-serve packages, they’re a great choice on their own or paired with a nut-free dip, such as hummus, ranch dip, or alongside Sunbutter’s on the go single cups (it smells like peanut butter, it spreads like peanut butter, it even tastes a whole lot like peanut butter—no wonder it’s the only non-peanut butter that’s part of the national school lunch system). Pretzilla also makes mini buns, which are perfect for snack-sized sandwiches.

Popcorn:

Whole grain, high fiber, and super munchable, popcorn rarely fails the kid test. Individual-sized bags in tons of flavors from brands like Utz, Herr’s, Smartfood, Divvies, and SkinnyPop are handy, school-safe lunchbox toss-ins. And popcorn chips, which are more or less what they sound like—popcorn turned into a chip (well, kind of; they’re corn chips that are air-popped)—are also a great nut-free snack option for popcorn lovers. Look for Popcorners, Safe + Fair Popcorn Quinoa Chips, and My Super Pops, adorable mini popcorn chips in Honey BBQ, White Cheddar, and Kettle from newcomer My Super Foods, a company founded and run by two moms, who were inspired to create nourishing snacks for their own children.

Bars:

Granola bars and snack bars are such a no-brainer when it comes to packing snacks for the school day. They’re portable, single-serve, and usually chock-full of fiber, protein, and healthy fat. But, more often than not, they’re a veritable nut fest or, at the very least, are manufactured near other products that contain nuts.

So what kind of granola bars or snack bars are okay for nut-free snacking? Lots, as it turns out! Cascadian Farm Granola Bars (Chocolate Chip or Vanilla Chip), Don’t Go Nuts Energy Bars (Boogie Board Bash, Gorilla Power, Whitewater Chomp, Blueberry Blast, Celestial Campout, Lift Service), Enjoy Life Baked Chewy Bars and Soft Baked Bars (Caramel Apple, Mixed Berry, Sunseed Crunch, Cocoa Loco, Caramel Blondie, Carrot Cake, Lemon Blueberry Poppyseed), Made Good Granola Bars (Mixed Berry, Chocolate Chip, Chocolate Banana, Apple Cinnamon, Strawberry), and Envirokidz Granola Bars and Crispy Rice Bars (Strawberry, Chocolate Chip, Chocolate, Berry Blast) to name but a few!

Zego, another company offering tons of snack bars, including Fruit + Chia Bars (Blueberry, Raspberry, Strawberry), Just Fruit Bars (Blueberry, Cherry, Pear, Raspberry, Strawberry), and Organic Seed + Fruit Bar (Apple Cinnamon, Fudgy Chocolate, Lemon Ginger, Sunflower Date) not only excludes the most common allergens from all of their products, they also test every batch at the end of production for traces of allergens and pesticides. They even include a QR code on all of their packaging that consumers can scan to see results of their testing.

Dairy Snacks:

 Yogurt, cheese, and bottled smoothies are great for growing kids. They’re packed with calcium and are usually peanut-free. Look for string cheese by Horizon Organic, Kraft, Organic Valley, Sargento, Sorrento, Land O Lakes, Tilamook, and Finlandia, all of which are safe for peanut-free schools.

Laughing Cow and Mini Babybel cheese wheels are another convenient, single-serve cheese option worth seeking out. Yogurt in its many forms—squeezable, drinkable and spoonable—works, too, especially when you shop for brands with less sugar, fewer artificial ingredients, and no high fructose corn syrup, like Annie’s Homegrown, Happy Family, and Stonyfield Farms. Keep an eye out for Stonyfield’s newest peanut-free lunchbox-ready snack packs. They’re yogurt and dippers in 5 delish flavor combinations: Strawberry & Chocolate Chip Cookie, Vanilla & Chocolate Cookie, Strawberry & Graham Crackers. Chocolate & Graham Crackers. Chocolate & Pretzel. No spoon required!

Treats:

From cookies to cupcakes to candy there’s actually plenty to choose from in the peanut-free treat universe. Good news if you have a classroom birthday party coming up! Enjoy Life Foods, a leading brand in the “free-from” category, makes popular soft-baked and crunchy cookies in enough flavors to please just about anyone. Fig Newtons, Nabisco Ginger Snaps, Oreos, and Barnum’s Animal Crackers are also safe choices.

Smashmallow has recently introduced Smash Crispy crispy rice treats (Strawberries & Cream, Cinnamon Churro, and Mint Chocolate Chip), a better-for-you lunchbox treat that’s non-GMO and gluten-free. School Safe and Divvies are reliable for cupcakes. And as for candy, there’s definitely something for everyone.

Gummy and jelly bean devotees can look for Black Forest gummies and fruit snacks, Jelly Belly Jelly Beans, and Surf Sweets, which offers a lower-guilt product that’s made with natural, non-GMO ingredients, free from harmful additives. There’s good news for little chocolate lovers, too—Tootsie Rolls, Tootsie Pops, and Junior Mints are all completely peanut-free as are all of the products manufactured by Vermont Nut Free Chocolates (their chocolate covered pretzels work well as a little lunchtime treat) and No Whey Chocolate, whose products are free from all 8 of the most common allergens. Give their Pea “Not” Butter Cups a try!

Just one note: be sure to pay close attention to the wording on snack packaging, since most brands print a warning statement or allergen list. Keep an eye out for phrases like: “May Contain Peanut or Tree Nuts”; “Manufactured in a plant with Peanut or Tree Nuts”; “Contains Peanut or Tree Nut Ingredients”
 

 

This article was written by Suzy Scherr from Parents and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Encourage Healthy Habits With a Snack Drawer

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Every day after school, it’s the same scene in my house: My son asks for a snack, I offer up an idea (usually starting with what he chose yesterday or the day before), which he promptly turns down. He might come back to it a few minutes later, after I’ve exhausted all other possibilities, but he never says yes to the first suggestion. He holds out until he know what all his options are.

I always have healthy options on hand—grapes and yogurt and pretzels—but I’m also guilty of buying Party Mix, which is decidedly not healthy (and is, therefore, usually my son’s top choice).

Nutrition writer Casey Seidenberg offers up this suggestion in the Washington Post: Create “snack drawers.”

Create a refrigerator snack drawer full of foods such as hard-boiled eggs, blueberries, carrots and yogurt, and always have a bowl of fresh fruit on the counter. Also, create a snack drawer outside the refrigerator. Fill it with mostly healthy snacks such as applesauce, raisins and nutritious bars, but add a few less healthy items, such as leftover Halloween candy. Explain that at snack time, they may eat from either of these locations.

My kid eats enough candy already (I pack him a piece in his lunch for dessert and he gets a small dessert after dinner most nights), so I would adjust that part. Instead, I could pack up small portions of so-good-but-not-good-for-you Party Mix next to larger portions of pretzels or granola and let him choose for himself. If he wants to indulge, he can but with a smaller portion. If he’s hungrier, he’ll have to opt for the bigger, healthier choice.

Either way, it’s his decision and I can stop reciting his options day after day after day.

Seidenberg offers up a few more tips for teaching healthy snacking habits to kids, including teaching them about hunger cues, setting specific snack times and deciding on a family rule for sugary foods. I’m admittedly not that regimented when it comes to snacking, but the drawer seems like a quick and easy way to cut down on some of the snack time debate.

As with all things parenting, you can go as quick-and-dirty or as elaborate as you’d like. I searched “snack drawer ideas” on Pinterest and found everything from drawers stuffed with Mott’s, fruit snacks and Cheez-It bags to beautifully organized drawers with tiny containers, perfect portions and helpful labels. I’m more likely to fall in the former, rather than latter, category, but either way it’s worth a shot.

 

This article was written by shared by Meghan Moravcik Walbert to Lifehacker and Meghan Moravcik Walbert on Offspring from Lifehacker and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

13 Healthy Halloween Snacks That Won’t Scare Kids Away

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If you’re anything like us, then you know what it’s like to spend Halloween trying your hardest not to consume the entire candy stash before the first kid knocks on your door.

But if you can’t trust yourself sitting beside that Costco-size box of chocolate bars all night (who can?!), consider stocking up on these 13 healthier Halloween snacks. They offer kiddos more balanced options but also won’t make you feel like crap if you can’t stop at just one.

This list is 100-percent dietitian-approved: Some are allergen-friendly, vegan, or gluten-free; others are organic, non-GMO, and void of artificial colors or flavors. And a bunch of them pack a wide range of lower-sugar, antioxidant-rich ingredients. So whatever your Halloween vice, whether it’s sweet, salty, or something in-between, we’ve got a healthier Halloween treat for you. Oh, and the kids.

 

1. YumEarth Organic Pomegranate Licorice

A common source of food sensitivities, red food coloring isn’t usually a fan favorite among parents of candy-loving kids. Thankfully, these little licorice nibs are flavored with organic pomegranate and cherry juice and colored naturally with organic fruit concentrates, yielding a gluten-free, vegan, and nut-free treat.

($19 for 6 bags; amazon.com)

 

2. MadeGood Halloween Chocolate Granola Minis

Halloween can be a nightmare for a kid with severe food allergies, so we love these limited-edition chocolate chip granola minis from MadeGood. Free of the top eight allergens, organic, gluten-free, and non-GMO project verified, these bars are a breath of fresh air for concerned parents. They’re also a charitable choice this Halloween since 2 percent of all proceeds from the bars goes directly to Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals.

($19 for 36 minis; amazon.com)

 

3. Veggie Go’s Organic Fruit and Veggie Strips

Packed with a half-cup of organic fruit and veggies per strip, plus fiber-rich flaxseeds and a touch of cinnamon, these no-sugar-added snacks are a smart way to get your sweet fix on October 31. They’re also gluten-free, vegan, non-GMO, and have less than 20 calories per bar (not that we are counting, but that’s pretty good).

($23 for 20 strips; amazon.com)

 

4. Free2b Dark Chocolate Mint Cups

Ready to trade that classic (massive) Peppermint Patty for something a little lighter? We love these vegan dark chocolate mint cups because they’re free of the top 12 allergens (nuts, dairy, gluten, oh my!) and are made with fair-trade unsweetened dark chocolate so we can feel good about where they came from.

($32 for 24; amazon.com)

 

5. Annie’s Organic Orchard Cherry Apple Fruit Bites

With organic fruit pureé as the first ingredient and no artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives, moms and dads won’t mind popping these fruity bites into kiddo’s lunch for a healthier post-Halloween snack.

($5 for 5 packs; walmart.com)

 

6. KIND Minis

With just 2 grams of added sugars per 100-calorie bar, along with 3 grams each of fiber and protein, you can feel good about these KIND minis making an appearance in your kids’ stash. Sweet, salty, chocolaty, and crunchy, they check all the boxes for a healthier Halloween treat.

($22 for 20 bars; amazon.com)

 

7. The Good Bean Sea Salt Crunchy Chickpeas

Need a savory option for the chip fans in your life? We got you. These single-serve bags of addictive crispy chickpeas pack 4 grams of protein and fiber into every 90-calorie pack, making them an awesome choice for your kids (and you, of course).

($30 for 50 packs; amazon.com)

 

8. Unreal Dark Chocolate Crispy Quinoa Gems

Getting your chocolate fix doesn’t have to mean tossing junk food into your grocery cart just before checkout. These tasty chocolate rounds are made with organic, non-GMO, fair-trade dark chocolate and are vegan and gluten-free. They’re also colored naturally with fruit and veggie extract instead of the standard food dyes and offer a delicate crunch from protein-rich quinoa.

($26 for 6 bags; shop.getunreal.com)

 

9. Justin’s Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups

Neighborhood mamas and dads are going to be pumped when they find these in their kids’ candy bag. The better-for-you cups are made with organic dark chocolate and organic peanuts and offer 4 grams of protein per two-cup package. Sorry, kids, we might have to confiscate your bag for these.

($25 for 12 packs; amazon.com)

 

12. Skinny Dipped Almonds

Finally, a Halloween option that could make its way into the holiday season too (seriously, these are great stocking stuffers). The dark chocolate-dipped almonds have just 60 calories per pack and only 2 grams of sugar. The almonds are coated in an antioxidant-rich dark chocolate for a healthy treat that will give Almond Joys a run for their money.

($35 for 24 packs; skinnydipped.com)

 

13. Fruits in Chocolate Dark Chocolate Covered Coconut

Each individually wrapped truffle features a whole dried fruit coated in rich dark chocolate with just 50 to 70 calories per piece. They’re available as a mixed box with prunes, cranberries, and apricots, so you can give ’em to the kids who could use a more natural chocolate fix this fall (so, all of them).

($23 for 46 pieces; fruitsinchocolate.com)

Every editorial product is independently selected by our editors. If you buy something through one of our links, we may earn a commission. But don’t worry, it doesn’t cost you anything extra, and we wouldn’t recommend a product if we didn’t love it as much as we love puppies.

 

This article was written by Abbey Sharp from Greatist and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

14 Spooky Halloween Treats to Make with Your Kids

 

Two Peas and Their Pod

Sweet and Salty Marshmallow Popcorn

Make like PureWow Coterie member Maria Lichty and have your kids stir in the candy.

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The Mom 100

Mummy Cupcakes

The more disheveled the mummy, the better. (Thanks, Katie Workman.)

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It’s Always Autumn

Cute and Easy Mini Halloween Doughnuts

Bats, monsters and spiders, oh my.

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Sally’s Baking Addiction

Candy Corn Pretzel Hugs

Let the kids assemble, then watch them melt in the oven.

Get the recipe

Working Mom Magic

Marshmallow Monsters

Googly eyes? Check. Sprinkles? Double check.

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Gimme Some Oven

Brownie Spiders

The kids can attach the legs; you can eat the leftovers.

Get the recipe

Five Heart Home

Pretzel Candy Spiderwebs

Much less scary than the real thing.

Get the recipe

Kid-Friendly Things to Do

Halloween Chocolate Pretzel Bites

Grab some forks and let them go wild.

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Damn Delicious

Halloween Spider Cupcakes

Getting your kids in the kitchen has never been easier.

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Dinner At the Zoo

3-Ingredient Butterfinger Caramel Apples

Using pre-made caramel candies makes this kid-friendly.

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Sprinkle Bakes

Monster Popcorn Balls

Bonus points for the plastic vampire teeth.

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Well Plated

Halloween Banana Popsicles

Frighteningly good, and sorta healthy. 

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I Can Teach My Child

Pumpkin Patch Dirt Cups

As fun to make as they are to eat.

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How Sweet Eats

Chocolate Bark Halloween Brownies

Two words: sugar rush.

Get the recipe

 

This article was from PureWow and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

16 Allergy-Friendly Treats that Are Totally Safe to Take to School

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Whether you’re revving up to dominate the class bake sale or just looking for something sweet to slip into your kid’s lunch box, here are 19 nut-free options that are safe to take to school. Bring on the cupcakes, cookies and hand pies (and don’t forget to save some for the baker).

 

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Hand Pies

Finally, a toaster pastry that tastes as good as it looks. Plus, they’re egg-free.

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Well Plated

Strawberry Oatmeal Bars

Whip up this whole-grain, egg-free dessert in one bowl.

Get the recipe

Super Healthy Kids

Healthy and Fun Yogurt Snacks

Playtime meets snack time. Gluten-free, egg-free and dairy-free if you use coconut or almond-milk yogurt.

Get the recipe

The Busy Baker

Soft and Chewy Sugar Cookie Bars

Way faster than rolling out cookie dough balls.

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Paper& Stitch

Homemade Cereal Cannolis

Shh, these start with pre-bought shells.

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Aww Sam

Colorful Terrarium Pudding Cups

Up the ante on gummy worms.

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Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Watercolor Doughnuts

Mom might want to taste test these first.

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Chew Out Loud

White Chocolate Raspberry Cheesecake Bites

Just the right size for tiny hands.

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Erica’s Sweet Tooth

Mini Banana Pancake Skewers

Cutest-ever morning snack.

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Dessert for Two

Strawberry Rice Krispies Treats

The secret ingredient? Strawberry fluff (and no eggs in sight).

Get the recipe

Hello, Wonderful

Easy Apple Fruit Doughnuts

You won’t find eggs or gluten on the ingredient list.

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Thirsty For Tea

Waffle Fortune Cookies

The cutest way to write your kid a note.

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Hungry Rabbit

Rainbow Cookies

They’re our favorite color.

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Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Samoa Cupcakes

Best birthday ever.

Get the recipe

Photo: Liz Andrew/Styling: Erin McDowell

Glazed Doughnut Cookies

So cute, they give the doughnut emoji a run for its money.

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Femme Fraiche

Galaxy Whoopie Pies

They’ll vote your kid class president.

Get the recipe

 

This article was from PureWow and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Road Trip Snacks That Won’t Make a Mess in Your Car (and the Snacks to Avoid)

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Keep fueled on your upcoming road trip with these relatively clean, easy-to-eat road trip snacks.

As the summer winds up, there might be a road trip somewhere in your future. Whether it’s just a couple of hours in the car on your way to grandma’s, a weekend away at a lakefront resort, or a week long cross-country journey, you’re surely going to need a backseat full of road trip snacks. And, unfortunately, good road trip snacks probably aren’t the first thing you’re thinking about when you’re planning for your trip—likely, they’re one of the last things you do before heading off, either stopping at the grocery store the night before you leave or, let’s be real, even when you’re already on your way!

But this year, we can all aim to do better and plan ahead to make sure you’ve packed the best road trip snacks possible. Thankfully, we’re here to do the heavy lifting for you (you’re the one that has to lug those heavy suitcases to the car, after all!). Here, we’ve put together a list of dos and don’ts in regards to good road trip snacks (because who wants to come home with a sticky backseat to deal with?), healthy road trip snacks to make, and of course, the best road trip snacks to buy (because you’re probably not going to be all packed the night before). Read on for your road trip survival guide:

Good Road Trip Snacks, Dos and Don’ts

Do: Pack individually portioned treats. The fact that you’re strapped into a moving vehicle makes passing handfuls or ripping off portions a little tenuous. Make things easier for everyone by separating snacks into individual zip-lock baggies or buying pre-portioned snacks in bulk.
Do: Bring two bags. Bring a cooler bag for things that should be kept chilled like sliced cheese, fruit, carrot sticks, sandwiches, drinks, and more. Your pantry bag can be filled with trail mix, cookies, crackers, etc. Keeping the two separate make sure that the dry pantry foods don’t get soggy from condensation or spills.
Do: Focus on dry foods. While you might have the aspirational urge to become a health guru on your road trip, it’s a good idea to stick to self-contained fruits like bananas, apples, and oranges. Although they do leave waste, they’re relatively clean compared to melons and berries, which are prone to dripping and leave behind a wetness that can expand outside of its container.
Don’t: Pack anything that could melt or spoil. It may feel like a no-brainer, but many yummy pre-packaged foods won’t last long without refrigeration. Instead of packing chicken salad or milk for the kids, just plan to make stops to pick up along the way. And while chocolate may seem like a fun treat, it melts quicker than you’d think—so keep it to a rest stop treat unless you want to deal with a sticky mess in your backseat.
Don’t: Pack foods that need utensils. Avoid a last minute lunch meltdown when you realized you forgot to pack forks or spoons and just plan to have everything edible by hand and bite-sized. Since you’re likely to be eating out of the packaging, these foods are logistically easier to eat than those that would need forks and knifes.
Don’t: Pack messy foods. Unless you’re planning on a full car detailing post-trip, stay away from foods like crumbly granola bars, croissants, cheese puffs, and quinoa. “Foods that make you brush off your pants while eating are a no go,” says Food Director, Dawn Perry. Additionally, you might want to stay away from things that come with shells like pistachios or peanuts
Do: Pack food in mason jars. Just because you’re driving doesn’t mean that you have to skip out on the road trip snacks. Fill up a mason jar that easily fits into a cup holder so the person at the wheel (or the trusty, hungry copilot) can snack along too.

Healthy Road Trip Snacks to Make

Trying to stay away from processed foods? Load up your cooler with these homemade healthy road trip snacks. From DIY Kind bars to addictive party mixes, these snacks will help the time roll by.

Kamut-Banana-Walnut Muffins
Break and Bake Kitchen Sink Cookies
Pizza Pretzel Nuggets
Cookies and Cream Crispy Treats
Honey Mustard Snack Mix
Nutty Superfood Breakfast Bites
No-Bake Lemon-Chia Bars

Best Road Trip Snacks to Buy

Planning on taking the “There’s No Way I Can Get Snacks in Order Before I Leave” route? No worries at all! There are plenty of delicious, healthy, and fun snack options to be found at the warehouse club, grocery store, or even gas station! Pick a couple of options from this Real Simple-editor approved list.

Oreos
Nuts
Water
Granola or nut bars
Grapes
Beef jerky (We tested more than 100 and these were our favorite jerkies!)
Cheese and crackers
Popcorn

 

This article was written by Liz Steelman from Real Simple and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

POLAR BEAR SNACKS

Whip up some winter fun with these delightful (and easy) polar bear snacks! Click here to see how these recipes are made.

polar-bear-snacks

Polar Bear Yogurt Bowl (Great for breakfast!)

  • 1 cup of vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 3 slices of banana
  • 3 fresh blueberries

Scoop one cup of vanilla Greek yogurt into a small round bowl.

1-a

Place two slices of banana at the top of the bowl for ears.

Place one slice of banana in the middle of the bowl for a muzzle.

1

Place one blueberry on the middle banana slice as a nose and the other two blueberries just above the muzzle as eyes.

1-d

Polar Bear Toast (An awesome afternoon snack!)

  • Slice of whole grain bread, toasted
  • 3 slices of banana
  • 5 fresh blueberries
  • Cream cheese

Spread cream cheese on a slice of whole grain toast.

2-a

Place two slices of banana at the top two corners of the toast for ears.

Place one slice of banana towards the bottom center of the toast for a muzzle.

2

Place one blueberry on each banana slice and add the other two blueberries just above the muzzle as eyes.

2-d

Polar Bear Pudding Cup (Dessert, anyone?)

  • 1 vanilla pudding cup
  • 2 slices of banana
  • 2 chocolate chips
  • 1 HERSHEY’S KISS

Open a vanilla pudding cup.

3-a

Place two slices of banana at the top of the cup for ears.

Place two chocolate chips upside down into the pudding below the banana slices as eyes.

3

Place the HERSHEY’S KISS in the center of the pudding below the eyes as a nose.

4-d

Eat up and enjoy!

 

 

Halloween Treats: Spider Snacks!

Looking for a spooktacular twist for your child’s Halloween snack? Try these tasty spider snacks!Spider Snacks 2

Ingredients:

  • Crackers
  • Cream Cheese
  • Pretzel Sticks
  • Candy-coated chocolates
  1. Spread cream cheese on a cracker.
  2. Break  pretzel sticks in half and use as legs on each side of the cracker (two per side).
  3. Use small candy-coated chocolates for eyes and place on the cream cheese.
  4. Enjoy!

Fishing for Crackers

Fishing for CrackersSpruce up snack time with this easy, healthy and fun snack!

Ingredients:

  • Carrot sticks
  • A bowl of hummus or veggie dip
  • Goldfish crackers

Dunk the carrots into the hummus or dip. Then put some goldfish crackers on a plate and use the carrot stick to “catch” the crackers.

Hazelnut Granola Apple Wedges

Does your little one have a craving for a sweet snack? Stay healthy while satisfying your child’s appetite with some hazelnut granola apple wedges!

Ingredients:

  • 1 large apple
  • Hazelnut spread
  • Low-fat granola

Cut the apple into wedges. Holding each wedge by the skin side, spread it with hazelnut spread. Sprinkle granola on hazelnut spread-covered area. Substitute peanut butter (or any nut butter) for hazelnut spread if you’d like. Also feel free to add raisins!

*An adult should oversee all recipes and activities. Recipes and activities may not be appropriate for all ages.