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Posts Tagged ‘Summer camp’

The Benefits of Summer Camps for Your Kids (And You)

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Now that the sun is shining and the weather warms up, that means the school year is coming to an end. The kids will be home for two full months meaning you have to figure out what to do while you maintain your full-time job.

Before, the kids would be busy throughout the day at school. Maybe you were able to meet them at home, or they had someone watching them until you are home from work. But what if the kids aren’t ready to be left at home all day, every day?

Consider enrolling your children in summer camps. These camps provide entertainment while educated kids on different subjects. More and more the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) summer camps are becoming the popular (and recommended) choice for kids. Why? It is because these are all skills that are needed in a continually growing workforce (think computer software developers, medical scientists, analysts).

Here are a few benefits of enrolling your children in a STEM summer camp this year.

They Learn New and Unique Skills

The skills your kids will learn at a STEM summer camp will be valuable their entire life. But not only that, they integrate these skills into a fun and exciting atmosphere. For example, coding camps give kids the opportunities to learn about computer programming skills they usually wouldn’t learn in school. Launch After School programs are a fantastic example of what kids learn, how they learn it and why it is beneficial for their future.

They Get a Feeling of Independence

Allowing your children to have the chance to foster a sense of independence will help guide them as they grow older. They go into a new environment with new people all around. While there, they have the opportunity to make their own decisions on almost anything. Add that to having to learn to develop trusting relationships with other adults and friends to help them instead of always relying on their parents.

It Builds Friendships

When you send your kid to a summer camp, they are going to be surrounded by not just kids their own age. But they will also meet people that are interested in the same things they are. Summer camps are a perfect environment for kids to build lasting friendships. Whether it be through games, free time or through team-building exercises, your children will develop friendships they will cherish for a long time.

Help Grow Up Confidently

It isn’t always easy to pack up and leave home while at a young age. It can be intimidating and scary (for you too). But sometimes that is precisely what they need to give them a little push outside their comfort zone.

Too often do children nowadays rely on things that make life easy, whether it be electronics or having things handed to them. But by going to camp, they gain experiences that they may not get anywhere else. All of these opportunities help them grow up as children and build a level of confidence they may not have gotten otherwise.

So while you figure out your summer plan between children being home and try to work, consider enrolling them in a summer camp (or maybe two). It will be a relief for you since you know where they will be the whole time and won’t have to worry about finding a babysitter. More than likely when they come home, they’ll want to go right back.

 

This article was written by Emily Green from Working Mother and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Summer Survival Tips for Parents

 

We are now in the thickMom with Boy of summer, which means heat, packed summer schedules, vacations and road trips. Whether your children are continuing their summer at a Goddard School summer program, traveling with you or staying at home, these tips for summer survival can help keep things running smoothly.

Stock Up on Summer Staples

If you’re a member of a big warehouse store or have a local grocery where household staples are sold in bulk, then you may want to the take time to stock up on daily summer staples like sunscreen, bug spray, after sun lotion, anti-bacterial hand lotion or wipes, diapers, wipes, freezer-safe barbeque foods, condiments, road trip snacks, reusable water bottles, electrolyte-infused drinks, allergy medicine for adults and children, a first aid kit for each car, favorite summer treats like ice pops and any other items you may use on a daily basis throughout the summer.

Road Trip Readiness

To keep road trips fun and educational, pack a bag for each child with age-appropriate toys, books and activities.  Pack electronics in a separate bag and keep it with you so that you can charge any devices and monitor their use.  Have a cooler or cooler bag stocked with ice, water and chilled snacks ready for anyone who gets hungry or thirsty. If you are potty training your child, pack a travel potty or travel toilet seat and a change of clothes, and keep them handy.  Make sure your first aid kit is in the glove compartment, so you can put it in your backpack or beach bag during a hike, a visit to the beach or another family adventure.  For more information on traveling with children, click here.

Prepare for Take Off  

If your family is traveling by air this summer, keep certain items on hand to keep everyone calm and alleviate any fear of flying. To move swiftly through security, wear slip-on shoes, avoid wearing belts with metal buckles and keep items you typically put in your pockets in a plastic zip-top bag in your carry-on bag.  Bring a backpack or small carry-on for each child filled with age-appropriate toys and activities and an extra layer for everyone in case the airplane is chilly. Include summer reading and fun learning activities, like flash cards or a little dry erase board for writing numbers and letters, playing tic-tac-toe and doodling.  Bring gum so the children can pop their ears, pain relievers for you and your children and wipes for spills or messes. 

Keep Summer Safe, Fun and Educational

Craft a summer checklist with your older children and involve them in the planning, packing and preparation stages of your outings, whether you are gearing up for a day at the pool, a road trip, a plane ride to your vacation spot or a visit to Grandma and Grandpa’s house. 

Choosing a Summer Program

Infants & Teacher with Bubbles AAccording to research conducted by the National Center for Summer Learning, which is based at the Johns Hopkins School of Education in Baltimore, Maryland, summer learning loss accounts for about two-thirds of the difference in the likelihood of a student pursuing a college preparatory path in high school. As these findings indicate, keeping children’s brains challenged throughout the summer is crucial, since the lack of learning that occurs during these months has both short-term and long-term consequences.

Keeping a child’s day consistent throughout the summer months keeps the brain focused and helps prevent learning losses during the summer. In addition, this can potentially ease the anxiety that often accompanies transitioning into a new classroom or school come fall.

Research has shown that programs like The Goddard School that have specific learning goals, use learning and developmental standards and are age-appropriate are ideal in preventing summer learning losses.

Tips for Choosing a Summer Program:

  • Choose a program that is based on each child’s interests and natural curiosity – this allows children the opportunity to direct their own learning.
  • Ask for credentials, experience and training of the teachers/counselors.
  • Check the health and safety practices of the program.  Make sure you are comfortable that the program will be able to handle your child’s unique needs.
  • Inquire about the daily schedule of the program.  Does the program combine songs, stories, exploration, art, physical activities and learning adventures in a safe, nurturing environment?  Ask how much freedom a child has to choose activities.
  • Ask for references.