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Posts Tagged ‘Summer Safety’

How Hot Is Too Hot for Your Kids to Play Outside?

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Summer is here, and many of us want to be outside and enjoy the beautiful weather while it lasts — especially if we live in a cooler climate. However, it important to remember our children can get very hot in a short amount of time, especially when they run around and play. But how hot is too hot?

To find out, we spoke with some doctors about when it’s too hot for our kids to be outside in the summer months, what we can do to protect them before going out in the warm weather and signs to look for if we think kids might be getting overheated.

It varies depending on your child’s activity level

Activity level plays a huge factor, Dr. Gina Posner, a pediatrician at MemorialCare Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California, tells SheKnows. If it’s 100 degrees and your kids are swimming, playing with water toys and in the shade, going outside is perfectly fine if you are keeping a close eye on them. However, If they are running around in direct sunlight, a lot of kids will overheat — even if the temperature is just in the 80s, says Posner.

A good rule of thumb is, “If it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for your kids,” Dr. S. Daniel Ganjian, a pediatrician at John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California, tells SheKnows. 

Pay attention to the heat index

Caitlin Hoff, a health and safety investigator for ConsumerSafety.org, says you shouldn’t just pay attention to the temperature on the thermometer. Make sure to keep an eye on the humidity by looking at the heat index factor too. 

“When the heat index is 100 degrees or more (over 90 degrees with 60 percent humidity), heat exhaustion is much more probable without safety measures taken,” Hoff tells SheKnows.

Age does matter

Younger children are more susceptible to heat exhaustion because “they produce less sweat” and “are less likely to feel and understand the dangers of extreme heat,” Hoff says.

Never skimp on water, shade or sunscreen

One of the most important things to remember is to keep your kids out of direct sunlight for long periods of time in the summer. They need shade, plenty of water and sunscreen whenever they are outside, Ganjian says. He also recommends dressing your children in light, long-sleeve clothing and always applying a safe sunscreen on children over 6-moths old (and then reapplying it every two hours and after water play). For babies under 6 months, Ganjian says they should avoid sun exposure all together. 

Warning signs to look for

Posner and Ganjian both say to pay attention to the warning signs of overheating, which include fever, decreased number of wet diapers, cranky behavior or being overly tired. If you notice these symptoms, they suggest a lukewarm bath, plenty of fluids and a call to your pediatrician.

There is a lot to enjoy outdoors during the summer months, but it’s best to take the necessary precautions to make sure you and your family stay safe.

 

This article was written by Katie Smith from SheKnows and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Summertime Essentials

Processed with VSCO with f2 presetThe weather is getting warmer, and summer is rapidly approaching. Since summer is the season for fun in the sun, a few essential items can help your children through the hot summer months.

  • Sunscreen is necessary because protecting your child’s skin from the sun is extremely important;
  • Children may also need sunglasses to shield their eyes from the UVA and UVB rays in sunlight. This awesome accessory allows a child to protect her eyes while looking fashionably cute doing it! Be sure to consider a hat as well;
  • Once your children are protected from the sun, it is time to get outside and play. Consider:
    • Using chalk for creative drawings and games like hopscotch with friends and family members;
    • Using spray bottles for watering plants and for cooling off with exciting water games;
    • Capturing and examining bugs with a net and an insect container. Children love venturing outside to look for butterflies and other insects. When your child captures an insect, talk with him about what he has caught, and then release the creature back into its natural surroundings.

How does your family enjoy playtime outdoors?

Summer Car Safety Tips

According to kidsandcars.org, “On average, 38 children die in hot cars each year from heat-related deaths.” This fast-paced world is full of distractions and even the greatest parents have been known to forget that their little one is sleeping the back seat. Use the tips below from kidsandcars.org to ensure this never happens to you.

  • Put something you will need, like your cell phone, handbag, employee ID, briefcase, etc., on the floor in the back of the car.
  • Get in the habit of always opening the back door of your vehicle every time you reach your destination to make sure your child is not in the car. This will soon become a habit. We call this the “Look Before You Lock” campaign.
  • Keep a large stuffed animal in the child’s car seat when it is not occupied. When the child is in the seat, put the stuffed animal in the front passenger seat. Anytime the stuffed animal is up front you know your child is in the child safety seat in the back.
  • Tell your child’s daycare center or babysitter that you will always call if your child will not be coming on a normally scheduled day.
  • When a child is missing, check your vehicles and car trunks immediately.
  • If you see a child alone in a vehicle, get involved. If they are hot or seem sick, get them out as quickly as possible. Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.